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Ozoldroser
most recent 28 OCT HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 27 OCT by HeathRose
Could any one point me in he right direction towards identifying this rose? It had a beautiful rugosa like scent. Very compact looking shrub and the tiniest rose leaves I’ve ever seen.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 27 OCT by Ozoldroser
Yes one of the pimpinellifolia roses. maybe 'Irish Rich Marbled'
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 28 OCT by HeathRose
Thank you Ozoldroser - I will explore pimpinellifolia roses. Much appreciated
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most recent 21 OCT SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 12 OCT by Ozoldroser
I am wondering if "Range View Pink Tea" might be 'Belle Emilie' which was on a circa 1860 Evandale Nursery catalogue (Evandale Nursery was within 1km of the family property where the rose was found growing). Also previously listed on this listing was 'Devoniensis' which was also found on this property 100ks NE of Adelaide, South Australia.
I also found the following on Trove on 'Belle Emilie': https://webarchive.nla.gov.au/awa/20131211003619/http://pandora.nla.gov.au/pan/122951/20131211-0821/hortuscamden.com/plants/print/rosa-belle-emilie.html
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 13 OCT by Patricia Routley
'Belle Emilie' was certainly available from South Australian nurseries Pat. I have added a couple of more references.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 13 OCT by Ozoldroser
Thank you so much Patricia. I am getting kind of excited that this might be its name.
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 13 OCT by Patricia Routley
I am too. It certainly sounds right so far.
I have just added a photo of "Mystery Cream Tea" in my garden today. Not half as vigorous as yours but I am so happy to have it. It is feminine and delicate and possibly so very old.
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 20 OCT by Patricia Routley
Some people have noted a likeness to Devoniensis 1838. I don’t see that. For me ‘Devoniensis is flat, with many pleated petals.

I see a likeness to the nodding rose which came as “Agnes Smith” from Araluen in 2004. This rose has paled from pink to cream in a more sunny position. However there is still more pink in it than in “Mystery Cream Tea” I think the prickles of "Agnes Smith" are smaller too. See my “Agnes Smith” photo 460-000a
[Later edit - I have just realised that in 2017 I planted another bush of “Agnes Smith” from Araluen, right next door to “Mystery Cream Tea”.]

I also see a likeness in the bush (but not the bloom) of the fragile ‘Rival de Paestum’ 1839

I note ‘Belle Emilie’ was 1829..
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 20 OCT by scvirginia
I'm awake too early, but 'Innocente Pirola' was a popular rose that was sometimes compared to 'Devoniensis'... only, was it popular in Oz?
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 20 OCT by Margaret Furness
Innocent and feminine it ain't, with those prickles.
I've received what I think is this rose as Niphetos, but it isn't that either.
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 20 OCT by scvirginia
Ha! So not 'IP', then...

