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Discussion id : 38-131
most recent 22 JUL 09 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 21 JUL 09 by Jeff Britt
Can someone tell me what a "hybrid polyantha" is or direct me to a source that will explain what it is (a reasonable and sensible explanation, if there is one). I hadn't even realized such a classification existed, until today. I'm always learning!
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 21 JUL 09 by Lyn G
Jeff........

You might check the GLOSSARY. There are a couple of references re: hybrid polyanthas. I doubt very much if this classification is in use any more. I have a hunch you may find the class mentioned in older rose books.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 22 JUL 09 by Jeff Britt
Lyn,

Thanks, I had forgotten about the glossary. In fact, I need to go back and find those additions to some of the entries I had noted earlier. I will send you those (with references) soon.

Jeff
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Discussion id : 35-671
most recent 18 APR 09 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 16 APR 09 by Simon Voorwinde
Can someone clarify for me the definition, in a botanical context, what the specific epithet 'Rosa hybrida' refers to? On ICON, the Australian quarantine (AQIS) import conditions database, under the genus Rosa it lists the specific Rosa species for which no permit for entry is needed when importing seeds into Australia (see link: http://www.aqis.gov.au/icon32/asp/ex_casecontent.asp?intNodeId=8609179&intCommodityId=25375&Types=none&WhichQuery=Go+to+full+text&intSearch=1&LogSessionID=0). On this list is 'Rosa hybrida' and my understanding is this term refers to any rose that is the result of species or hybrid crosses and so encompases all modern hybrid roses. I am wanting to import some seeds that contain Rosa persica genes many generations back and because the seeds contain genes from a species not listed (not listed as Hulthemia anywhere on the database either) on the allowable species list DAFF is telling me I will need to apply for permission to import and a full weed risk assessment will need to be done for it. My thoughts are that since the term 'Rosa hybrida' is already listed I don't need to worry about this and am free to import small numbers of these seeds without the associated red tape (and my other thoughts are that the person on the other end hasn't got a clue about what I'm asking and is hiding behind the legalese because it is the 'path of least resistance'). So I thought I'd ask the experts here what the actual botanical definition of 'Rosa hybrida' was before stating my case with DAFF/AQIS.

Cheers,

Simon

P.S. when trying to fit a category to this I was hoping there was a 'Rose Classification' category. Is this something that might be useful here?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 16 APR 09 by Cass
'Rosa hybrida' is a Latinized term for garden roses that are the result of hybridization.

I didn't see Rosa persica on the list, either. I'm not sure it matters. You will describe the seed you are importing as the seed of Rosa hybrida.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 16 APR 09 by Don H
>>You will describe the seed you are importing as the seed of Rosa hybrida.

Actually it may be necessary to determine exactly what Oz requires on the import permit. For my small batch of seed permit the USDA requires rose seeds to be labeled as "Rosa spp." because that's what the official regulations list as being allowed into the country. From my experience it is not safe to assume that whomever checks the ID will know enough to draw the conclusion that they are one and the same thing.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 16 APR 09 by Cass
Even worse, there is actually a species name, Rosa hybrida E.H.L.Krause. I know nothing about it. You can read the reference in IOPI. Query using Rosa Hybrida.
http://www.bgbm.org/IOPI/GPC/query.asp
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 16 APR 09 by Ozoldroser
Simon,
Looking at the site I see what you mean. I would suggest that you just get the people who are sending the seed to label it Rosa hybrida followed by the cultivar name or clone 1, clone 2 etc. A letter could follow by snail mail. Nothing surprises me with ICON.
Or if you want to make waves ring the ACT office 02 6272 3933 and speak to the people who make the rules or better still just do as above to keep that name on the list to use in future.
Depending where you are sourcing the seed just make sure that the seed is clean of any other plant matter, is in new packaging with the botanical name on the packet.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 18 APR 09 by Simon Voorwinde
Thanks for all the replies. Looking at that website reference Cass it looks like Rosa hybrida is a syn. for Rosa pendulina L. (http://helpmefind.com/plant/pl.php?n=5391) which is listed separately on the ICON database list. Don... see here's where the issue is. If the rose species appears on the list on the above link then one can import the seeds without a permit. Anyone in the U.S. can pop the seeds into an envelope and post small numbers of them here (so long as they make sure they are clean and free of soil etc) and they will go through without intervention. Nowhere on the that list does it mention anything about hybrids. It mentions Rosa x floribunda (whatever that is LOL)... so will probably go this pathway because they are descended from the Persian series from Mr Moore that contains floribunda cultivars. I have ordered 'Euphrates' this year but this rose is regarded as being almost completely sterile... so don't like my chances in using it in breeding. But will try anyway.
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Discussion id : 28-368
most recent 22 NOV 07 HIDE POSTS
 
Reply #1 of 0 posted 22 NOV 07 by Paeonia_Man
AKA Great Prosperity
AKA Rich Man
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