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Ozoldroser
most recent 9 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 22 JUL 08 by Ozoldroser
Selection from R. chinensis cv. 'Old Blush'
In 1979 seedlings were raised from a fruit of 'Old Blush' and resulted in the selection which was informally named 'Beauty of Glenhurst' by Trevor Nottle (1983). The vigorous and floriferous selection has a sparse bluish foliage and shrubby erect habit about 2.5 metres tall. Flowers are borne in trusses and are single, open deep magenta pink and fade paler. The selection is fertile and also strikes readily from cuttings, its erect habit and constitution making it suitable for hedging.
It was named for the garden in which it was raised at Gumeracha in South Australia. The cultivar is not dissimilar from R. cv. 'Sanguinea'."
'New Cultivars Selected from Seedlings of Old-fashioned Roses' by June and Brian Morley. The Australian Garden Journal Vol. 8 No. 3. Feb/March 1989
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 11 days ago by Plazbo
It's likely the Australian factor but its interesting that they specify it's fertile and yet has no listed offspring.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 10 days ago by Ozoldroser
I have planted seeds of my Beauty of Glenhurst but so far nothing to show yet.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 10 days ago by Damo
FWIW I have a few seedlings out of 'Beauty of Glenhurst' (from using its pollen in crosses & from OP seed). I haven't used it much & nothing that has resulted has been very interesting but it's definitely fertile both ways.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Ozoldroser
I forgot about one plant that I named for my mother with a study name - "Eunice Perkins". It was a OP cross between 'Beauty of Glenhurst' x 'Albertine' -it was a small double light pink with the perfume of Albertine.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 9 days ago by Damo
'Beauty of Glenhurst' x 'Albertine' seems like a great match. My best seedling involving 'B of G' is 'Route 66' x 'Beauty of Glenhurst', a nice China-type rose with a purple bloom (see photo). I have also uploaded a photo of the OP 'Beauty of Glenhurst' seedling I have kept.
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most recent 14 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 29 JUN
* This post deleted by user *
Reply #1 of 14 posted 30 JUN by Ozoldroser
Does your rose have a lighter reverse to the petals as the picture of Charles Wagner has darker reverses? Have you access to any old nursery catalogues from your region as that might be a help to know which roses came to Uruguay?
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Reply #2 of 14 posted 30 JUN by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
I don´t have one. The reverse is light, but in the picture isn´t possible to see it. Do you know it?
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Reply #3 of 14 posted 1 JUL by Margaret Furness
There were so many HPs released. Have a look at Reynolds Hole (Trouillard 1861).
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Reply #4 of 14 posted 1 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
In internet, I found this Reynolds Hole, it´s diferent.
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Reply #5 of 14 posted 2 JUL by Margaret Furness
Good luck with finding the name for your rose!
Margaret
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Reply #6 of 14 posted 2 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Margaret there are 2 Raynold Hole, Do you know the both?
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Reply #7 of 14 posted 3 JUL by HubertG
Your last photo looks more like 'Mrs. Reynolds Hole'.
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Reply #8 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
The one bred by Trouillard might be the rose sold in Australia and elsewhere by mistake as Mrs Reynolds Hole (Rockhill has written an article about this recently). No roses named just Reynolds Hole are sold in Australia (my country) now.
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Reply #9 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
I found two roses in HMF, what do you think about them? First: Reynolds Hole - Trouillard 1861, second: Reynolds Hole - Paul 1872
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Reply #10 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Margaret, do you speak about RH Trouillard 1861?
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Reply #11 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
Yes, the RH Trouillard 1861 is the one that looks like the rose sold in error now as Mrs Reynolds Hole. Rockhill said that it could be another similar Bourbon or HP - there were so many released - but it isn't the true Mrs Reynolds Hole, which should be a Tea.
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Reply #12 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Do you know it?
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Reply #13 of 14 posted 3 JUL by Margaret Furness
I grow the rose sold as Mrs Reynolds Hole - it looks like the picture of RH Trouillard 1861, and grows like a Bourbon. It smells too good for a Tea. Photos below in my garden.
The article is on pages 30-33 of https://nla.gov.au/nla.obj-1342545091/view
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Reply #14 of 14 posted 14 days ago by Jose Luis Marginet Campos
Dear Margaret, thanks for the bibliography sent. The rose that you cultivate would be Mrs Reynolds Hole? The shape of the flower is a little different from that of the drawing: in one case it is herged and in the other it is not. On the other hand, in the drawing it would seem that the inner petals do not open.
Is it possible that Reynols Hole and Mrs Reynolds Hole are different roses?
