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'James Mason' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 122-579
most recent 12 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 JUL by kazanlik
Hello Mrs. Routley, the sterilityt betriften only the Scarlet Fire heat as a mother plant. As a pollen donor it is an extremely fertile rose.
In terms of content, I was concerned that James Mason is more likely to be the result of a reverse cross, i.e. more likely to be Tuscany superb x Scarlet Fire.
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Discussion id : 122-564
most recent 12 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 JUL by kazanlik
Tuscany superb x Scarlet Glow . One of the James Mason ( Scarlet Glow x Tuacany superb ) very similar rose.

Scarlet Glow (Hybrid gallica Kordes) single and large flowering hybrid. Makes very beautiful pear-shaped rosehips. But the nuts are sterile. Over 300 stratified nuts (from different years) have not produced a single seedling in 4 years. Several attempts to crossbreed Scarlet Glow x Tuscany superb have not produced any rose hips.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 12 JUL by Patricia Routley
And yet Pirjo Rautio in Finland had some success with ‘Sonja Marie’ and ‘Viggo’ in 2009, both said to be seedlings of ‘James Mason’.
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Discussion id : 122-565
most recent 11 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 JUL by kazanlik
Tuscany superb x Scarlet Glow . One of the James Mason ( Scarlet Glow x Tuacany superb ) very similar rose.

Scarlet Glow (Hybrid gallica Kordes) single and large flowering hybrid. Makes very beautiful pear-shaped rosehips. But the nuts are sterile. Over 300 stratified nuts (from different years) have not produced a single seedling in 4 years. Several attempts to crossbreed Scarlet Glow x Tuscany superb have not produced any rose hips.
REPLY
Discussion id : 114-913
most recent 15 JAN 19 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 15 JAN 19 by StefanDC
In my garden near Washington, DC, this rose is not as free from black spot as it seems to be for some others, although it is still a rather tough and vigorous survivor. The flower color is fairly rich, but I am disappointed in the faint fragrance (I don't understand how this variety could ever be noted as having a strong fragrance, and I have a pretty sensitive nose.) It is a fairly tall plant and is armed with strong prickles relative to its gallica relatives. I have never seen fall color develop on its foliage here. All in all, I would characterize this as a sturdy shrub best suited to providing early summer color in a large garden space, with plenty of other companion plants to provide interest when it isn't in bloom.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 15 JAN 19 by Patricia Routley
And certainly don’t put it in on its own roots. Mine was purchased in 2008 and was supposed to be on multiflora rootstock. It obviously wasn’t.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 15 JAN 19 by StefanDC
Absolutely--if you can get it grafted (and live in a place where permanently grafted roses work), that's the way to go to avoid suckering. My 'James Mason' has been just moderately spreading by suckering in heavy soil. Around here, suckering is a behavior that I quickly learned to tolerate and even encourage because it serves to keep many roses from dying out entirely; leaving graft unions exposed above the soil line in our area can be a death sentence due to stem girdler (bronze cane borer) and canker diseases.
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