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'Crown Princess Margareta ®' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 100-911
most recent 2 MAR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 16 JUN 17 by Badger Rose
This rose came back very strongly from winter after its first season. I only got one or two roses from it last year but this spring it has offered me dozens of pale, pretty blooms. The color is a bit subtle for me by itself, but when neighbor Dark Desire (whose color by itself is also kind of bland but in the opposite way) started blooming I really loved the combination. (WI, zone 5a)
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Reply #1 of 18 posted 16 JUN 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Mine was the same own-root, really stingy the 1st year. Then an English rosarian told me to give it more potassium .. second year it's an explosion of blooms for spring flush. Now for spring flush I use NPK 10-20-40, plus blood meal & gypsum, since zone 5a prunes roses short.
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Reply #2 of 18 posted 17 JUN 17 by Badger Rose
Great! Thanks for the info! As a novice I appreciate the advice.
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Reply #3 of 18 posted 26 FEB by peterdewolf
how did you get hold of 'potassium'
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Reply #4 of 18 posted 26 FEB by Give me caffeine
It's commonly available as compounds in many fertilisers, or in wood ash, or in compost. Obviously she wasn't referring to the pure metallic form.
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Reply #6 of 18 posted 26 FEB by ....
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Reply #7 of 18 posted 26 FEB by Give me caffeine
Sure, potassium sulphate is a pretty common one. Can add to acidity though, due to the sulphate ions, so not the best if your soil already has a lowish pH. Better to just buy a fertiliser that has a high potassium content. And if you have a wood fire in winter, the ash is a really good source of potassium and will not acidify your soil (quite the opposite).

And the name 'potash' literally refers to ash in a pot, which was how they used to extract potassium in the old days. :)
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Reply #8 of 18 posted 26 FEB by ....
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Reply #9 of 18 posted 26 FEB by Give me caffeine
Actually I thought he might have been getting snippy. Apologies to Peter if he wasn't.

And potassium is a metal. It's highly reactive though, so rarely seen outside laboratories. The potassium compounds that you usually encounter are technically potassium salts. Potassium sulphate is much the same as iron sulphate: metal atoms combined with sulphate ions. :)
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Reply #10 of 18 posted 27 FEB by ....
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Reply #5 of 18 posted 26 FEB by ....
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Reply #11 of 18 posted 27 FEB by peterdewolf
Good man, thanks. I used to buy all sorts of stuff, including cyanide so I was curious that someone might actually be getting pottassium 'salts', I understood the reference too literaly.
Gathered a big bag of seaweed a few days ago, laid it out on a big tarp and went at it with the hedge shears, made a cracking job of reducing it all. So did the same wityh my leaf mulch, lovely black gold it is. My GJs have put on 6 inches of shoots in the last few days, they're roaring to go !
I'm an amateur gardener but I am very interested in the science behind it all too .
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Reply #12 of 18 posted 27 FEB by ....
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Reply #13 of 18 posted 28 FEB by peterdewolf
" The canes can get very thick and stiff, so if you are training it as a climber I'd start early while the canes are still flexible and you can bend them into shape."

that's good advice, definitely will attempt to train the beasties and start early as you say. I've inherited a 'climber' in this property straddling one side of a gazebo, canes as thick as my thumb and rigid, nothing grows on it except a half dozen blooms on the very top which at the moment is about 9 feet :-) . This year I'm gonna look out for potential new canes and try pegging them, see what it does, if it doesn't respond I'll toss it and plant an eden.
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Reply #14 of 18 posted 28 FEB by ....
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Reply #15 of 18 posted 28 FEB by peterdewolf
" what is the old climber "
A Deer With No Eyes
No idea :-)
It's a generic pink hybrid tea form with a moderate fragrance. Two years ago I began pruning it and shaping it and feeding it. Last year it put out a dozen new canes that raced from the base to 7 and 8 feet by mid summer and I was excited but it didn't respond to 45º 'pegging' and I got no lateral breaks at all, just blooms at the tip. It did bloom until the end of december which flabbered my ghast so I'm going to do my best to try more radical shaping, as close to 180º as I can and see what it does.
Haven't heard of red pierre, I'l look that up. has to have fragrance though, can't abide a rose that hasn't got fragrance.
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Reply #16 of 18 posted 28 FEB by ....
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Reply #17 of 18 posted 1 MAR by peterdewolf
AHH, yes I'd browsed Red Eden and there is a miniature Eden as well, but I did read that neither of them are 'related' to that non-stop bloomer Pierre de Ronsard. I'd also fancied Jasminia, looks very floriferous and pretty but it did get a bad rap for going soggy in the wet and as you say, I'm in sunny Ireland. Or as my granny used to say.
" if you can't see the hills then it's raining and if you can see the hills then it's going to rain"
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Reply #18 of 18 posted 2 MAR by ....
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Discussion id : 113-357
most recent 2 OCT 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 OCT 18 by Nola Z5a WI
Informational Heirloom Roses lists Crown Princess Margareta as 5 (-20° to -10°).
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Discussion id : 112-113
most recent 11 JUL 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 JUL 18 by jeffbee
the fragrance is very good (strong). To me it smells like sweet strawberry wine(does it exist? haha) tasty~
the form is not very well-formed(comparing to the delicate Golden celebration/Jubilee celebration blossoms), the color is light apricot-white. which personally I do not like as it looks old(antique? obsolete?)
the branches is more upright than some other austins, but still nods a little bit.
Mine died from spider mites and black spots 3 years ago....
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Discussion id : 104-298
most recent 12 AUG 17 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 11 AUG 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
For comparison of this rose vs. other orange roses as own-roots regarding scents & water-requirement, see link:
https://www.helpmefind.com/gardening/l.php?l=3.23414&tab=32
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 11 AUG 17 by Patricia Routley
HelpMeFind works best when comments on one rose, appear in that rose's file.
When you are mentioning more than one rose, perhaps it might be better placed in your Garden's Comments. That way it will still appear for public knowledge, but people who are searching for information specifically on other roses, will not have to plough too much to find what they need.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 12 AUG 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Thanks for that tip. I moved the info. to my garden's comments.
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