How does it compare to 'Catherine Mermet' and her sports?
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 20 OCT by Ozoldroser
Personally I feel that the rose is an earlier rose than Devoniensis. Why? It is lighter weight and bush overall, branches thinner, petal substance is thinner and it does not have the more ordered arrangement of flower form and the overall impression is earlier in development.
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 21 OCT by scvirginia
Wouldn't it be loverly if 'La Sylphide' isn't actually extinct? Another oldie that might deserve a look-see is 'Elise Sauvage'.
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 20 OCT by Ozoldroser
'Innocente Pirola' was in several Australian Rose Catalogues and gardens and after reading references and seeing photos on HMF I am wondering.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 21 OCT by Patricia Routley
Pat, I take it that you have seen the refs in COMMENTS. I’ll move them soon. (I am in my summer regime of out there at first light and in the cool. I am just in for a breakfast break)
Ellen Perman did another painting of ‘Innocente Pirola’ and it seems rather too upright. Search the internet for
innocent Pirola Ellen Perman
and you should find it. The URL was one of those impossibly long ones.
There is also something in the refs about the bud unscrolling,
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Reply #12 of 12 posted 21 OCT by Ozoldroser
Comparison photos of "Range View Pink Tea" and 'Devoniensis' added today.
Plus a bush photo
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most recent 9 JUL SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 22 JUL 08 by Ozoldroser
Selection from R. chinensis cv. 'Old Blush'
In 1979 seedlings were raised from a fruit of 'Old Blush' and resulted in the selection which was informally named 'Beauty of Glenhurst' by Trevor Nottle (1983). The vigorous and floriferous selection has a sparse bluish foliage and shrubby erect habit about 2.5 metres tall. Flowers are borne in trusses and are single, open deep magenta pink and fade paler. The selection is fertile and also strikes readily from cuttings, its erect habit and constitution making it suitable for hedging.
It was named for the garden in which it was raised at Gumeracha in South Australia. The cultivar is not dissimilar from R. cv. 'Sanguinea'."
'New Cultivars Selected from Seedlings of Old-fashioned Roses' by June and Brian Morley. The Australian Garden Journal Vol. 8 No. 3. Feb/March 1989
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 7 JUL by Plazbo
It's likely the Australian factor but its interesting that they specify it's fertile and yet has no listed offspring.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 8 JUL by Ozoldroser
I have planted seeds of my Beauty of Glenhurst but so far nothing to show yet.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 8 JUL by Damo
FWIW I have a few seedlings out of 'Beauty of Glenhurst' (from using its pollen in crosses & from OP seed). I haven't used it much & nothing that has resulted has been very interesting but it's definitely fertile both ways.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 9 JUL by Ozoldroser
I forgot about one plant that I named for my mother with a study name - "Eunice Perkins". It was a OP cross between 'Beauty of Glenhurst' x 'Albertine' -it was a small double light pink with the perfume of Albertine.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 9 JUL by Damo
'Beauty of Glenhurst' x 'Albertine' seems like a great match. My best seedling involving 'B of G' is 'Route 66' x 'Beauty of Glenhurst', a nice China-type rose with a purple bloom (see photo). I have also uploaded a photo of the OP 'Beauty of Glenhurst' seedling I have kept.
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most recent 4 JUL SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 JUN
* This post deleted by user *
Reply #1 of 14 posted 30 JUN by Ozoldroser
Does your rose have a lighter reverse to the petals as the picture of Charles Wagner has darker reverses? Have you access to any old nursery catalogues from your region as that might be a help to know which roses came to Uruguay?
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Reply #2 of 14 posted 30 JUN by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
I don´t have one. The reverse is light, but in the picture isn´t possible to see it. Do you know it?
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Reply #3 of 14 posted 1 JUL by Margaret Furness
There were so many HPs released. Have a look at Reynolds Hole (Trouillard 1861).
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Reply #4 of 14 posted 1 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
In internet, I found this Reynolds Hole, it´s diferent.
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Reply #5 of 14 posted 2 JUL by Margaret Furness
Good luck with finding the name for your rose!
Margaret
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Reply #6 of 14 posted 2 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Margaret there are 2 Raynold Hole, Do you know the both?
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Reply #7 of 14 posted 3 JUL by HubertG
Your last photo looks more like 'Mrs. Reynolds Hole'.
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Reply #8 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
The one bred by Trouillard might be the rose sold in Australia and elsewhere by mistake as Mrs Reynolds Hole (Rockhill has written an article about this recently). No roses named just Reynolds Hole are sold in Australia (my country) now.
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Reply #9 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
I found two roses in HMF, what do you think about them? First: Reynolds Hole - Trouillard 1861, second: Reynolds Hole - Paul 1872
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Reply #10 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Margaret, do you speak about RH Trouillard 1861?
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Reply #11 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
Yes, the RH Trouillard 1861 is the one that looks like the rose sold in error now as Mrs Reynolds Hole. Rockhill said that it could be another similar Bourbon or HP - there were so many released - but it isn't the true Mrs Reynolds Hole, which should be a Tea.
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Reply #12 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Do you know it?
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Reply #13 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
I grow the rose sold as Mrs Reynolds Hole - it looks like the picture of RH Trouillard 1861, and grows like a Bourbon. It smells too good for a Tea. Photos below in my garden.
The article is on pages 30-33 of https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-1342545091/view
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Reply #14 of 14 posted 4 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Dear Margaret, thanks for the bibliography sent. The rose that you cultivate would be Mrs Reynolds Hole? The shape of the flower is a little different from that of the drawing: in one case it is herged and in the other it is not. On the other hand, in the drawing it would seem that the inner petals do not open.
Is it possible that Reynols Hole and Mrs Reynolds Hole are different roses?
The article says that "it is very similar to Catherine Guillot B", and it looks like her rose. Do you think your rose could be Catherine Guillot?
The shape of the plant is very similar, and the flowers are not vertical. I add photos of Catherine Guillot
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Reply #15 of 14 posted 4 JUL by Margaret Furness
The rose that I grow is sold as Mrs Reynolds Hole, but it is not correct: it is not a Tea.
I don't know enough about HPs and Bourbons to guess at what its true name is - as I said, there were so many! I think that Catherine Guillot is darker than my rose, in your photos.
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