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'Tamora' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 115-744
most recent 16 MAR 19 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 16 MAR 19 by Sophia's Roses
Can anyone compare the attributes of Tamora and Evelyn? I live in zone 9, East Bay Area, California. I am most likely to plant them in containers. Thank you!
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Discussion id : 62-222
most recent 1 JUL 17 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 24 FEB 12
* This post deleted by user *
Reply #1 of 10 posted 24 FEB 12 by Nastarana
That beautiful apricot color fades fast in hot sun.
You might want to try for afternoon shade.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 24 FEB 12 by Tammy-EastTN-6a
Thanks for the tip. I'll remember that when I go to plant her :)
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Jay-Jay
I went out to look at Tamora, but only the lower part(20cm) of the plant has thorns/prickles, but not very much or big! At least not spectacular in numbers or size. Higher up it has some prickles; You might even call this rose almost thorn-less.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Landperson
Interesting, Jay-Jay. Check out this pricle-picture of my Tamora
http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.192346

How does that compare to yours?
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Jay-Jay
Take a look at the pictures I uploaded today. It's very variable!
But Westerland, Moonlight (Kordes) Polka (Cl.) and Crimson Cascade are much worse!
Or see Fellowship, William Lobb. (See my earlier pictures)
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Tammy-EastTN-6a
Landperson, your picture looks like the cuttings I rec'd...I rec'd multiple pokes right through my gloves when I was getting them ready to try to root them last week.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Tammy-EastTN-6a
Sorry, This was the initial post. I deleted it in error.
"I'm surprised nobody has mentioned the fierce thorns! I just received some cuttings, and I think they are some of the longest and most abundant of my 250+ roses! Thankfully, the blooms make up for it!"
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Lyn G
Tammy....

You might want to look through all of the COMMENTS on the rose page for Tamora. Some site users have said that this rose has left them bloodied. We also warn that the rose is "armed with thorns" on the main rose page.

This may be one of those roses that are variable when it comes to prickles. I know I didn't even think that was possible until I found one rose while pruning at the SJHRG heavily armed with thorns/prickles on one side of the canes and very smooth with few thorns on the other side of the same cane ! Whoa ! I stopped pruning and started checking out other roses in the garden.

I found that altho' that rose may have been an extreme example of the variability of prickles on a rose, there were several other roses that did not show consistent thorn distribution on their canes, too.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 25 FEB 12 by Jay-Jay
You're right on top of it, for that was what I meant with the photo's Lyn!
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 26 FEB 12 by Lyn G
Jay-Jay....

After I had posted my COMMENT, I did see your photos and thought to myself that you had the perfect photos to show that prickles, even on the same plant can be variable. Thank you for posting them because I found it hard to describe what I had remembered but your photos truly show the variability of this plant characteristic.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #11 of 10 posted 1 JUL 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you, jay-jay, for the info. on thorns.
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Discussion id : 94-154
most recent 31 JUL 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 30 JUL 16 by raingreen
In my area (inland southern California) sun scald is a bugaboo on rose canes, but Tamora is resistant---nice to see healthy canes after a couple of 100 F+ hot spells!
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 31 JUL 16 by Jay-Jay
Good to hear, for in Europe it is almost not propagated/sold by nurseries and getting scarce (maybe even on the nomination of getting extinct). Austin doesn't stimulate/advertise this rose and isn't selling it any more (by their website).
For me, it was hard to get! It stays very small over here: max 2 ft.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 31 JUL 16 by raingreen
Hi Jay-Jay! Yes, even here in soCal it is small, I'm not where I can check plants but Clair Martin says 3.5 ft/1 meter. I like it because it's a winter bloomer, tho not as good as Charles Rennie Mackintosh for that trait (another plant that also stays small here, from the couple of plants I've seen).
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 31 JUL 16 by Darrell
In the northern Bay Area where I live, my Tamora is four feet tall, plus, and it's withstood drought, disease, and neglect. Wonderful rose. Scented as well.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 31 JUL 16 by Jay-Jay
Scented with mostly Myrrh!
Good to hear there are places, that this rose is cherished, thrives and gets a bit taller.
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Discussion id : 33-757
most recent 24 JUN 16 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 8 FEB 09 by John Fison
Tamora.

This rose is stated to b highly disease resistant. Well, maybe it is in some locations. For nearly two years now, mine have been badly infested with black spot despite my (somewhat erratic) attempts to control it. This despite an open location with excellent air circulation. Currently, they are almost completely defoliated. and I have recently started a very aggressive spraying program. It's not just me. There has been a plague of black spot all over Texas. Why? Don't know. I am in Houston (Zone 9a), with hot and humid summers.

