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Initial post 13 days ago byPatricia Routley
I will start a new comment as the older discussion was of considerable length, as is this comment.

Because of the various spellings of Thibaut / Thibault / Thibaud, I had a look through the Roseraie de l'Hay 1900 catalogue looking for similar names but only found:
p58. 'Mme Thiebaut Sine'. Leveque 1886 H.R.
p58. 'Mme Victor Wibaut'. E. Verdier 1854 H.R.
p59. 'Mlle. Clementine Ribault'. Ribault 1885 H.R.
p64. 'Pierre Liabaud'. Liabaud 1887 H.R.
p71. 'Ch. Reybaut' (inconnu) Tea.
p91. 'Mme. Andre Theuriet' l'Hay 1899 H.T.
....so no joy there.

Because of the lack of 'Mme Jules Thibaut /Thibault /Thibaud in the literature, I am wondering if if this could have been another of Nancy Lindsay's renamings. Looking at some dates:

1935 Allyson Hayward [in] Norah Lindsay. The Life And Art Of A Garden Designer
p190. [Norah visiting Johnny Johnston at Serre de la Madone in France] it has become twice as complicated as it was.... and too many pots in tiny gardens for my taste......
p195. At present there is nothing but red geraniums.....if he would only plant roses and jasmine.....

1946. Graham Stuart Thomas, Cuttings From My Garden Notebook
p146. James Russell and I [see 1959 note below] paid our first visit to Miss Lindsay's garden on June 30, 1946. The address was Manor Cottage, Sutton Courtney, Abingdon, Berkshire..... three of her main hunting grounds were Hidcote Manor (She was a friend of Lawrence Johnston) and ...... The thought-provoking names poured from her. For some years I was frustrated by these names because I could not find them in any of the old French books in my possession, nor in the Lindley Library. At length the reason dawned on me. Finding an unknown rose in an old garden without a name she let her fancy run free and coined a name for it. There were many others, all since resolved.

1946-47 RNRS Historic Rose Journal No. 37, 2009
Charles Quest-Ritson. ....there is a copy in the RHS Lindley Library of the slightly longer list that he [GST] issued the following year in 1946-47

1948 Allyson Hayward [in] Norah Lindsay. the Life And Art Of A Garden Designer
p243. Norah [mother of Nancy]] Lindsay died of cancer of the kidney on June 20, 1948.

1948. Graham Stuart Thomas - [in] The Graham Stuart Thomas Rose book
p6. The year 1948 was spent mostly in consolidating my own plants and getting to know the numerous varieties I had collected.

1949. Allyson Hayward. The Roses of Norah and Nancy Lindsay. [in] Rosa Mundi 2010 Vol 23, No. 2, p24
By approximately 1949, T. Hilling and others were carrying the [Nancy's] roses, and Nancy also began selling them directly from her Manor Cottage Nurseries. She produced a nursery catalogue titled Shrub Rose List describing her rose offerings

1949. The Gardeners Chronicle
p49 Long Barn Gardens, [Mulberry Green, Harlow, Essex] set out their attractive miniature rock gardens in pans, together with specimens of the Rose 'Madame Jules Thibaut'.

1958 Allyson Hayward [in] Norah Lindsay. the Life And Art Of A Garden Designer
p268 Lawrence Johnston 1871-1958. A close personal friend of Norah who often stayed with him at Hidcote and Serre de la Madone in France, he left the latter to Norah's daughter, Nancy.

1959
A November 20, 1959 invoice from Sunningdale Nursery shows the landscape manager of the nursery was James Russell and nursery manager was Graham Thomas. (See 1946, p146 above)

1962, January 20
An Australian nursery imports 'Mme Jules Thibaud' from Sunningdale Nurseries, U.K.

1963 Shrub Roses of Today
p147 'Deane Ross. Mme Jules Thibaud'. A sport from 'Cécile Brunner' very near to it, but of peach colour rather than pink. I have been unable to trace its origins.

.........................
Other references which may or may not be relevant:
2009 RNRS Historic Rose Journal No. 37
p9. Bunyard travelled widely in France and Germany looking for roses to add to his collection.
p10. Graham Stuart Thomas may have bought Bunyard's collection

Vita Sackville-West was a lifelong friend of the Lindsay family.

