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'Lady Mann' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 74-918
most recent 30 APR 18 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 2 NOV 13 by Patricia Routley
Does anyone know how the 'Lady Mann' in commerce in Australia came to be found and identified as 'Lady Mann'?
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 29 APR 18 by Give me caffeine
I know this is late, and may mean nothing, but looking through the references I noticed that all the original ones (ie: 1940's) make no mention of scent, at all. It's only modern references than mention it.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 30 APR 18 by Patricia Routley
But it might mean something. 'Lady Mann's parent was 'Lorraine Lee' and Alister Clark himself said in 1924 that 'Lorraine Lee' had "moderate" scent. I seem to remember Margaret saying something like "if it is fragrant, it is not a tea". (Although if 'Lady Mann' was a seedling it might have inherited fragrance from its pollen parent). There is always the possibility that the 'Lady Mann' found in Alister Clark's old garden* was not the original rose and went out misnamed.

*Where, oh where did that gem of information come from? Oh dear, another search - I never get any work done here.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 30 APR 18 by Margaret Furness
Billy can smell all sorts of things in Teas; I don't have the Nose. I said "If it smells good, it ain't Tea", referring in particular to the rose sold as Francis Dubreuil.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 30 APR 18 by Patricia Routley
*I have an email from a friend dated October 9, 2011 which says:
'Lady Mann' came from Glenara but John [Nieuwesteeg} does not know for sure that it is correct.
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Discussion id : 74-326
most recent 6 OCT 14 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 30 SEP 13 by Patricia Routley
Could I request some more identifying photos of 'Lady Mann' this Australian spring season?
Buds, leaves, pedicel, canes and bush? Thanks.
Patricia
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 6 OCT 14 by Jane Z
my Lady Mann went to god a few years ago, however I'd note that her growth habit & structure was not like the bush form of LL, but much more akin to that of Lady Huntingfield. (Am not trying to suggest there is relationship between LM & LH, merely that they are structurally very similar).

Some early references to LM described a 'dwarf habit' with long stems, (wel, perhaps in contrast to very tall hybrid teas), but mine aachieved a height of approx 1.2+m, but a greater 'wingspan', as typically does Lady H.

Alister Clark suggested in 1940 that LM would make a good hedge rose, undoubtedly true.

Interesting that Grimwades had 2 sports of LL in their collection. Presumably Mrs Russell Grimwade, as a sport, had the same growth habit/structure as LL & BB, which is quite different to the Lady Mann that I purchased.
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Discussion id : 75-506
most recent 14 DEC 13 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 11 DEC 13 by Eric Timewell
Does anyone know how 'Lady Mann' compares with 'Mrs Russell Grimwade', said to be a sport of 'Lorraine Lee' but a darker colour? Has anyone met anyone who has ever seen 'Mrs RG'?
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 14 DEC 13 by Patricia Routley
The fuchsia pink of (the sport) ‘Mrs. Russell Grimwade’; and the rosy salmon of the original (bred) ‘Lady Mann’ is the only comparison that I can pick up on a brief look at the two files.

I have often wondered if there is any connection here with “Mrs. Val Nash” (syn “Rosehedge Cottage”).
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 14 DEC 13 by Eric Timewell
For the very little it is worth, 'Mrs Val Nash' seems to lack the Gigantea transparency of Lorraine Lee, Lady Mann, Squatter's Dream and (maybe) Baxter Beauty.
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Discussion id : 71-531
most recent 10 MAY 13 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 10 MAY 13 by Patricia Routley
While some roses in commerce in Australia as 'Lady Mann' have a smooth pedicel, the rose I saw at Kodja Place, Kojonup, WA last weekend, under this name had a definite glandular prickly pedicel.
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