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Damian Brodie
most recent 21 NOV 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 19 NOV 14 by Damian Brodie
I have this rose & have met the dog it was named for several times & both are beautiful!
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
Hopefully, someone will be willing to share photos of it so the rest of us can enjoy it, too!
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Damian Brodie
I'm onto it Kim! Watching my plant of 'Gypsy's Gold' closely for the right moment to get pics. Things are only just starting to move here but when they do I plan on having the camera out & ready to go!

The Australian introducer of 'Gypsy's Gold' (Roses & Friends) - who I bought my plant directly from - has a nice photo of this rose on their site. Shame it didn't make it as far as here...
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
Thank you sir! I wonder if the originator might find it beneficial to place his photos of the rose here to help advertise it?
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Damian Brodie
I grow a lot of roses but this is definitely one that deserves to be better known & more widely grown (joining roses such as 'Eyes for You', 'Blue for You', 'Firestar' & 'Home Run' as being the top performers for my area). I'm actually glad you made your comment after mine Kim as I am now more determined than ever to give this rose the recognition it deserves.

All too often I am guilty of thinking that if the raiser & introducer can't be bothered putting their rose/s "out there" then why should I bother? But, they might well have their reasons for why they have not & at the end of the day I am all for pointing out the great roses.

'Gypsy's Gold' was my wife's choice from the nursery but we have both grown to love it! :-)
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
I seriously doubt many who know of Help Me Find, realize what a tremendous advertising and marketing tool it CAN be. Just as we eat with our eyes first, we also plant our gardens and select our plants with our eyes. Few are interested in obtaining anything until they actually SEE it in living color.
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 21 NOV 14 by Damian Brodie
Very true!
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most recent 12 NOV 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 12 NOV 14 by Damian Brodie
Great photo Simon. Such an eyecatching rose!
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most recent 31 OCT 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 31 OCT 14 by Damian Brodie
Such a beautiful rose and one I would not like to live without! My plant of 'Lilac Charm' is still a bit off blooming so I enjoyed this latest batch of photos from you Kim.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
Thank you, Damian. I've grown it own root for too long, so this summer, I budded it. This is a three month old, budded plant. I don't think I will ever waste my time and energy on it as an own root specimen again.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Damian Brodie
My plant is budded and still isn't that strong so I can only imagine 'Lilac Charm' on its own roots.

I once had 'Silver Charm' because I was told it was a better grower than 'Lilac Charm' (didn't seem to be for me) but imo 'Silver Charm' simply wasn't anywhere near as beautiful as 'Lilac Charm'.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
I imported Silver Charm from LeGrice in Britain back in the eighties. I only had it budded on their stock, which was never "happy" in my savannah to mid desert conditions. It seemed to have denser foliage, larger, a bit more double flowers and was pretty. I can't imagine it being an "improvement" over Lilac Charm being half Sterling Silver, though Seven Seas was a decent plant and a lovely, nicely scented lavender here.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Damian Brodie
'Seven Seas' looks like a very nice rose Kim. It would be interesting to see what 'Lilac Charm' could do with a more modern mauve rose such as 'Neptune'.

I have some nice enough 'Lilac Charm' seedlings here atm but those that have bloomed have nothing on it. Maybe one of the couple yet to bloom will give it a run for its money! :-)
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
Unfortunately, I believe Lilac Charm has been superseded as a breeder. It's huge fault here is the proclivity to mildew. It is intensely fertile, making many very viable seeds, all of which appear to germinate and produce mildewy offspring. Neptune has overcome the mildew issue here. Crossing the two wouldn't produce an improvement over Neptune and would probably reduce its health. Lilac Charm used to be one of my "go to" breeders for difficult pollen, until I tired of dealing with generations of mildewed seedlings. I've questioned the stated parentage for years. Back in the late eighties, I raised a sample of the cross Dairy Maid X Lavender Pinocchio, many of which resembled Lilac Charm greatly. And, yes, Seven Seas is one of the best of the Harkness results from their Lilac Charm work.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Damian Brodie
Seedlings from 'Lilac Charm' crossed with 'Eyes for You' were terribly mildewed here (each & every one of them & there were quite a few) & other crosses involving 'Lilac Charm' have definitely been mildew prone as well so you are right on the money Kim but I have a couple of 'Lilac Charm' seedlings that have made it to 18 months so far without a hint of PM. Unfortunately, these ones have also not had a hint of a bloom either...always the way! LOL

I agree with your points regarding 'Neptune'. Still, I'd love to see the results mainly to see what colours pop up! :-)
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 31 OCT 14 by Rupert, Kim L.
I'm not surprised by the mildew from the Lilac Charm and Eyes for You cross. Eyes for You and Bull's Eye are related seedlings. Eyes doesn't mildew here, but it also produces too few Grade 1 plants for commercial introduction where Bull's Eye cooperated. Week's trialed both here and introduced the mildewed rose (Bull's Eye) because they could produce it appropriately. So, there is the proclivity in the line. It seems Lilac Charm just brings it out. LeGrice wrote that crossing mauve X mauve "homogenizes" the genes, producing heavily greyed whites. Paul Barden archived his article here. (Thank you, Paul!)

http://www.paulbardenroses.com/legrice1.html
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most recent 31 AUG 14 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 31 AUG 14 by Damian Brodie
I am a big fan of 'Blue for You' & I'm certainly drawn to this rose. It is like "warmth" was added to the "icy cold" bloom of 'Blue for You' through very clever breeding (that's the way I see it anyway lol). Great photo of a perfectly named rose!
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