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'Double Delight ®' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 106-345
most recent 4 NOV HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 NOV by Plazbo
Is it common for the blooms after the first day or two to have slightly singed edges?

May just be Australia with the high UV index we have. It's interesting how some roses burn while others don't, like George's Best right next to it is a deep dark red mini that never looks burnt.
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Discussion id : 87-345
most recent 1 MAY SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 15 AUG 15 by johnm99
Even though this is a relatively old rose, bred during the era of constant spraying, it really does live up to its name and is a delight. Just planted last fall, very good growth, health and reasonably normal flowering frequency - the bloom is really a "double delight" both in looks and the fragrance. Fragrance would be 5/5 for me - there are a couple of more fragrant roses, but not many. I will buy a couple more this fall.
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Reply #1 of 15 posted 6 OCT 16 by Lavenderlace
Would you mind recommending the few roses that you think are more fragrant? DD doesn't work with my other colors but I've been intrigued by all the positive fragrance comments. Thanks!
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Reply #2 of 15 posted 28 APR by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Oklahoma is 10 times more fragrant than Double-Delight. Both of them have the sweet "lychee" fruit scent in alkaline clay. One bloom of Oklahoma is enough to knock your socks off. Double Delight scent is actually gone in cold weather, but vey strong in hot weather.
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Reply #3 of 15 posted 28 APR by Lavenderlace
Thank you! Even though I'm not a red person, I have Oklahoma and Double Delight now because of the fragrance reviews and have smelled their wonderful first blooms. I'm sure that both will improve with age but you are right. Oklahoma is definitely stronger. These reds are some of my few that are grafted but the nursery would never tell me what they were grafted on and of course, the Home Depot people don't know or care!
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Reply #4 of 15 posted 30 APR by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Lavenderlace: Parole (Kordes Buxom Beauty) is extremely fragrant & huge bloom. It's purplish-pinkish. Saw that in a dinky pot at HomeDepot in hot & dry weather and it had 4 huge & very fragrant blooms. Came back a month later in week-long rain and it went down hill with blackspots, so I didn't buy it. I have a hunch that Parole likes fast-draining soil (sandy) and can't tolerate standing water. I fell in love with Parole's scent, but I am NOT thrilled about Oklahoma nor Double Delight, both smell like canned lychee.
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Reply #5 of 15 posted 30 APR by johnm99
Have to agree with all the fragrant rose selections. I think it is true to say that people vary a lot in what they find fragrant. I find this within my own family. Also, it varies plant to plant and day to day.

I grow Parole and love it. I haven't grown Oklahoma in 25 years but still remember its fragrance clearly - had to give it up because of disease - I think it is better in hotter climates

If you haven't tried Jude The Obscure you might enjoy it - the Manager at David Austin in England told me he rated it as the most fragrant of their roses - I love mine. My son rates it as my most fragrant but for me, on a good day a good bloom of Fragrant Cloud is so strong I can't smell anything else for a few minutes.

I have about 200 bushes all chosen for fragrant and these ones on this page are certainly near the top. Every year I buy more that are supposed to be very fragrant, and have to boot out the least fragrant ones to make space.

But sadly one of them are fragrant one bit right now - we are a month behind our usual weather and it will be a while before we see any blooms!
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Reply #11 of 15 posted 30 APR by Lavenderlace
Love, love, love Jude the Obscure and can't seem to stop buying him!
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Reply #6 of 15 posted 30 APR by johnm99
Oops typo- should be "none of them are fragrant right now!
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Reply #9 of 15 posted 30 APR by Lavenderlace
Update: My grafted Double Delights have been very vigorous in sandy soil, tons of blooms. I don't care for red but the changing colors have been fascinating to watch.
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Reply #10 of 15 posted 30 APR by Lavenderlace
Straw, I actually bought a Parole over the winter, thank you! It's still in the pot until I can figure out what to do with the color. Only had a couple of blooms but the scent was very pleasant, though not too strong as first blooms can be.
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Reply #7 of 15 posted 30 APR by Nastarana
'Fragrant Cloud' really does live up to its' name. Also, 'Mme. Isaac Perierre', and I would guess, its' sport, 'Mme. Ernst Calvat' are famous for fragrance, as is SDLM if you live where it can be grown. 'Yolande de Aragon' also has a powerful fragrance.

