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CarolynB
most recent 30 SEP SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 OCT 08 by Leslie Davis
I think Moonstone is a beautiful rose and I just had to have it for my garden. I was disappointed to find out it doesn't do well in the hot summers of the valley. First the aphids and then the thrips ate it up and then the blistering heat took over for the next 4 months. Oct now and I'm just getting some decent blooms again after 5 months. I would caution anyone who lives where it gets above the 90's from obtaining this rose, unless you're willing to wait for those few months it isn't that hot and you don't mind thrips damage in the months they're present.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 17 DEC 10 by Penelope
Too bad. This was on my "Gotta Have it List". Our summers here in Dallas are just like yours, generally getting to around 105 in August. I think 108 was our high last summer.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 17 DEC 10 by Lyn G
Leslie.....

Thank you for sharing this information. I have added that "this rose prefers cool climates" to the rose page so that other site guests will have the information when they are making their purchasing decisions.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 17 DEC 10 by Rosaholic's Southern California Garden
Hmmm-- this rose does not like MY cooler climate. It thrives in East San Diego in my mother's garden, but here on the coast, most blooms ball up and refuse to open.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 17 DEC 10 by Lyn G
Should I also add "prefers dry climates" ? It's possible that 'Moonstone' can't take the prolonged heat of the central valley of California, but can handle the coastal heat of areas like San Diego ?

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 17 DEC 10 by Rosaholic's Southern California Garden
I actually think that what this rose needs is heat . . .
I'm really surprised to see someone saying it does NOT like heat.
It does really well at the rose shows in the desert areas.
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 12 AUG 15 by boopie
I agree that this rose can take the dry heat. I live in zone 10 in So Cal and this rose is one of my better performers in the late summer months. Half of my roses I summer prune in August as they just don't perform well in the heat. But this rose produces reliably beautiful blooms, growing in full sun. I have a Francis Meiland growing next to Moonstone. Depending on the time of the year, it is hard to tell them apart. But in the heat Francis looses it form, becomes bleached out and just ugly. So I prune Francis in August, but I let Moonstone bloom all summer. In cooler weather I think it is a nice rose bush, but I think it's strength is in how it handles the summer heat. Very nice rose for cutting, and it keeps its form and color in my garden in the heat, when other roses can't.
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Reply #11 of 10 posted 30 SEP by fieres
My Moonstone in Malta (Europe) stands up to the summer heat well which varies from 90 to 98 during the day. Actually it is the only rose that continues on blooming (albeit with smaller blooms) during this heat when all the other roses take a rest, I water it twice a week and feed it once every two weeks. It faces east and has sun from morning (about 7.00 am) till 1pm thus avoiding the afternoon sun altogether
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 27 AUG 12 by CarolynB
Are you saying that Moonstone doesn't do well when temperatures are in the 90s? Or that it does well in the 90s but it doesn't do well when temperatures are in the 100s? I live on the borderline between the central valley and the east bay area, and I'm wondering if this would be a good area to grow this rose. Our summer temperatures are usually in the 90s, but only get into the 100s occasionally for a few days at a time.
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 27 AUG 12 by Lyn G
Carolyn...

It's hard to say if the rose will do in your garden. It has take me years to find the roses that can handle my heat, which is in the high 90s and low 100s for most of the summer months.

What I have found is that most roses will crisp when it gets to 100+. i looked at the roses that managed well in my heat and found that roses that had thick petal substance were the roses that held up to the heat the best. The patent on Moonstone says that the petal substance is medium-thick.

I'd suggest you look around your garden and determine which plant characteristics work best for you and use that as a guideline for selecting new roses.

Smiles,
Lyn
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 12 AUG 15 by Nastarana
You might want to consider what exposure would be best. When I gardened in the Central Valley, I found that only the toughest roses, like 'Manchester Guardian Angel' could tolerate a west exposure, with its' hot, dry winds. I wonder if 'Moonstone' might be best placed to the north side of your house or the east. If you are like me, the east side is prime real estate which fills up fast.
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most recent 5 APR 19 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 19 MAR 13 by goncmg
The colors in this rose are just so attractive---here in Columbus, OH 6a it tends to be a warm, earthy pink with somewhat deeper reverse and some orange shadings. The color is not unlike Tournament of Roses or Duet which are, for better or worse, far stronger varieties in my opinion. Oh, I DO like Catalina! I also tend to have a soft heart for roses bred between 1950 and 1980. Which is WHY I like Catalina---to me it just doesn't read like a "modern" rose. The color can be similar to Helen Traubel, not off Tiffany, close to Duet (all 1950-60ish), and moreover, the stems and canes tend to be thin-to-wirey (remind me of Gay Princess, 1967), the blooms could use a few more petals (think of those gorgeous HT's from the 30's with intense, unique colors but always so limp in the bloom). And finally, it blackspots horribly even with moderate spray here in Ohio's hot/wet summers. A novice grower might be unimpressed/discouraged by this one---Tournament of Roses or Duet would be much better for a newer grower...........
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 22 MAR 13 by CarolynB
Very helpful and interesting comments -- thanks!
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 5 APR 19 by Matt's Northwest Florida Garden
I ordered this from J&P this year, hope it does well!
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most recent 29 DEC 18 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 3 OCT 08 by CarolynB
Roses Unlimited just told me they stopped selling Bonnie Rosalie this season, due to lack of demand. Does anyone know of another source still selling it?
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 3 OCT 08 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Not at this time. If you contact me directly I can try to propagate it for you if interested. Thanks, Robert
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 29 DEC 18 by viscount89
Are you still propagating this rose?
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 29 DEC 18 by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I sent cuttings to some folks in WA state recently. It's cut back for the Winter again now however.
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most recent 22 OCT 18 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 15 APR 12 by Linda1989
I have had this rose for at least 6 years. It was one of the original regular roses I purchased as I used to be strictly into minis. It has been growing in a partially shady area (shade tolerant) with very little care. I am not on a strict fertilizing schedule and Honey Bouquet just carries on as a very healthy rose regardless. Very pest resistant (aphids and earwigs seem to ignore). Honey Bouquet can be surrounded by other plants suffering from rust and blackspot and for whatever reason, she is impervious. Blooms are generous in a brightly delicious butter with more of a golden honey centre. Foliage is thick and nice dark green. Fragrance is strong and delightful. Makes an excellent cut rose, easily lasting a week or more. It is BY FAR one of my all-time favourites. (One of Zary's best, I think).
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 11 SEP 14 by Ranger6
liked your review so much that I just ordered one from roses unlimited own root. thank you for your excelledt description of why you like the honey bouquet. it sure convinced me, and I needed the help.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 11 SEP 14 by CarolynB
Thank you for your review of Honey Bouquet. It's very helpful to hear of people's experiences with a particular rose. This one is going on the "wish list". I don't know where I'd put it at this time, but we'll see...
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 22 OCT 18 by Plazbo
Got it this year and it just had it's first bloom today so may be a bit premature but it does seem the BS resistance is pretty high here as it's around quite a lot of it and unaffected (so far anyway).

maybe I spoke too soon...while it's not blackspot the plant is showing some sort of leaf disease now, possibly downy or anthracnose....something causing irregular browny green splotches.

on a tangent it's flower buds are very fuzzy/glandular, feels a bit like felt but isn't visible.
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