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'Dorothy Perkins' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 94-120
most recent 10 JUL 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 JUL 16 by pkalisz
Charles Quest-Rison. Climbing Roses of the World, p.135. "It is ironic that the most successful seedling of 'Turner's Crimson Rambler' should have been brought into this world with a false declaration of parentage. Jackson & Perkins described 'Dorothy Perkins' as a seedling or Rosa wichurana crossed by the pink Hybrid Perpetual ' Mme Gabrielle Luizet', but the similarity to 'Turner's Crimson Rambler' was noted immediately. There was lively correspondence in many horticultural journals (especially in France) which pointed out that crosses between R. wichurana and Hybrid Perpetuals had produced very different roses with much larger flowers and concluded that the similarity of 'Dorothy Perkins' to 'Turner's Crimson Rambler' was more than a coincidence... It is best to think of 'Dorothy Perkins' as the pink counterpart of 'Turner's Crimson Rambler'."
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Reply #1 of 14 posted 27 JUL 16 by Patricia Routley
I think Mr Quest-Ritson might be right. But it is interesting to note how the glandular pedicel, matt leaf and upright growth of 'Turner's Crimson Rambler' was subdued by R. Wichuraiana to produce a smooth pedicel*, glossy leaf and sarmentose growth in 'Dorothy Perkins'. Many thanks for adding this most interesting reference pkalisz.

(*i am sure 'Dorothy Perkins' has a smooth pedicel, but it is the wrong season for me to go and double check.)
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Reply #2 of 14 posted 7 JUL 18 by Palustris
"Hairy" pedicels are a characteristic I use to rule out DP when trying to identify a small pink rambler.
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Reply #3 of 14 posted 7 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
'Excelsa' is smooth as well. 'Turner's Crimson' has surprisingly small bristles but it is covered with them.
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Reply #4 of 14 posted 8 JUL 18 by Patricia Routley
Thanks to you both. I have added "smooth pedicels" to the main page for both 'Dorothy Perkins' and 'Excelsa'.
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Reply #5 of 14 posted 8 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
And 'The Fairy' needs a shave.
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Reply #6 of 14 posted 8 JUL 18 by pkalisz
I have two rambler roses that I propagated from bushes gowing at abandoned house sites here in central Kentucky. Both of these have bristles/glands on the pedicels (hard to see in the pictures). These roses are similar but differ in gross appearance, flower color and phenology. I always suspected that the second photo is DP. However, it is possible that both or neither is DP. They may also be wild DP hybrids. (I also posted the photos with my comment of 26 July 16)
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Reply #7 of 14 posted 8 JUL 18 by Palustris
Neither looks like DP to me. The first is too dark a color to be DP and too pink to be 'Excelsa'. The second looks like the flower is too large but about the correct color. Both are very nice roses and once they are more mature might be easier to identify. A great find!
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Reply #8 of 14 posted 9 JUL 18 by Margaret Furness
It might be worth looking at "Hawthorndene tennis court south rambler"for the first one, but I can't see how pale the petal reverses are. See the comparison scan of leaves of DP and "Hawthorndene".
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Reply #9 of 14 posted 9 JUL 18 by Patricia Routley
Nope. Not the same My Jan 2009 comment for "Hawthorndene Tennis Court South Rambler" says it has smooth pedicels.
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Reply #10 of 14 posted 10 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
The rose being grown in the U.K. as 'Dorothy Perkins'. The receptacles and pedicels are smooth.
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Reply #11 of 14 posted 10 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
'Excelsa', the plant on the left is from a plant 10 years old whilst the one on the right was found in a long abandoned garden. Most flowers have white streaks in their petals, the receptacles and pedicels are smooth.
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Reply #12 of 14 posted 10 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
The rose I am growing as 'Crimson Shower'. The receptacles and pedicels have bristles and flowers at least a week later than Perkins.
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Reply #13 of 14 posted 10 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
A found rose with smooth receptacles and pedicles.
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Reply #14 of 14 posted 10 JUL 18 by Andrew from Dolton
All four together, 'Dorothy Perkins', 'Excelsa', 'Crimson Shower', foundling rose.
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