'Mr. Lincoln' is known for fragrance; so are 'Othello', 'Evelyn', and 'Jude the Obscure', as mentioned above. I rather like 'Othelo's' thorny, much branching habit and rebloom is very good.
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Reply #8 of 15 posted 30 APR by Andrew from Dolton
My grandmother grew both 'Fragrant Cloud' and 'Mme. Isaac Perierre'. They were both highly scented. Her soil was very chalky and alkaline. However, they were very disease prone, especially to blackspot, 'Fragrant Cloud' was an especially sickly rose but Perierre kept on going despite spending large periods of the summer with no foliage.
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Reply #12 of 15 posted 30 APR by Lavenderlace
SDLM grows great here but so far, she doesn't agree with my nose. And I can't believe that MIP hasn't been great for me yet either. I don't know if the scent hasn't developed yet, or if it's just me!

Mr. Lincoln smells much better to me at this point, thanks for the suggestions!
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Reply #13 of 15 posted 30 APR by Lavenderlace
Love Evelyn, thanks for the suggestions!
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Reply #14 of 15 posted 1 MAY by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Chicago Botanical has loamy alkaline soil, and their SDLM has zero scent, but tons of blooms & perfect foliage. They don't have MIP, but MIP has a fabulous scent in my high-magnesium clay. MIP likes WELL-DRAINED clay. MIP did much better after I moved UP to a dry hill. The many petals roses need fertile & moisture-retentive clay to develop best scent.

I lost 3 own-root Jude through the winter, until Lavenderlace informed me that Jude prefers sandy/loamy soil. So I spent 1 hour making the soil loamy, digging very deep for drainage. Jude survived last winter, despite my Japanese maple died due to heavy rain, then freezing in Jan.

Double Delight and Fragrant Cloud both like it well-drained. My Fragrant cloud (grafted on Dr. Huey) died during last spring's flood. This is the 4th time I try Double Delight (both own-root and Dr.Huey), and it managed to stay 100% healthy last year since I dug down past 2.5 feet for drainage, plus putting red-lava rocks (pH 8) on top to buffer the acidic rain (pH 4.5 here). We have flash flood in spring .. went outside today, 5/1/17, and saw 1 foot of water in the bucket, after week-long of rain.
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Reply #15 of 15 posted 1 MAY by Lavenderlace
I'm so happy that your Judes made it through the winter! Thanks for the info on DD, I'll be careful with the drainage. Very important to know since they are in pots at the moment.
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Discussion id : 97-557
most recent 15 FEB HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 14 FEB by drossb1986
Double Delight isn't a bad plant, and there are much better actual plants out there, however the coloring of DD just can't be beat in the realm of bi-colors. And, they smell amazing. In Houston it may get a touch of mildew in the spring, or a little blackspot. Nothing tragic.

Double Delight is a garden staple and it's easy to see why it has stuck around so long. Everyone stops to gawk at it, everyone has to put their nose in it, and everyone loves it. It's a bit like having an antique car...sure, there are more reliable and more comfortable newer cars available, but the style and cache of this "oldie but goodie" just can't be beat. IMO, they certainly don't make them like this anymore.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 14 FEB by Rupert, Kim L.
Cherry Parfait here resembles Double Delight very much. It doesn't have any scent to compare, but it grows without the fungal issues and keep pushing new flowers when Double Delight stops. If you love the Double Delight coloring and don't have to have the scent, but want a stronger grower with healthier foliage, try Cherry Parfait.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 15 FEB by Andrew from Dolton
Where does this colour changing ability come from? Would it originally have been inherited form a China rose like 'Archduc Charles'?
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 15 FEB by Rupert, Kim L.
Quite possibly. Some China roses deepen with age, heat and UV. European (and American) types fade.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 15 FEB by jedmar
I believe an important element is 'Rosa foetida bicolor' which is found in the ancestry of many (if not all) red/yellow bicolor roses. This rose has a high concentration of anthocyanin pigments (for red) on the upper side of its petals and an equally high concentration of carotenoid pigments (for yellow) on the lower side. These pigments are then found in varying combinations in its descendants. A good example is 'Rumba', where the red components deepen with time. It is thought that with UV light, biosynthesis of anthocyanins progresses in the direction of higher frequencies of light absorption (darker colours), while biosynthesis of the carotenoids progresses towards lower frequencies of light absorption (orange to light yellow to almost colourless). The resulting effect is that the rose seems to become redder with time. "The Chemistry of Rose Pigments" (1991) by Swiss chemist Conrad Hans Eugster gives a detailed description of these pigments and processes as relating to roses.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 15 FEB by Andrew from Dolton
That's very interesting, thank you Kim and Jedmar.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 15 FEB by Rupert, Kim L.
Thank you, Jedmar!
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 15 FEB by Give me caffeine
Thanks for that. Interesting to know, and explains how the 'Charisma' in my garden works.
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Discussion id : 82-459
most recent 13 JAN 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 13 JAN 15 by moriah
Mine is more than 10 years old and on own root. It is very vigorous and the flowers are gorgeous.
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