The article says that "it is very similar to Catherine Guillot B", and it looks like her rose. Do you think your rose could be Catherine Guillot?
The shape of the plant is very similar, and the flowers are not vertical. I add photos of Catherine Guillot
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Reply #15 of 14 posted 14 days ago by Margaret Furness
The rose that I grow is sold as Mrs Reynolds Hole, but it is not correct: it is not a Tea.
I don't know enough about HPs and Bourbons to guess at what its true name is - as I said, there were so many! I think that Catherine Guillot is darker than my rose, in your photos.
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most recent 8 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 1 APR by mmanners
We had some students doing DNA work in the summer of 2018. Using RAPD (with 5 primers), they found that George Washington Richardson is identical to Mlle. de Sombreuil. So it should likely be listed as a synonym for that rose.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 1 APR by Margaret Furness
Interesting work. Question: what was the source of the Mlle de Sombreuil they used?
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 6 APR by mmanners
Margaret, It was the one grown by Vintage Gardens, originally found by Philip Robinson, and which appears identical to the one in the Lyon botanic garden.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 6 APR by Margaret Furness
Thank you. My memory says it was Phillip who identified our "Carlesruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn" as Mlle de Sombreuil. Pat and Patricia have noted that it grows more like a Bourbon, eg Souv de la Malmaison - but Malmaison is half Tea.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 6 APR by Patricia Routley
I only saw “Carlesruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn” in situ twice and noted that it had stout growth. I actually wouldn’t really recognise a Bourbon if I fell over one. But I am having great difficulty in matching the stout growth I saw on “Carlesruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn” with the fragile slender growth of "Mystery Cream Tea", also said to be ‘Mlle de Sombreuil’. Sorry, I haven’t really done my homework on this question, so forgive any foot in mouth ignorance.
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 6 APR by jedmar
The pictures of CCMB have a lot in common with Nestel's drawing of Mlle de Sombreuil. Have a look at the colour and form of the buds and sepals for example. In Nestel's drawing the buds are shown as nodding, but they were apparently upright (See Comment on Nestel drawing uploaded by Christina Macleod). The buds of the "Mystery Cream Tea" are shaped differently.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 6 APR by Margaret Furness
"Mystery Cream Tea" is so similar to Devoniensis, we had to grow them side by side at Renmark to show it was different. It's a vicious one.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 7 APR by Patricia Routley
Malcolm, I’ve merged “George Washington Richardson” with “"Huntington La Biche”. It has ended up where you wanted it. I am sorry for the delay.
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 7 APR by Ozoldroser
"Mystery Cream Tea" "Range View Pink Tea" is a completely different rose than "Carlsruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn" in habit, growth and features and the flowers of the former two study roses haven't much substance at all (finer and earlier?)
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 7 APR by jedmar
The provenance of 'Mlle de Sombreuil' at Tête d'Or is not certain - most of the OGR's there are recent plantings. I would only trust a DNA comparison of the various clones, not a visual identification.
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 8 APR by Margaret Furness
DNA testing, except for those with research facilities, is a cost I can't justify. For roses without continuity of name, we have to rely on skilled observers and/or appropriately detailed photos. For the time being I think we can assume that "Carlesruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn" is the same as "Huntington La Biche" and "George Washington Richardson" and the Tete d'Or rose labelled Mlle de Sombreuil, but whether the last is its correct name is uncertain.
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most recent 7 APR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 9 JAN 14 by Ozoldroser
"Carlsruhe Cemetery Maria Bruhn" is on plot 130 which is the grave of Maria Dorothea Sophia Bruhn (nee Pluckhahn) who died 25th June 1891. There are two identical roses on this double grave. The other half of the double grave is plot 143 which is the grave of her husband Johann Friedrich Christian Bruhn who died 8th December 1893.
Similar to 'Devoniensis' in colour but with flatter flower form. 46 petals, long spidery stamens, small pistils, pink stripe/blush on some petals. Borne in clusters of up to 8 with some being single blooms. - written 24th December 2000
While I thought initially it was a tea it has the feeling of a bourbon such as 'Souvenir de la Malmaison' with similar dieback to some stems. It is not a large bush in the cemetery but it has the classic vase shape naturally.
While it does not have a strong perfume its continuous blooming is a real bonus.
Leaves have a leaden greyish green sheen which stands out from most roses with glossy foliage.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 7 APR by Patricia Routley
Pat, have you ever considered ‘Mademoiselle Blanche Lafitte’ (Bourbon, Pradel, 1851)?
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