J.F.
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 17 MAY 09 by Unregistered Guest
I HAVE SEVERAL TAMORAS IN MY GARDEN AND I AM QUITE PLEASED WITH THEM. HOWEVER, CONTRARY TO POPULAR BELIEF MOST ROSES ARE NOT HOT CLIMATE PLANTS. BY THAT I MEAN THAT MOST ROSES GO INTO A DORMANT STATE ABOVE APPROXIMATELY 85 DEG F. MY ARDEN IS LAYED OUT SO THAT ALL MY ROSES GET SHADE AT THE HOTEST PART OF THE DAY AND DIRECT SUNLIGHT ONLY IN THE EARLY MORNING AND AFTERNOON. ALMOST ALL ROSES ARE FUNGUS SESCEPTABLE, INCLUDING BLACK SPOT, AND DO NOT BELIEVE ANY LIE TO THE CONTRARY ! ! ! YOU MUST USE A FUNGICIDE ! ! ! TWO GOOD ONES THAT I HAVE AND ARE CURRENTLY USING ARE HONOUR GAURD (PROPICONIZOLE CONCENTRATE) WHICH I HAVE FOUND TO BE THE BEST AND ORTHENEX BY ORTHO, ALSO A PESTICIDE. IN A CLIMATE LIKE YOURS YOU MUST SPRAY EVERY 7 DAYS ! ! ! I KNOW WHAT I AM TALKING ABOUT. MY GARDEN CONSISTS OF ABOUT TWO HUNDRED ROSES THAT BLOOM BEUTIFULLY AND CONSISTENTLY. MY KNOWLEDGE HAS BEEN GAINED BY GARNISHING FROM BOOKS WHAT IS TRUE, GETTING RID OF WHAT IS NOT TRUE AND BUILDING ON THAT KNOWLEDGE BASE. JUST REMEMBER NOT ALL INFORMATION CONTAINED IN BOOKS ABOUT ROSE GROWING IS TRUE ! ! ! SOMETINES PEOPLE ADD INFORMATION TO BOOKS WITHOUT DETERMINING IT'S VALIDITY. GOOD LUCK ! ! !
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 17 MAY 09 by Margaret Furness
From the perspective of one who worries about the planet: a plant that needs weekly spraying isn't worth growing. There is also your own health to consider. I garden in a mediterranean climate, but if I were in a black spot zone, I'd look for roses that weren't susceptible, or choose something other than roses. I don't use pesticides in my rose garden, either. It's possible to buy natural predators.
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 14 MAR 11 by CarolynB
I totally agree! It's wonderful to grow beautiful flowers, but not at the cost of what weekly spaying is likely to do to your neighbors' health and your own health. It's better to choose roses and other plants that are disease resistant, and rarely if ever need spraying.
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 29 JUL 14 by nbate
I have Tamora growing beautifully in only 3 hours of sun, 11:45 - 3:00. I spray with Heritage and Mancozeb every 2 or three weeks. I live near Indianapolis. Tamora produces, 7 or eight blossoms with each flush. It died down to the bud union last winter, so I am thrilled with it now. I prune to less than a foot after a blossom is spent. I grow it in a pot on a terrace. The fragrance is very strong and unusual.
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 23 JUN 16 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Nearby rose park has Tamora and they didn't know that Tamora like it alkaline .. they put sulfur on Tamora .. that broke out in blackspots immediately. Their Tamora is grafted on Dr. Huey (that rootstock likes alkaline clay). Their Tamora bed is a blackspot fest, after granular sulfur application, despite spraying. There's really no point in spreading sulfur when the pH of rain is 5.6, quite acidic. Rain on the east coast is even more acidic, google "acid rain" and you'll see the effect on plants.

See "Environmental reasons for NOT spraying" in Organic rose forum. From May 13, 2013 research article : "New research published in the Journal Neurology further supports the link between pesticide exposure and Parkinson’s disease.
http://ecowatch.com/2013/05/30/pesticide-exposure-increases-risk-parkinsons-disease/

Besides the fungicides maneb and mancozeb (UP the disease by 33 percent to 80 percent), another pesticide is linked to Parkinson's disease:
"New research shows a link between use of two pesticides, rotenone and paraquat, and Parkinson's disease. People who used either pesticide developed Parkinson's disease approximately 2.5 times more often than non-users.

The study was a collaborative effort conducted by researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), which is part of the National Institutes of Health, and the Parkinson's Institute and Clinical Center in Sunnyvale, Calif."
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 23 JUN 16 by Patricia Routley
I would like to point out that this site is specifically devoted to roses.
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 23 JUN 16 by Give me caffeine
Fair point, but if people are taking risks by spraying said roses then pointing out the risks is probably not out of line. I think it could fairly be included under rose cultivation.

Although interpreting scientific studies can be more complex than some would like it to be.
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 24 JUN 16 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thank you, Give me Caffeine for your fairness. Yes, I did talk about Tamora rose. A safer approach would be using dolomitic lime (has both calcium and magnesium) for roses that like alkaline, rather than spraying with chemicals.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 24 JUN 16 by Give me caffeine
I wouldn't argue that dolomite isn't safer. I'm not sure how good the available studies on fungicides and pesticides are though. Methodology is going to be critical to getting useful results there. For a start, it'd be almost impossible to find a group that used one compound* but didn't use others. You'd also have to account for all sorts of lifestyle and genetic factors that could have an effect.

*I'm not keen on the word "chemicals". I regard it as basically meaningless. For example, is NaCl a chemical or not? What about KCl? What about HCl? What about KCSN? By what standard would NaCl from some sources not be "a chemical", while HCl from some sources would?

Really, all the most people mean by "chemical" is "something I don't like the sound of, and probably don't understand anyway".
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