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'Variegata di Bologna' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 42-587
most recent 19 JUN 10 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 19 FEB 10 by mashamcl
I would like to hear from somebody for whom this rose actually repeats. Both Vintage and Rogue list it as repeating occasionally.
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 20 FEB 10 by Jeff Britt
VdB did rebloom once for me -- two flowers in September on a plant that produced about 100 flowers in May.

Very occasional indeed.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 20 FEB 10 by mashamcl
Hi Jeff,
Two flowers is a lot better than none:-). How old is your plant? Also, are you saying it rebloomed one year and not again?

Masha
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Reply #3 of 10 posted 21 FEB 10 by Jeff Britt
I shovel pruned my VdB a few years ago. The spring flowering was fairly long and the flowers just lovely, but I have a small garden and every square cm of space counts, so I decided to replace it with a reblooming rose. It only rebloomed for me the one year and I had the plant for about 8 years, bought from Vintage.

I would not expect your VdB to rebloom much if at all. If you really want a remontant rose, this isn't the one. That said, the flowers are uniquely beautiful. I would be sure to give the bush plenty of room and peg the canes down to get the most flowers possible, then prune ruthlessly after blooming to encourage new growth that will flower next year. I tried to treat my plant as a reblooming climber and was obviously disappointed.
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Reply #4 of 10 posted 21 FEB 10 by mashamcl
Thank you, Jeff. I realize it is not a reblooming rose, but hope springs eternal:-). The vendors do indicate some rebloom... It does not have prime real estate in my garden. I do grow it fanned against a fence, but depending on how many basals I get I intend to take out completely some (or all ) the canes that have flowered each year. My plant is a one-year old band from Rogue Valley Roses.

Masha
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Reply #5 of 10 posted 21 FEB 10 by Margaret Furness
Honorine de Brabant doesn't have such striking contrast, but for me it's the best of the remontant stripes. Good rebloom.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted 21 FEB 10 by mashamcl
Thank you, Margaret. But for me it is about the striping:-).

Masha
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Reply #7 of 10 posted 18 JUN 10 by AquaEyes
I understand that limited space might dictate more than one bloom cycle in a rose, but before you get rid of another once-bloomer, why not try planting a companion clematis at the base of the rose? Any clematis from group 2 would be wonderful, being as they tend to start blooming after the roses are finishing off, and you'll get flowers again in the fall. Then you can enjoy the flowers on the rose, and later it doubles as a living trellis for its clematis buddy.
:-)
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Reply #8 of 10 posted 18 JUN 10 by Jeff Britt
I actually have many clematis growing through my roses, all type III pruning so I can whack them back when I'm pruning the roses in January. I have several viticella varieties, Gypsy Queen, Jackmani and three different C. florida all winding their way around. The clematis are looking particularly nice right now during the gap between the first and second flush on most of the roses.
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Reply #9 of 10 posted 18 JUN 10 by AquaEyes
Sounds beautiful! Have you ever tried any of the reblooming Type 2 clematis? I just planted 8 different albas as own-root bands for a community garden, each with a Type 2 buddy. I'm hoping that by the time the roses grow up the clematis will be in their "leap" stage and scramble up into them, providing some overlap of bloom with the clematis' first flush, and a later repeat at the end of summer. Since I won't be pruning the albas, I chose the Type 2 clematis because they won't actually require pruning, as they bloom on old and new wood. I figured this was the best type for the once-blooming roses.
:-)
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Reply #10 of 10 posted 19 JUN 10 by Jeff Britt
I'm not as fond of the Type II clematis. I think they do require some winter pruning -- thinning and training, or they just become a tangle of old dead leaves and stems. Perhaps I'm too fussy, but I just don't like seeing the old dead leaves from prior years next to the flowers. And in California at least, many of the Type III will bloom again spectacularly in the fall if the plant is cut back in Mid-July after the spring flush is over. This isn't easy if the clematis is all entangled in the rose leaves, but it's worth it.
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Discussion id : 40-938
most recent 4 DEC 09 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 DEC 09 by Jeff Britt
My VdB, which came from Vintage, only produced on marvelous and long-lasting spring bloom. The plant was very vigorous and made many new, long canes each year which I pegged down to get the best display possible. The flowers were lovely. Alas, without ANY rebloom (no "occasional rebloom in my garden) and the plants space hogging nature, I regretfully dug it up and gave it to a friend who wanted it. I visit it once a year in spring, and in her garden planted next to a climbing Souvenir de la Malmaison, it looks very much at home. VdB doesn't rebloom at all for her either.
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