HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Search PostsPosts By CategoryRecent Posts 
Recent Questions, Answers and Comments
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by Hamanasu
I tried this rose three times. The first was an own-root plant of the bush. I was warned that it would be weak and take ages to mature (previous comments on HMF make this amply clear). After several years I gave up -- if in countries with decent sunshine it take 8 years for Devoniensis (bush) to come into its own, I figured life is too short to wait for the decades it might take in England. So the next attempt was with the climber. Again, the literature warned me, this time of the opposite problem (which I guess is only really a problem in a small (35sqm) container garden such as mine): the climber would be excessively vigorous. It was, even confined in a pot, and put most of its energy into throwing up canes rather than producing blooms. The canes also tended to blackspot badly and die back, so every year the plant expended energy in rebuilding itself with less than impressive flower displays. So the climber also went after a few years... Then, last year, I got a grafted plant of the bush, and a few short months later it is growing healthy and flowering well. I love the scent and look of Devoniensis and I'm glad I got a version of it that works in my climatic and growing conditions. I got my grafted plant from Loubert in France, right before legal changes came into effect (following from the Brexit vote) that made it completely impractical for private individuals in England to acquire plants from Europe.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 7 posted yesterday by Marlorena
I have clg Devoniensis, grafted... I've grown it before grafted too... it doesn't flower much in the first year, the first bloom I got from the first time I had this rose was on 30th July.. the one I have now in this garden has not bloomed yet, so maybe end of July I might get the first flower.. it's very vigorous after a slow start, and healthy..
I've never had the bush form...
REPLY
Reply #2 of 7 posted yesterday by Hamanasu
I think my problem with the climber, in addition to the blackspot -- or whatever disease it was that caused blackish/purplish blotches and dieback on the canes -- was my trying to grow it in a container, and having to prune it so that it would fit the space available. I think these two things combined set the plant back every year, not really giving it a chance to feel that it could afford putting energy into blooms rather than new cane growth. But I'm sure that if you can let it grow rampant (as it seems to want to) in a good ventilated place in the garden, after a few years you'll have a spectacular plant!
REPLY
Reply #3 of 7 posted yesterday by Marlorena
Yes, I wouldn't consider it suitable for a pot at all... you're better off with the bush form.. we don't see that one here nowadays. It's nice to have an historic rose in the garden..
REPLY
Reply #6 of 7 posted yesterday by Hamanasu
Marlorena, when the plant is larger I can share wood if you are keen to have the bush form (though the bush is hopeless on its own roots; a much better candidate for budding/grafting, if you know how to -- I never tried either myself).
REPLY
Reply #4 of 7 posted yesterday by Mila & Jul
...mine is also a grafted bush version from Loubert. I grow it in the garden, here south of Stuttgart. It suffers a lot from the spring freezes and then puts too much/too early energy in the blooms... interestingly, it manages every year a "come-back" - this time after going through -20'C in spring
REPLY
Reply #5 of 7 posted yesterday by Hamanasu
Wow, -20! I didn't think teas (even grafted teas) could manage that!
REPLY
Reply #7 of 7 posted yesterday by Mila & Jul
I have 2-3 dozen teas/noisettes in my garden (southern facing slope)...in my experience, teas can endure lower temperatures than one would expect. It seems that protection from sunlight/dryness due to wind exposure is more important to get them over the winter. Actually, many of them can deal better than many HTs with the nowadays drier summers, which is increasingly an issue here in Southern Germany. (I have lots of old fruit trees dying and problems establishing new ones if there is no water access) I guess the biggest temperature challenge is the up/down of our local climate, which results in too early shoots. With the climate changing, I am trying out new varieties every year - and also have many setbacks... Btw, in Sangerhausen, they also have several teas - and the climate there is even colder. I think they saw up to -25'C this spring.
REPLY
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by Unregistered Guest
Available from - Angel Gardens
angelgardens.com
REPLY
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by Kathy Strong
Rose Listing Omission

Old Tappan

https://forloveofroses.com/shop/mini-flora/ben-walrus/

(op Benardella 2018)

A full figured orange pink Benardella miniflora that was Code Named Ben-Walrus. It has outstanding form, high and tight centers combined with very good holding power. We project that Queens will be in this gorgeous rose’s future and expect to see it shown in challenge classes as well. Disease resistance is better than many and extremely good with a regular spray program.

Now carried by K&M Roses. Just got one.
REPLY
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by anonymous-382123
Rose Listing Omission

rosa blue saphir

Dear Jedmar
I have bought by baldur (NL) rose blue saphir.
There is not much to find about this rose I have a good photo.
Friendly gretig
Willy
REPLY
© 2021 HelpMeFind.com