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Discussion id : 108-609
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Initial post yesterday by Witchy
I think the listed average diameter is incorrect. My blooms were definitely larger than 2.5 inches. I would guess at minimum 4 inches, but I didn't measure them. They were similar in size to Belinda's Dream, but a little larger.
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Discussion id : 108-599
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by CybeRose
The Rose Annual, pp. 135-136 (1972)
The Men behind the New Roses
Nigel Raban
In 1919 the first of his seedlings appeared in the shape of two small-flowered Poly. Poms, named 'Stadtrat Meyn' and 'Beauty of Holstein'. From the very beginning the firm's energies were concentrated upon the production of polyantha roses and this policy has continued to the present day, coinciding as it does with the commercial demands of the German market, which is for massed display rather than for individual blooms. As a result the breeding programme had a threefold objective: freedom of flowering,  resistance to disease and an ability to withstand the winter rigours of the north German climate. The chosen parents to produce this strain included R. microphylla (R. roxburghii), R. multibracteata, both giving strong growth and hardiness to their progeny and 'Baby Chateau', the early floribunda raised by Wilhelm Kordes, which contributed to the freedom of flowering. The most successful of this group of seedlings were 'Kathe Duvigneau', which received a Trial Ground Certificate in 1952, 'Tantau's Triumph' (1948) and 'Tantau's Surprise' (1951). These varieties are still to be seen as park bedding roses on the continent though they have been largely superseded in this country.
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Discussion id : 108-598
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by CybeRose
The Rose Annual, pp. 135-136 (1972)
The Men behind the New Roses
Nigel Raban
In 1919 the first of his seedlings appeared in the shape of two small-flowered Poly. Poms, named 'Stadtrat Meyn' and 'Beauty of Holstein'. From the very beginning the firm's energies were concentrated upon the production of polyantha roses and this policy has continued to the present day, coinciding as it does with the commercial demands of the German market, which is for massed display rather than for individual blooms. As a result the breeding programme had a threefold objective: freedom of flowering,  resistance to disease and an ability to withstand the winter rigours of the north German climate. The chosen parents to produce this strain included R. microphylla (R. roxburghii), R. multibracteata, both giving strong growth and hardiness to their progeny and 'Baby Chateau', the early floribunda raised by Wilhelm Kordes, which contributed to the freedom of flowering. The most successful of this group of seedlings were 'Kathe Duvigneau', which received a Trial Ground Certificate in 1952, 'Tantau's Triumph' (1948) and 'Tantau's Surprise' (1951). These varieties are still to be seen as park bedding roses on the continent though they have been largely superseded in this country.
REPLY
Discussion id : 108-597
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday by CybeRose
The Rose Annual, pp. 135-136 (1972)
The Men behind the New Roses
Nigel Raban
In 1919 the first of his seedlings appeared in the shape of two small-flowered Poly. Poms, named 'Stadtrat Meyn' and 'Beauty of Holstein'. From the very beginning the firm's energies were concentrated upon the production of polyantha roses and this policy has continued to the present day, coinciding as it does with the commercial demands of the German market, which is for massed display rather than for individual blooms. As a result the breeding programme had a threefold objective: freedom of flowering,  resistance to disease and an ability to withstand the winter rigours of the north German climate. The chosen parents to produce this strain included R. microphylla (R. roxburghii), R. multibracteata, both giving strong growth and hardiness to their progeny and 'Baby Chateau', the early floribunda raised by Wilhelm Kordes, which contributed to the freedom of flowering. The most successful of this group of seedlings were 'Kathe Duvigneau', which received a Trial Ground Certificate in 1952, 'Tantau's Triumph' (1948) and 'Tantau's Surprise' (1951). These varieties are still to be seen as park bedding roses on the continent though they have been largely superseded in this country.
REPLY
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