Somewhere I have read that Nancy Lindsay's father left her 100 pounds a year, and her uncle Peter (Norah's brother) bequeathed her Manor Cottage. She used the rear of the cottage as a small nursery. I didn't scribble down the name of the nursery but seem to remember it was something like the Cottage Nursery. She did put out a catalogue and if anybody can find one or two of these, they would be most interesting.
......................

It seems that we should call upon our English Heritage compatriots for any knowledge they may have of 'Mme. Jules Thibaud'.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 7 posted 5 days ago byOzoldroser
From the Librarian at Glasnevin Botanic Garden on 21.6.2017:
I have checked the T. Hilling rose catalogues for 1948-49, 1950-51, 1951-52 and 1959-60 and also the rose section in the hardy nursery stock catalogue.  I didn't come across anything with Mme Jules Thibaud/Thibault/Thibaut. 
REPLY
Reply #2 of 7 posted 5 days ago byPatricia Routley
And a friend has checked an undated, pre-decimal Nancy Lindsay's Manor Cottage Nurseries catalogue (probably c1960s) and there was no mention of 'Mme. Jules Thibaud'.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted yesterday byAllyson Hayward
From Norah Lindsay's biographer:
I have an original Nancy Lindsay Manor Cottage Rose List and cannot find any reference to Mme Jules Thibaud
REPLY
Reply #6 of 7 posted yesterday byAndrew from Dolton
Ms Lindsay seem to court controversy with almost every plant she names. Is she really reliable enough to be trusted?
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Reply #7 of 7 posted yesterday byPatricia Routley
I am very grateful for this information Allyson and may I ask if there was there any date on this List? You have written "approximately 1949" when she began her nursery but I don't know how long Nancy operated her Manor Cottage Nursery and if she produced more than the one catalogue. (I enjoyed your book on her mother Norah Lindsay. The Life And Art of a Garden Designer so much that I really hope you write another on Nancy.)
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 4 days ago byPatricia Routley
Another friend has advised that Jean Hillier has checked the Hillier Rose Catalogues from 1940 – 1949 and found nothing.

I note that Charles Quest-Ritson has written in the 2009 Historic Rose Journal No.37,
p8. Graham Stuart Thomas ....joined T Hilling & Co.... his brief in 1931 was to ..... Tommy Hilling promoted him quickly until Graham became his general manager.
p12 .....meanwhile Hilling's catalogue, presumably written by Graham....

p13. Nowhere in any of his works did Graham give credit for the true source of his old roses, though the hints are there if you wish to follow them up.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted yesterday byAndrew from Dolton
Thomas says "I have been unable to trace its origin" In my addition of Shrub Roses of Today.
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most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday byIka
I am sorry, I am convinced this is not perenial blue rose
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday bya_carl76
I can assure you that this is Perennial Blue - it does appear more pink this year, and my guess is that with all the rain, nutrients were depleted from the soil that made the blooms less purple than they usually are. Also, as the photo remarks state, I pruned it back to appear more as a bush than a climber. It is a freestanding plant so I can't allow it to ramble up anymore. The plus side of pruning it back so hard is that it was covered with more blooms than usual. Please remember that the colors of the blooms and even the shape of the plant of many rose varieties may be different due to environmental issues.

This plant was from a cutting provided by Kim Rupert about 5 years ago. If you take a look at the photos he has posted you can see what my plant usually looks like when allowed to climb and when in bloom.
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Initial post yesterday byLavenderlace
I have quite a few of these and so far, there have been plenty of blooms and very nice fragrance. But the blooms seem to shrivel in heat, don't always open in high humidity, and immediately shrivel up in the vase. Can anybody comment on whether this is just something that happens when they are new? Mine are all less than a year old, own-root, both in the pot and in sandy soil. Very vigorous otherwise.
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most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post yesterday byIka
This is not perenial blue rose, for sure
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday bya_carl76
I can assure you that this is Perennial Blue - it does appear more pink this year, and my guess is that with all the rain, nutrients were depleted from the soil that made the blooms less purple than they usually are. Also, as the photo remarks state, I pruned it back to appear more as a bush than a climber. It is a freestanding plant so I can't allow it to ramble up anymore. The plus side of pruning it back so hard is that it was covered with more blooms than usual.

This plant was from a cutting provided by Kim Rupert about 5 years ago. If you take a look at the photos he has posted you can see what my plant usually looks like when allowed to climb and when in bloom.
REPLY
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