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Lee H.
most recent 3 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Michael, have you grown this rose? It is a beauty here for me. Wondering about its disease resistance in your area.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 4 days ago by Michael Garhart
No idea why HMF doesnt tell me comments like this come up. Sorry for the delay.

No, I rejected to grow it based on its lineage. All 3 roses are major BS magnets here, although Daybreaker is a real do'er. It may be better suited to your climate.

Stainless Steel, in particular, is a nightmare here. Although I love the blooms.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 4 days ago by Lee H.
Michael, you might click on your account button, and make sure the email address is correct, and under “preferences”, that the message post notification is ON.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 4 days ago by Michael Garhart
Weird, it was turned off. Ive had it on and same issue though. We'll see if it works again.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 4 days ago by Kathy Strong
I sent you a private message in July 8 re one of your comments. Did you get it?
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 3 days ago by Michael Garhart
Did now!
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most recent 10 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 MAY 22 by Michael Garhart
I feel confident that this rose is from Graham Thomas, or at least a near-Charles Austin descendent. I think GT is correct, though. I am unsure what else this rose could be.

Grew it when it was new, it mildewed, and I dumped it. I have had both Yellow Brick Road and Yellow Submarine for more than a decade now, and I find them far more preferable.
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 8 MAY 22 by Palustris
Are you asserting it is from Graham Thomas or from 'Graham Thomas'?
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 9 MAY 22 by Patricia Routley
Mr. Graham Thomas was not interested in breeding roses I understand. He died in 2003.
Michael would have been referring to the <2007 rose ‘Graham Thomas’.
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 9 MAY 22 by Lee H.
Patricia, I wonder then if we should reconsider his profile statement in HMF: “Rose and peony author and breeder” ?
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 9 MAY 22 by Patricia Routley
Yes of course. Breeder deleted. Thanks Lee H.
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 9 MAY 22 by Michael Garhart
Yes, sorry, from the rose of that name.
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 10 days ago by Michael Garhart
No, I said I feel like it is, not that I know it is.
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most recent 13 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 JUN by JenniferinMI
Hello,
I am also 5b and was wondering if your Nightmoss was still doing fine? I've had mixed responses when inquiring if it's fine for zone 5b. You seemed to be the only cold zone person with one, so I thought I would inquire if yours was okay before ordering one.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 14 days ago by KYBungalow
Hello! I am actually NewDawn Also known as vapor vac At the garden web. I just maintain the site for freedom gardens. I would suggest emailing Peter Schneider directly. I think his email address is At the combined rose list.com. If it isn't I will see if I can scrounge it up. He has a couple of them in 1 of them here response to more often but . If it isn't I will see if I can scrounge it up. He has a couple of them in 1 of them here he responds to more often but he will get back with you about that. I hope that helpsI see you also helps the question on The garden web so hopefully someone might be able to help you there also.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 14 days ago by KYBungalow
This is a site for my friend Who lives in Kentucky. I put his garden in and maintain it. I know it's confusing. I know it's confusing. He no longer has nightmares to my knowledge. And I actually don't remember planting it there.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 14 days ago by KYBungalow
I lost access to my new dawn site so now I see it is directing me to the Kentucky bungalow site. Sorry about the confusion. I do maintain peter Schneider site though at freedom gardensTo my knowledge he still has To my knowledge he still has nightmares So as I mentioned So as I mentioned prior So as I mentioned prior I would try contacting him directly.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 14 days ago by Lee H.
Thanks for clearing that up.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 13 days ago by JenniferinMI
Thank you, I will go ahead and try one in my zone 5b garden.
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most recent 13 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 MAR 06 by Liesbeth
"Trinity", Tea, should be classified as Bermuda Mystery Rose, not a Bermuda Rose. It is what is called a Found Rose in the USA.



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Reply #1 of 13 posted 13 MAR 06 by HMF Admin
I'm not sure I understand about this one, "Trinity (Tea, Bermuda Rose)" is already classified as a found rose on HMF - note both the found rose designation and the name is enclosed in double quotes. We do not have a class called Bermuda Mystery Rose, rather we use the combination Bermuda Rose and Found Rose to indicate such. Do you see this as a problem - we would be interested in your opinion.
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Reply #2 of 13 posted 22 JUN by scvirginia
The O.P. (sadly now deceased) was Liesbeth Cooper, the rosarian from Bermuda who studied, preserved and helped establish this 'class' of roses. If she thought the class should be called Bermuda Mystery Roses instaed of simply Bermuda Roses, her opinion should have some weight.
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Reply #3 of 13 posted 23 JUN by Patricia Routley
I believe the class of Bermuda Rose should be deleted altogether from the selection of Old Garden Roses. In this case to leave just the two classes of Found Rose, and Tea.

In Australia, the foundlings are not classed as Australian Rose; nor in England as English Rose, etc.
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Reply #4 of 13 posted 24 JUN by scvirginia
I can't tell you how often I've searched for roses using that classification. And now I can't.

Having a "class" for found roses for a large country like Australia or the U.S. doesn't make sense, because there are so many different climates, and so many different foundlings of different types.

