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Initial post 15 AUG 15 byjohnm99
Even though this is a relatively old rose, bred during the era of constant spraying, it really does live up to its name and is a delight. Just planted last fall, very good growth, health and reasonably normal flowering frequency - the bloom is really a "double delight" both in looks and the fragrance. Fragrance would be 5/5 for me - there are a couple of more fragrant roses, but not many. I will buy a couple more this fall.
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Reply #1 of 13 posted 6 OCT byLavenderlace
Would you mind recommending the few roses that you think are more fragrant? DD doesn't work with my other colors but I've been intrigued by all the positive fragrance comments. Thanks!
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Reply #2 of 13 posted 3 days ago byStrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Oklahoma is 10 times more fragrant than Double-Delight. Both of them have the sweet "lychee" fruit scent in alkaline clay. One bloom of Oklahoma is enough to knock your socks off. Double Delight scent is actually gone in cold weather, but vey strong in hot weather.
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Reply #3 of 13 posted 3 days ago byLavenderlace
Thank you! Even though I'm not a red person, I have Oklahoma and Double Delight now because of the fragrance reviews and have smelled their wonderful first blooms. I'm sure that both will improve with age but you are right. Oklahoma is definitely stronger. These reds are some of my few that are grafted but the nursery would never tell me what they were grafted on and of course, the Home Depot people don't know or care!
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Reply #4 of 13 posted yesterday byStrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Lavenderlace: Parole (Kordes Buxom Beauty) is extremely fragrant & huge bloom. It's purplish-pinkish. Saw that in a dinky pot at HomeDepot in hot & dry weather and it had 4 huge & very fragrant blooms. Came back a month later in week-long rain and it went down hill with blackspots, so I didn't buy it. I have a hunch that Parole likes fast-draining soil (sandy) and can't tolerate standing water. I fell in love with Parole's scent, but I am NOT thrilled about Oklahoma nor Double Delight, both smell like canned lychee.
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Reply #5 of 13 posted yesterday byjohnm99
Have to agree with all the fragrant rose selections. I think it is true to say that people vary a lot in what they find fragrant. I find this within my own family. Also, it varies plant to plant and day to day.

I grow Parole and love it. I haven't grown Oklahoma in 25 years but still remember its fragrance clearly - had to give it up because of disease - I think it is better in hotter climates

If you haven't tried Jude The Obscure you might enjoy it - the Manager at David Austin in England told me he rated it as the most fragrant of their roses - I love mine. My son rates it as my most fragrant but for me, on a good day a good bloom of Fragrant Cloud is so strong I can't smell anything else for a few minutes.

I have about 200 bushes all chosen for fragrant and these ones on this page are certainly near the top. Every year I buy more that are supposed to be very fragrant, and have to boot out the least fragrant ones to make space.

But sadly one of them are fragrant one bit right now - we are a month behind our usual weather and it will be a while before we see any blooms!
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Reply #11 of 13 posted yesterday byLavenderlace
Love, love, love Jude the Obscure and can't seem to stop buying him!
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Reply #6 of 13 posted yesterday byjohnm99
Oops typo- should be "none of them are fragrant right now!
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Reply #9 of 13 posted yesterday byLavenderlace
Straw, I actually bought a Parole over the winter, thank you! It's still in the pot until I can figure out what to do with the color. Only had a couple of blooms but the scent was pleasant.
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Reply #10 of 13 posted yesterday byLavenderlace
Straw, I actually bought a Parole over the winter, thank you! It's still in the pot until I can figure out what to do with the color. Only had a couple of blooms but the scent was very pleasant, though not too strong as first blooms can be.
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Reply #7 of 13 posted yesterday byNastarana
'Fragrant Cloud' really does live up to its' name. Also, 'Mme. Isaac Perierre', and I would guess, its' sport, 'Mme. Ernst Calvat' are famous for fragrance, as is SDLM if you live where it can be grown. 'Yolande de Aragon' also has a powerful fragrance.

'Mr. Lincoln' is known for fragrance; so are 'Othello', 'Evelyn', and 'Jude the Obscure', as mentioned above. I rather like 'Othelo's' thorny, much branching habit and rebloom is very good.
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Reply #8 of 13 posted yesterday byAndrew from Dolton
My grandmother grew both 'Fragrant Cloud' and 'Mme. Isaac Perierre'. They were both highly scented. Her soil was very chalky and alkaline. However, they were very disease prone, especially to blackspot, 'Fragrant Cloud' was an especially sickly rose but Perierre kept on going despite spending large periods of the summer with no foliage.
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Reply #12 of 13 posted yesterday byLavenderlace
SDLM grows great here but so far, she doesn't agree with my nose. And I can't believe that MIP hasn't been great for me yet either. I don't know if the scent hasn't developed yet, or if it's just me!

Mr. Lincoln smells much better to me at this point, thanks for the suggestions!
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Reply #13 of 13 posted yesterday byLavenderlace
Love Evelyn, thanks for the suggestions!
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Initial post 16 OCT 09 byDon H
The July 8, 1956 edition of The Saint Petersburg Times reported that the parentage of Sterling Silver was "a cross between the well known hybrid tea rose, Peace, and a grey blue-lavender rose called Morning Mist".

http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=888&dat=19560708&id=n9ANAAAAIBAJ&sjid=M3YDAAAAIBAJ&pg=5601,3780064
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 16 OCT 09 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Great information Don!

I thought 'Morning Mist' by Fisher might still be offered for sale, but when you go to the Brentwood Bay Nursery Website, it says they offer the Austin rose by the same name.

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/pl.php?n=38003

Apparently the Fisher version is out of commerce.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 16 OCT 09 byDon H
Morning Mist is a dead end as far as the lineage goes. Gladys listed it as a selfling of one of her other hybrids which she didn't name.

