HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Search PostsPosts By CategoryRecent Posts 
Questions, Answers and Comments by Category
Discussion id : 106-110
most recent today HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post today by Margaret Furness
This rose was found in the garden of a derelict cottage, which also had Aglaia, Lady Hillingdon, Dorothy Perkins, Ophelia, William Lobb, John Hopper and an invasive suckering gallica - not flowering at the time, but Charles de Mills is a common survivor in the Adelaide Hills. The China was growing about 2m up through a Japonica.
It was in a district which was hit hard by the Ash Wednesday bushfires of 1983; I don't know whether the garden was burnt. It is in a 30" / 750mm rainfall area, subject to El Nino droughts.
The garden and cottage have been replaced in recent years.
REPLY
Discussion id : 106-108
most recent today HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post today by Andrew from Dolton
Does anyone in the U.K. or Europe grow this rose?
REPLY
Discussion id : 106-097
most recent today HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by Unregistered Guest
Available from - Noack
http://www.noack-rosen.de
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted today by jedmar
Thank you!
REPLY
Discussion id : 105-985
most recent today SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 9 days ago by mmanners
Ethel was my grandmother. She lived about four miles north of New Bethlehem, in Clarion County, Pennsylvania (cold end of Zone 5a). This rose was tall enough that, as a child, we could run under it. It may be R. alba Semiplena, and they certainly look alike. But it seems to show a need for more winter chilling to flower than does the form of Semiplena commonly sold in the US. The house was built in the 1890s. We know the bush was there by the early 1930s.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 12 posted 2 days ago by Ozoldroser
Malcolm your rose is not Alba semi-plena as I know it. Growth seems to be different and the leaves are not dull grey green enough.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 12 posted 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
I have to disagree with Ozoldroser, it does look quite like 'Alba Semi Plena' or maybe 'Alba Suaveolens'. 'Alba Semi Plena' was used as a rootstock and often survives when the scion dies.
REPLY
Reply #3 of 12 posted 2 days ago by mmanners
It is in all ways identical to the typical R. Alba Semiplena grown throughout the USA, the UK, and France, except for the lack of flowers in Florida.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 12 posted 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It won't flower if the climate is too tropical, it needs a winter chill.
REPLY
Reply #7 of 12 posted yesterday by mmanners
Andrew -- That's the issue. Alba Semiplena purchased decades ago, from Roses of Yesterday and Today did flower regularly for us. Ethel Yount's White, grown in the same area, did not. That's the only reason we have not concluded that they are identical. So my assumption is that it's a slight sport for a need for a bit more chilling. EYW does bloom just 100 miles north of us.
REPLY
Reply #5 of 12 posted 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
It is typical of 'Alba Semi Plena' grown in the U.K. too.
REPLY
Reply #6 of 12 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Pat - it would be most interesting to see photos of your 'Alba semi-plena, uploaded into that file of course.
REPLY
Reply #8 of 12 posted yesterday by mmanners
Pat, not sure if you mean mine or Andrew's. But if mine -- I don't have photos of it. We quit growing it perhaps ten years ago since, while it did flower, the flowering season was so short that we could not justify keeping such a large shrub in our very public garden, where our administration expects lots of flowers. I'm sure I must have photographed it, but I don't know where (or if) I would have those photos, almost certainly on film rather than digital, at this point.
REPLY
Reply #9 of 12 posted yesterday by Margaret Furness
Neither, that was Patricia talking to Pat (Ozoldroser).
REPLY
Reply #10 of 12 posted today by Ozoldroser
I think it was the backlit photo that threw me. I can see it has the leaden grey green leaves now.
REPLY
Reply #11 of 12 posted today by Andrew from Dolton
'Alba Semi Plena' makes spectacular rose; growing 2 metres high and 2.5 metres across. The flowers are very pretty and have a wonderful fragrance. These are followed by prominent orange-red hips that persist until the end of winter. Alba roses seem to grow quite well in a cool wet climate. 'Alba Maxima' is just as rewarding. My plant originated as a sucker from a rose in a hedgerow near an old farmhouse where it grows 4 metres up into a tree.
REPLY
Reply #12 of 12 posted today by mmanners
Ah, yes, they really are that dull blue-green that you'd expect.
REPLY
© 2017 HelpMeFind.com