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'Susan Louise' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 105-472
most recent 11 SEP 17 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 10 SEP 17 by Give me caffeine
I've moved my Mystery Beastie photos here, as it has now been identified as 'Susan Louise'.

I have a question about pruning: about how much can safely be removed from this rose?

The reason I ask is that the growth has been rather sparse and open, so I'd like to persuade it to bush up a bit. It's currently making new foliage for spring, so this seems to good time to trim it. If I do it now, it should have enough foliage by summer to give the branches some shade.
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 10 SEP 17 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
"growth has been rather sparse and open"

Yes, this is normal for this one.

It really prefers to be near the ocean. The further inland you go, greater the chance for burning. Yes, best to prune before it gets hot. Canes do sunburn.
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Give me caffeine
Doesn't seem to burn where I am (about ten miles inland). It's generally very appealing, but just lacks a bit of substance.

Is it possible to get it a bit bushier, or is it determined to be sparse no matter what?
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I've never seen it dense.

When it's happy it's a huge informal mass of upright sticks, pendulous twigs and blossoms.

Ten miles inland is still relatively near the coast. You've got higher humidity, coastal influence in the weather.

I'm saying it does not like dry heat as a rule and exposed wood will burn.

I kept it alive for several years but it was never happy for me. Nearer the coast it can be glorious but it doesn't appreciate hard pruning.
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Give me caffeine
Ok, thanks for that. I might not worry about it then. Better happy than knackered.
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I just went back and noted Margaret's photo.

Hers has been pruned up.

The best specimems I've seen here were allowed to have branches all the way to the ground.
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Give me caffeine
I'm happy to let it branch to the ground (it already is) but I'd like it as bushy as the one in that shot. Maybe if I just tip it fairly lightly, say around 10% or so.
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Reply #7 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Yes, just some light shaping and plenty of space is all it needs.
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Reply #8 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Give me caffeine
Plenty of space could be a problem. I ordered Souvenir d'un Ami, but Susan Louise was what turned up. So the space was worked out for Sd'unA, around 2.5 metres across. Susan Louise will have to keep most of its roots within that limit.

But we like it a lot anyway, so if it sulks about the restriction I'll get another one and give it some acreage. Come to think of it, may do that even if the first one doesn't sulk.
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Reply #9 of 9 posted 11 SEP 17 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I think you'll be ok. Tends to be more upright.
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Discussion id : 98-350
most recent 2 APR 17 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 APR 17 by Give me caffeine
Can someone give an opinion on how spikey this thing is? The available photos are not definitive in this respect.

If it's fangless, or almost, that would tie in with my Mystery Beastie.

Also, opinions on scent would be useful.
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Discussion id : 89-638
most recent 6 DEC 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 DEC 15 by CybeRose
American Rose Annual, p. 208. (1932)
Susan Louise. H.Gig. (Charles E. Adams, 1929.) Stocking says it is a joy to all who have grown it and a constant grower and bloomer.
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Discussion id : 89-637
most recent 6 DEC 15 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 DEC 15 by CybeRose
Roses of Monterey: a book for rose lovers, p.18. 1933
Frances E. Lester
SUSAN LOUISE, Originated by Dr. Adams, of San Jose, Calif., seedling of Belle of Portugal; a very strong growing New Rose of much merit; beautiful long buds and very fragrant, well formed light pink flowers borne continuously all through the season.
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