The roses that are listed in Gladys Fisher's patents are

Peace - patent 591, as female
Rapture - unpatented,as female
Rome Glory - patent 304,as male
Happiness - patent 911, as female
New Yorker - patent 823, as male
Golden Anniversary - patent 806, probably as female
Masquerade - patent 975, probably as male
Mission Bells - patent 923 as male
Talisman - unpatented, as female
R. M. S. Queen Mary - patent 249 as male
Rome Glory - unpatented, as female
Better Times - patent 23 as male
Orange Nassau - patent 350, as male
Floradora - unpatented as female
Fashion - patent 789 as male

Of these, Rapture is the only one that is a greenhouse rose and which looks to me like it might otherwise fit the bill as being grandparent to SS.
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 16 OCT 09 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Fascinating.

I would have bet money 'Grey Pearl' was lurking somewhere in the lineage of SS.

Mrs. Fisher must have been very pleasantly surprised when SS popped up.
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 27 FEB 10 by Unregistered Guest
hmmm.....I actually read an article somewhere.....in fact it was from a book about rose names, and it talked about gray pearl as being one of the parents of sterling silver. I think that lineage would make a lot of sense because gray pearl is a very weak rose and sterling silver is not a particularly good grower from a whole variety of reports. Mine grows reasonably well and is healthy. Go figure. I live in pennsylvania. Maybe my climate is well suited for it.
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 16 MAR 10 byDon H
Robert, it turns out that Morning Mist never made it to the marketplace. See

news.google.com/newspapers?nid=1876&dat=19560530&id=rmgsAAAAIBAJ&sjid=YMsEAAAAIBAJ&pg=2951,3561950

I think you are correct about Grey Pearl lurking behind Sterling Silver. My guess (yet again) is that Morning Mist was an OP seedling of Lavender Pinocchio. The timing was right, and you've pointed out elsewhere the ability of Lavender Pinocchio to pass along fragrance.
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 16 MAR 10 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Fascinating. I bet you're right.
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 17 JAN 12 by Rupert, Kim L.
The 1956 article said she'd not introduced it, however a bed of a lavender HT named Morning Mist grew at Rose Hills Memorial Park Rose Garden in Whittier, Ca until the late 1980s. I was permitted to take cuttings there several times and Morning Mist and Dennison Morey's Mountain Haze were two I tried to propagate and failed. They grew there until the rose gardens were removed and replaced with the Rose Hills Rose Trials.
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 17 JAN 12 byDon H
Wow. Any chance you took photos of Morning Mist?

I do hope somebody in a suitable climate preserves VID Sterling Silver after Vintage closes.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 17 JAN 12 by Rupert, Kim L.
Hi Don, unfortunately, I don't think so. I don't remember photographing it and when permitted to make a cutting run, I would have been armed with a specific list of material to gather and the supplies necessary to accomplish it. The garden was nearly seventy miles from home and rush hour traffic as well as time to process the material were taken into consideration. I most often didn't carry my camera with me for fear of dropping or otherwise damaging or losing it. Those times, I was on a "mission"! The more I dig into this, the more I'm beginning to wonder if what we have ISN'T Sterling Silver, but perhaps Morning Mist? Weak plant, too few petals, etc. You know how easily things are mistaken and confused in the trade. And, you've probably experienced any lavender rose being responded to as "LOOK at the Sterling Silvers!"
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 11 JUN 13 byBenaminh
Don, University of California Davis Foundation Plant Services has an extensive VID list and is offering virus indexed Sterling Silver cuttings and budwood:

http://fpms.ucdavis.edu/rose.html

As of 07/10/13, listed under "Custom Services," they charge about USD $2,000 to clean any rose variety of virus, but require three plants and two years' time.
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 16 MAR 10 by Unregistered Guest
Greast post Don! We should get someone to update that info. BTW, I found the book that said Grey Pearl was a parent. It's called: A Rose by Any Name: The Little-Known Lore and Deep-Rooted History of Rose Names
by Douglas Brenner and Stephen Scanniello.

I think your reference is much more reliable and accurate so I say we should definitely get that officially listed. (Nevermind, it already is.)

:) Thanks. Getting the lineage for this one is actually kind of a big deal, as almost all of the lavenders are derived from this plant it seems.
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Reply #12 of 12 posted yesterday byMichael Garhart
I don't really doubt the Peace heritage. Or the Grey Pearl heritage. But I almost want to say Sterling Silver is 1/4 floribunda, which makes me wonder about Fashion. An example: Peace x (Grey Pearl x Fashion).

By the way, here is the link to the passage mentioned:

books.google.com/books?id=anq6v1LekNIC&pg=PP1&lpg=PP1&dq=A+Rose+by+Any+Name:+The+Little-Known+Lore+and+Deep-Rooted+History+of+Rose+Names&source=bl&ots=uifWgQ-jh4&sig=UmI6I4Y92OqTcOuWXv1FUoDoF6g&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwie1vHjl83TAhVL5GMKHclwAmsQ6AEIUzAJ#v=onepage&q=sterling%20silver&f=false
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Initial post 2 days ago byGdisaz10
Is the rose really like Alba rose Amelia?
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Reply #1 of 2 posted yesterday byNastarana
The 'Celsiana' photos look a lot like my 'Amelia', which will be blooming in June.

I should be able to compare when they both bloom if they bloom at the same time.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted yesterday byGdisaz10
Thanks
Peter Beales inserts amelia in damask roses
Disease resistence is the same? And the bush?
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Initial post yesterday byGdisaz10
In my very moist garden is subject to rust
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