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Discussion id : 115-051
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Initial post yesterday by Patricia Routley
From Michael Garhart in 'Peggy Ann Landon':
I was searching through the oldest USPTO's inventory listing. It's very cumbersome, and i didn't find a patent for Break O'Day. Don't ask me why I considered it an important mission lol. Well, actually, I recall now.

Glenn Dale is a very important rose in breeding. It is a wichurana that has produced much shorter roses, that carry both wichurana resistances and resistances from Rosa moschata that come through many generations of tea and china types. Further, non-genetic resistance of RRD was trialed for Lafter, which is a very close relation, with the same type of foliage, stems, and prickles. So it would be interesting to see the breeding pathway for Break O'Day to see if the unknown portion aided in the eventual equation that became Lafter, or if it was Glenn Dale doing 100% of the heavy lifting.
.........
Michael, I have searched through the Patents and I could not see one for 'Break o Day' 1939.
On the way through I did note the following Brownell roses which had Patents and I am not sure if any of the following might reveal something of interest:
Apricot Glow PP200
Copper Climber PP266
Snowwhite Climber PP207
Golden Comet PP235
Golden Glow PP263
Stargold PP248
Federation PP287
Frederick S. Peck PP419
Lily Pons PP420
Pink Princess PP459
Anne Vanderbilt PP504
Orange Everglow PP505
Break O Day Climbing PP696
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Discussion id : 115-038
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Initial post 2 days ago by Michael Garhart
So I cannot find a match for PP 419, but I didn't want to lose my place, so this is as good as any place. It is stated as:

"The genealogy of my new rose is to the best of my knowledge and belief as follows: it is a hybrid descendant, the pollen parent being the same as the pollen parent of the climbing rose commercially known as Golden Glow and the seed parent being the same as the seed parent of the climbing rose commercially known as Apricot Glow (Plant Patent No. 200). "

Which would be (Emily Gray x Dr. W. Van Fleet) x (Mary Wallace x Unknown).

I cant find a Brownell rose to match this. The color is stated as an admixture of rose violet, red, strawberry pink, and salmon orange. Semi-double. Climbing????
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
Frederick S. Peck?
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Michael Garhart
Looks like it! Thanks! I went through so many of these to see if any were missing, looking to see if Break o'Day had a patent (didnt find one.. :[ )
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
A pleasure. There is a list of the patents in the early American Rose Annuals that I can look up if ever you need to find one.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by Michael Garhart
I was searching through the oldest USPTO's inventory listing. It's very cumbersome, and i didn't find a patent for Break O'Day. Don't ask me why I considered it an important mission lol. Well, actually, I recall now.

Glenn Dale is a very important rose in breeding. It is a wichurana that has produced much shorter roses, that carry both wichurana resistances and resistances from Rosa moschata that come through many generations of tea and china types. Further, non-genetic resistance of RRD was trialed for Lafter, which is a very close relation, with the same type of foliage, stems, and prickles. So it would be interesting to see the breeding pathway for Break O'Day to see if the unknown portion aided in the eventual equation that became Lafter, or if it was Glenn Dale doing 100% of the heavy lifting.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
I will respond to you further in 'Break o Day'.
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Discussion id : 115-034
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Initial post 2 days ago by Byrnes, Robert L.
Shouldn't the seed parent, Swany ® × Mozart, be listed as a first generation seedling under Swany?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Looking at the parentage tree pf HAVpip, I don’t think so. (But I could be wrong).
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Discussion id : 114-432
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Initial post 14 DEC by drogers
It is always good for rose growers to receive feedback on desired varieties. It is the customer that is the ultimate judge of what grows well and where. This knowledge from the customer helps the small rose nursery to make the best decisions as to what to grow, to maintain plants in commerce for the present and future generations. Without this feedback a truly deserving rose might be lost. As a result of this very thing we hope to have this plant available in 2019.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by viscount89
It is a WONDERFUL rose here in Atlanta too!
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