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Discussion id : 111-461
most recent 5 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 days ago by Dusan
Second rose for identification is: pink color, very nice fragrance, disease resistant, frost tolerant. Average diameter 3-4inch / 7-9cm Bloom one bud first then follows about 10 and after them a couple more, I think "Spray" is proper term for that... That branches failing down, because branches is to weak. And I think this is climber. On picture you will see some damage on petals like on first rose.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Margaret Furness
An excellent series of photos for identification purposes. (I'm not expert enough to suggest a name.) One question for other readers: does it flower just at this time of the year, or does it repeat?
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Dusan
It repeat flowering in flushes. First bloom appears in may and now I waiting new series. Thank you.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 5 days ago by billy teabag
Do you know the approximate age of the plant?
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Dusan
Must be 20+ years old. I cut she little harder. Also I think it is climber.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
I am sorry, I cannot help, but on your search for its correct name, keep in mind this rose's rounded leaves with very pointed tips - and the fact that it has prickles way up the stem.
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Discussion id : 111-308
most recent 11 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 days ago by Dusan
I have couple roses and I'm not sure what is name of that roses.
So i ask you to help me found proper names. One by one.

Pink (first two images have closest color), flower size is about 4 inch. Very nice fragrance. Disease resistant and very good against freezing. On picture petals is damaged, because we have these days rain and sun together (so petals after wash going to dry on strong sun and again in circle). And in behind you can see some red rose (spray) so don't use that for identification.

This rose must be introduced before 1995 or older.
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Discussion id : 111-160
most recent 2 JUN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 1 JUN by Kim97056
Can anyone help me Id this rose? It was my great-grandmothers, she was born in 1916. I think it’s 60-70+ years old, and my great grandpa bought it for her as an anniversary gift. It’s been transplanted probably 8-10 times, she moved it to each new house so it was quite important to her.
The rose is grafted.
It has 25 petals.
Beautiful strong fragrance. If the breeze is right, I can smell it on the patio
I’ve had success at getting a cutting to root so now I have two.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
Could be, 'Talisman'.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Margaret Furness
I wondered about that too, but the Talisman description says "Thornless or almost".
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
'Talisman' has thorns, (prickles). They are moderately well spaced as compared to many.

You will note, "Thornless or almost", is almost like default setting here at HMF.

I don't know why so many are listed this way but I've noted in most cases it is incorrect.
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Kim97056
My rose is very lightly thorned.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Margaret Furness
I no longer have Talisman, but the prickles on the photo I posted are similar to those on your rose - some almost straight, some slightly down-curved.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 1 JUN by Robert Neil Rippetoe
I'm fairly certain your rose is, 'Talisman'.

It was very popular, sold far and wide, about the time your GGrandmother would have acquired it.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 2 JUN by Give me caffeine
Umm, yes. It seems to usually mean "Thornless, or almost, when compared to horribly spiky monsters like Mermaid or Rose primula, and if you are feeling exceptionally charitable".
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Discussion id : 111-070
most recent 29 MAY HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 28 MAY by Maralynn
Please help me identify this rose that I fell in lust with this week. It's from a friend's garden, but she doesn't know what it is. The bush is 5 ft. tall, there are four or five blooms at the end of a long stem. The blossom is 6 1/2 inches across (be still my heart!) and it reminds me of the most blousy, romantic evening gown you have ever seen.
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 28 MAY by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
Please add a picture. There are thousands of roses that match your verbal description.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Maralynn
Thanks for the prompt!

Mara
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
Looks like Queen Elizabeth to me.
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Maralynn
I think that with blossoms of 6 1/2 inches in diameter, it's perhaps too big to be Queen Elizabeth?
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Reply #5 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
In cool weather QE can get very big. I used to grow it in a marine fog zone in San Juan Capistrano. And looking at the unbloomed sprays on the whole plant pic, those are very characteristic of the manner in which QE usually blooms, i.e., long, wide spaced sprays.
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Maralynn
Oh! That is so helpful to know. I was told that it has under 50 petals. Does that fit the description of QE?
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Kathy Strong's Del Cerro Garden
yes. official description of QE is 38 to 40 petals. Look up Queen Elizabeth on this website and scoot around the photos tab to see more,
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 29 MAY by Maralynn
Do the edges of the petals look different to you from my edges?
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