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'Monsieur Tillier' rose Reviews & Comments
Discussion id : 93-575
most recent 7 MAR SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 19 JUN 16 by Give me caffeine
I was asking Billy about the ultimate size of some Teas, so I could allow enough space for them in a new bed. She said her Tillier is now around 5 metres high and wide, after a decade or so. In case anyone was wondering how big this rose likes to get if given a chance.
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Reply #1 of 16 posted 19 JUN 16 by Patricia Routley
Huge! Here after 19 years, it is probably 4m x 4m and competing with Sequoia roots.
The sizes are Height: 120cm - 205cm. Let's increase that to 200 x 500cm.
Width is now 90cm-305cm and I think 200-500 is more realistic.
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Reply #2 of 16 posted 24 NOV 16 by billy teabag
Fondly known by more than one as "The Big Tea" and "Monster Tillier".
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Reply #3 of 16 posted 29 MAR 17 by Give me caffeine
A healthy beast indeed. I would be satisfied with something like that.

Mine seems to be settling in nicely but it's still quite small.
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Reply #4 of 16 posted 25 JUL 17 by Give me caffeine
Ah yes, well. That thing about it still being "quite small". Umm, it's now as tall as I am. This is after a few months of autumn and winter. God knows what's going to happen when spring hits.

Not that it matters. I gave it enough space to do Mermaid imitations if it wants to.
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Reply #5 of 16 posted 6 MAR by delaney
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Reply #6 of 16 posted 6 MAR by Give me caffeine
I haven't taken a tape to mine lately but it's well over 2 metres tall now. I have some cuttings in at the moment, so will be throwing a few more around the block, and possibly giving some to friends. I should do some General Gallieni cuttings too, now that I think of it. It's an odd rose, but rather fun, and has a good scent.
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Reply #7 of 16 posted 6 MAR by delaney
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Reply #8 of 16 posted 6 MAR by Give me caffeine
It seems to strike easily. Get one, make a dozen. :)
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Reply #9 of 16 posted 6 MAR by delaney
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Reply #10 of 16 posted 6 MAR by Give me caffeine
A whole pack of dogs dare. Woof!

PS: Get 'Mermaid'. Makes its own sea all by itself, and eats anything that gets near it.
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Reply #11 of 16 posted 7 MAR by delaney
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Reply #12 of 16 posted 7 MAR by delaney
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Reply #13 of 16 posted 7 MAR by Margaret Furness
Have a look at www.heritageroses.org.au/articles/rose-propagation-ziplock-bag-technique/
It needs about 6 weeks of warm weather - might be too late to start where you are.
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Reply #14 of 16 posted 7 MAR by Give me caffeine
Mine started producing roots in about two weeks, but they were only 6-8 mm long at that stage.
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Reply #15 of 16 posted 7 MAR by Margaret Furness
yes, if you pot them out before they have a good root system, you'll lose them. Note: for either the doggybag or the broccoli box (autumn / winter) technique, you really should write a comprehensible form of the name on each stem, with an Artline Garden Marker. My first attempt with broccoli boxes has led to me playing guessing games as the buds show colour.
Is MAC Mme Alfred Carriere or Mme Abel Chatenay?
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Reply #16 of 16 posted 7 MAR by Give me caffeine
Doesn't matter much with the bags, as long as you're not mixing cultivars in one bag. I've just been writing the name on the bag. Each pot will get labelled once they are potted.

I had thought about boxes. If doing a range of cultivars in one box, you could drop a plastic sheet divider between cultivars (presumably they'll be in rows) and just stick a label into the propagating mix in each division. Should be easier and clearer than writing on stems.

TBH I'm thinking the bags aren't the best method anyway. I'm inclined to try the next lot in 90mm forestry tubes in a 12 cell rack, with a clear plastic propagating dome over the top. Less of a swamp, should be able to keep the humidity right, and much easier to work with than the bags.
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Discussion id : 112-369
most recent 23 JUL 18 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 23 JUL 18 by HubertG
From Dingee & Conard's 'New Guide to Rose Culture' 1894 page 13:

"New Roses Introduced in 1893 and 1894.

Monsieur Tillier (Introduced 1893). - The color is exquisite carmine, passing to coppery red; very pretty and distinct; flowers good size, quite double and highly tea scented. 25 cts each."
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 23 JUL 18 by Patricia Routley
Thanks again Hubert. Good to see both 'Monsieur Tillier' and 'Archiduc Joseph' descriptions both described in an early catalogue.
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Discussion id : 94-622
most recent 29 AUG 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 29 AUG 16 by Margaret Furness
Evergreen in zone 9b.
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Discussion id : 94-465
most recent 19 AUG 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 19 AUG 16 by Steven Cook
This is listed at Rogue Valley Roses as "Monsieur William Tillier."
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 19 AUG 16 by jedmar
Definitely no "William" in the name - if at all, it would have been "Guillaume". This can only qualify as a hidden name and should not be propagated as a synonym!
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