Bermuda, however, is a small island and if I want to search for a tough rose that is tolerant of heat and humidity, these roses are pretty much guaranteed to do well in my growing conditions.

I would really love to be able to search for found roses by country or climate.
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Reply #5 of 13 posted 24 JUN by Lee H.
I rather agree. Peter Beales dedicated a bit of space to them in Classic Roses, and they are detailed in that book as a class under Chinensis by the President of the Bermuda Rose Society, Lorna Mercer.
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Reply #6 of 13 posted 25 JUN by Patricia Routley
There is no doubt in my mind that Bermuda Rose is not a Class of Old Garden Roses - despite being offered as a Class by HelpMeFind.
Old Garden Roses:
Agatha/Agathe
Alba
Ayrshire
Bermuda Rose
Bourbon
Bourbon, Cl.
Boursault
Centifolia

The Classes of roses grown in Bermuda are teas, chinas, hybrid perpetual, rambler, noisettes, etc. and found roses.

If a list of roses grown in that country is required, then I suggest adding synonyms of "Bermuda whatever" to the few that lack that prefaced name.

You can certainly search for found roses by country or climate:
Use Advanced Search, select Found Rose, and under Origin, select country.
Also using Advanced Search, under Growing, one can search using the hot climate Zones.
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Reply #7 of 13 posted 25 JUN by scvirginia
You wrote: "If a list of roses grown in that country is required, then I suggest adding synonyms of "Bermuda whatever" to the few that lack that prefaced name."

Adding "Bermuda whatever" to the names of the roses that don't already have it is gonna be tricky unless we already know which roses need these synonyms. Before you deleted all the roses from this category, did you check to be sure they all had 'Bermuda' somewhere in the name?

Did you check with whoever added this category to HMF in the first place? Somebody went to some trouble to add the category to HMF, and then to add the relevant roses.

FYI, I just did a search for found roses with Bermuda as the country of origin, and the search returned five roses. When I searched for found roses in India, I got one hit.
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Reply #8 of 13 posted 25 JUN by jedmar
I disagree with this one-sided deletion. "Bermuda Rose" might not be a class as defined by ARS, but it is a well-known term within the World Federation of Rose Societies since at least 1987, and supported by several publications and articles. From the Foreword of "Roses in Bermuda Revisited": ... our many "Mysteries", some of which have been accorded the ultimate accolade of simply being known as 'Bermuda' roses.
Bermuda's special climate has preserved many long-lost Teas and Chinas. It is of interest to researchers to have these specifically mentioned. The reference that there is no class of Australian or English found roses is not relevant, as those terms are already captured by Ausbred roses and English roses (by Austin).
Such a move should have been the result of a proper discussion, taking into account of the opinions of members from the Conservation & Heritage community, especially from Bermuda.
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Reply #9 of 13 posted 27 JUN by HMF Admin
This is one of those issues where further input from the HelpMeFind rose community is requested/welcomed.

On the surface, it centers around contrasting opinions of experts presenting very cogent arguments for their positions. Should the Bermuda rose class be included as an official designation for Old Garden Roses? From a purely technical standpoint, it may not be appropriate but it's use has been accepted by other noteworthy references for some time.

Strict factual vs historic/commonly accepted representation is not a new issue for HMF and as a mutable resource we are able to best address this type of controversy. Often the solution is as easy as tracking down the source of misinformation and making the appropriate correction on HMF. Those are by far the most satisfying but sometimes it's not possible to readily ascertain which conflicting resources/opinions are "correct". In these cases, the best we can do is document the differing opinions.

In this instance, it may be best resolved with some sort of compromise. Maybe we need an official "Bermuda" class designation along with a new "Bermuda (historical)" class or possibly a thorough explanation of our use of the Bermuda class designation.

We invite comments from the community.
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Reply #10 of 13 posted 27 JUN by HubertG
My two cents for what it's worth ...
They aren't strictly a class of rose in the sense that (as Patricia rightly points out) they incorporate other classes of roses like Teas, Chinas, Hybrid Teas etc, etc.; they are more like a category or subset of various classes.
However I think it's useful knowing where these found roses originated and so having the prefix "Bermuda" attached to those roses which don't already have that makes the best sense to me. Just like all the roses found at Bishops Lodge at Hay, New South Wales have the prefix "Bishops Lodge" attached to them to designate their special origin.
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Reply #11 of 13 posted 27 JUN by HMF Admin
Very helpful, thank you.
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Reply #12 of 13 posted 1 JUL by jedmar
Marijke Peters, President of the Bermuda Rose Society writes on June 28, 2024:

"The problem is that Bermuda roses are not classified except as Bermuda roses. If someone wants to compete there has to be a class for it. Please keep it as it was."
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Reply #13 of 13 posted 13 days ago by scvirginia
I find it a useful category, and I don't see how anyone is harmed by keeping things as they were.

For the BRS, it is a class for rose shows, and I wouldn't be astonished to hear that some rose societies in Florida or the Caribbean use it as a class in their shows. Some American nurseries use it as a category also.

HMF has an explanation of the Bermuda Mystery Roses already—it's in the glossary.
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