HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
DescriptionPhotosLineageAwardsReferencesMember RatingsMember CommentsMember JournalsCuttingsGardensBuy From 
'Lorraine Lee' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 116-543
most recent 3 MAY HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 3 MAY by Heather B
I made a comment about the photo of “Lorraine Lee”(bush form). For whatever reason, the photo shown was not right, but when I went back to it, it was fine!
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 3 MAY by kgs
Photos rotate so you won't see the same ones every time you look up a plant.
REPLY
Discussion id : 116-542
most recent 3 MAY HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 3 MAY by Heather B
“Lorraine Lee” (the bush form). The photo for this rose is not Lorraine Lee. I don’t think it is even a photo of a rose.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 1 posted 3 MAY by Margaret Furness
I'm guessing you're referring to the photo of a rose which has had its petals and stamens removed for pollination.
REPLY
Discussion id : 96-110
most recent 30 NOV 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 30 NOV 16 by Andrew from Dolton
From R.H.S. Encyclopedia of Roses by Charles and Brigid Quest-Ritson. Published for Dorling Kindersley a Penguin Company. 2003 edition.

...It blooms throughout the year, but needs a warm place to flourish, even in Melbourne. Alister Clark considered 'Lorraine Lee' better than any of his later hybrids "for its colour and habit it is, in my opinion, unsurpassed by anything I have done". The Melbourne newspaper, The Argus, used to run an annual popularity popularity poll among its readers: 'Lorraine Lee' constantly topped the list of bush roses . Lorraine Lee was a relation of Alister Clark's sister-in-law Mary (Minnie) Clark. Lorraine was born in Melbourne in 1890, moved to England as a child, lived at Frinton-on-Sea in Essex (where her rose did not survive the English winters), and died unmarried in 1974.
REPLY
Discussion id : 46-046
most recent 22 JUN 10 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 20 JUN 10 by Simon Voorwinde
Comments on the main page say that 'Lorraine Lee' is susceptible to blackspot. I have not seen any evidence of this in Tasmania, Australia, so far where it shows a greater propensity to mildew than spotting. Here it is almost evergreen.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 4 posted 21 JUN 10 by HMF Admin
Simon,

Ideal feedback as knowing a plant performs differently for different site guests is particularly useful.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 4 posted 21 JUN 10 by Margaret Furness
The Tea Rose book documents mildew but makes no mention of black spot among Lorraine Lee's faults.
REPLY
Reply #3 of 4 posted 21 JUN 10 by Unregistered Guest
Not much spotting here.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 4 posted 22 JUN 10 by Patricia Routley
Agree. Black spot is not an issue. The reference to it is removed.
REPLY
© 2019 HelpMeFind.com