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Initial post 2 days ago by Margaret Furness
The Rose Society of South Australia had a competition at their spring rose show, for the public to vote on their favourite scent of a dozen or so anonymous roses. Forget Me Not won (the competition included Pope John Paul II and Ispahan). I think though it is shameful that it has 9 names in addition to the breeder code.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted yesterday by Jay-Jay
I can imagine, that Line Renaud won the contest.
Over here still pumping out very fragrant flowers in fall.
The scent is complex and intriguing!
I didn't know, that it was also named Forget-Me-Not.
I had to look up that name.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Margaret Furness
Roses aren't supposed to be given names of other plants, but that guideline, like so many, is ignored. I assume the Forget-Me-Not name is the reason it was used as a fundraiser by the Alzheimer's Society in Australia.
I like forget-me-nots (Myosotis) but in Australia they can become invasive, like so many.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Jay-Jay
"Vergeetmenietjes" they are called in Dutch. (Translated Forgetmenots) And not for mourning, but not to forget some-one still alive. After a depart.
I saw them made of Murano Glass mosaic in a photo-frame, around a photo of some-one who died.
Myosotis is the Latin name, in France it is too called: ne-m’oubliez-pas. (Don't forget me)
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by Margaret Furness
I didn't realise that it was the same in French. Forget-me-nots were common in 19th century mourning jewellery in Britain (but I just had a look on E**y and there was almost nothing)..
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Reply #5 of 5 posted today by Jay-Jay
Like this-one, I meant Margaret: https://link.marktplaats.nl/m1202727162
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Initial post 2 days ago by NikosR
Is Albertine self cleaning or does it hold on its wasted blooms for the rest of the year? This is important to know for rampant ramblers like this if one does not feel deadheading a large rambler under the heat is an enjoyable passtime.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
The 2011 reference says:
" Later the bloom dies most ungracefully and hangs on to its dead petals. Not in a spreading way, but losing all oomph in the petal and just collapsing to hang like a wet dishcloth in the middle of the pretty cluster."

Nevertheless, I would not be without it.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Jay-Jay
The dead flowers hang for a while, but after a while, when the hips swell, the petals disappear. But maybe that was due to a lot of rain and wind.
Will observe this next year.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
If you blast the bush with a leaf blower it will remove a lot of the dead flowers. This also works quite well for Camellias.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted today by Margaret Furness
Interesting thought. Someone advised me to deadhead a "ground-cover" rose with a golf-club.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted today by Jay-Jay
hole in one!
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Initial post today by Alexday
It's overall an alright rose... Looks kind of awkward as it blooms in clusters on top, maybe it is wrongly categorized as a hybrid tea?? No fragrance to speak of which is disappointing as it was labeled as "moderately strong". It can look red sometimes. A healthy rose, but if I knew it was not fragrant I wouldn't have bought it.
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Initial post yesterday by Eisrose
Rose Listing Omission

Mascaret

New variety for 2017/2018 season.
http://www.roses-orard.com/rosiers-a-fleurs-groupees/356-mascaret.html
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Reply #1 of 1 posted today by Patricia Routley
Thank you Eisrose. 'Mascaret' added.
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