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Rose Woods
 
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Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
More Stone Rail garden roses
Uploaded 26 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
The natural vegetation consists of coniferous forest on the slopes with mixed oak and evergreen woodlands, chaparral and meadows. Four rose species are native to these mountains: Rosa spithamea, Rosa sonomensis, Rosa gymnocarpa and Rosa californica but only californica was absent from our property though we have introduced multitudes of californicas from all over the state.. Planted gardens are scattered within 20 acres which we deerfenced. We have a pond and irrigate from a well. Photo taken June 11, 2011 at Rose Woods.
Uploaded 7 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
Stone Rail garden
Uploaded 9 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
An earthquake fault named the Maacamas passes diagonally through our land. Unlike the nearby San Andreas fault which is a slip/slide fault, the Maacamas is a thrust fault creating an upper Napa plate passing into Napa Valley and a lower Sonoma plate sinking beneath the Mayacmas Mtns. This Maacamas fault passes from left to right through the center of this photo. The exposed tuff and ash are the upper Napa plate and the foreground Meadow covers the lower Sonoma plate. Photographed June 10, 2011 at Rose Woods.
Uploaded 7 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
C
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
Many of the roses burned by the fire are resprouting. Our name “Rose Woods” reflects the dominant plants we grow, roses, of course, and many species of trees, especially oaks from around the world. Wild roses are my first love so i’ll begin this tour with a collection in a garden section called the Stone Rail.named for a layer of rock from the tilted-up sandstone beds ( dating from 140 to 20 million years ago ) that make up the western flank of the Central Valley at Lake Berryessa. This is the lowest point of our land often wet and watery in winter so appropriately the hedge of wild roses growing above the rock is from a Darlingtonia bog in Trinity county. Called the “Peafruited” rose for its clusters of rounded, pea sized hips, the scientific name is Rosa pisocarpa A. Gray 1872. Few flowers are visible, it's just beginning to bloom on this 1st day of June, 2021. Also part of this hedge are Rosa rudiuscula and Rosa serafinii with Rosa glauca at the base of a Burr Oak from the eastern U.S.
Uploaded 7 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
On the left, Michael Tallman, then Don Gers and friends at Calaveras Big Trees where we found Rosa calvaria Greene in August, 2015.
Uploaded 6 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
Each garden has a name reflecting some special plant or feature. After 47 years we’ve had many successes but probably an equal number of failures. And in October of 2020 the Glass Fire, named for a prominent aboriginal location where it started, a mountain of obsidian glass located east of the town of St. Helena and burning 27,310 hectares, ravaged two thirds of our 22 hectares but fortunately much of our 20 planted acres and home were spared. Devastating and heartbreaking, not only for us but many of our neighbors lost everything!
Uploaded 7 JUN
Rose Woods garden photo
Garden photo courtesy of Rosewild
Rare snow on Mount Saint Helena to the north, the remnant of an extinct nearby volcano. Rising to over 4000 feet, this volcano is part of a chain reflecting global plate tectonics where the collision of the North American land mass with the floor of the Pacific Ocean created the landscape we see today. Photographed February 5, 2019
Uploaded 6 JUN
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