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Noisettes Roses, 19th century Charleston's gift to the world.
(2009)  Page(s) 55.  
 
[Summary]
Text by Odile Masquelier.
'Blush Noistette' never arrived in France. The rose that did reach France goes by several names : 'Noisette carnée', 'Rose de Philippe Noisette', or the 'Flesh-colored Noisette Rose'.
(2009)  Includes photo(s).
 
p22 ….And while we may long to know the original name of one of the found Noisettes that have been discovered in old Southern gardens and cemeteries, like “Cato’s Cluster,” finding proof for any name would be daunting.

p24 Photo. “Cato’s Cluster” (photo by Gregg Lowery).

p39 “Cato’s Cluster” Found in Virginia, USA, by Carl Cato. Old rose collector Carl Cato of Virginia discovered this beauty in a Virginia garden. For some years he suspected it to be the original ‘Champneys’ Pink Cluster’. The genetic research performed at Florida Southern College on behalf of the Noisette Study Garden in Charleston, South Carolina, has shown that this rose differs from a number of roses that have been thought to be John Champneys’ rose. “Cato’s Cluster” makes trusses of 2-inch blooms, rose pink to blush pink, semidouble and very fragrant. Very much in the style of ‘Blush Noisette’, the plant is upright and arching; it reaches about 5 feet in the open.

p52 ….The [DNA of] “Cato’s Cluster” rose, as expected, appears to be closely related but not genetically identical to those roses grown as ‘Champneys’ Pink Cluster’.
(2009)  Includes photo(s).
 
p41 Photo "Mrs. Woods' Lavender-Pink Noisette"

p42 Gregg Lowery: "Mrs. Woods' Lavender-Pink Noisette". Found in California, USA, by Doris Woods, circa 1985. An elegant, richly colored Noisette with globular blooms of deep lavender-pink, this rose has flowers that are nearly 2 inches across. The plant grows vigorously up and arching to 8 feet or more. It is quite resistant to mildew, even in shade, as evidenced by the success of the mother plant, which was found in the foggy north coastal town of Fort Bragg, California. It grew in the garden of Doris Woods' mother, who passed it on in the 1980s to nurserywoman Joyce Demits of Heritage Rose Gardens. This rose, which is identical to the foundlings "Mt. Vernon Purple" and "Chester Cemetery", may be the old nineteenth-century French cultivar 'La Marseillaise'.

p43 Note: Four roses that were included in the DNA portion of the Hampton Park Noisette Study are now missing from the Noisette Study Garden: "Chester Cemetery", "Mt. Vernon" and.... "Chester Cemetery" was too small to include in the morphological part of the Hampton Park Noisette Study.
(2009)  Includes photo(s).
 
p27 "Fewell's Noisette" [Photo by Gregg Lowery].

p39. Gregg Lowery. "Fewell's Noisette". Found in South Carolina, USA by Ruth Knopf. Discovered by Ruth Knopf in a cemetery in Rock Hill, South Carolina, "Fewell's Noisette" is a very dense grower with upright canes and dense panicles of bloom. The clean white 1-inch flowers are barely touched with pink, neat and small, rounded in outline with a tidy form, softened by a few central petaloids that curl inward. The petals are long and pointed, making a charming packet of ribbons tied in a bow. The plant is compact and stays to about 4 feet in full sun.
(2009)  Page(s) 29.  
 
Ruth Knopf. Rediscovering the Old Noisettes.
Over a period of time, I found many of the old Noisettes. One was "Fewell's Noisette", which I came across in an old cemetery in upstate South Carolina. It was growing on the grave of a Mr. Fewell, a soldier with a Confederate marker on his grave. The rose looked much like 'Champneys' Pink Cluster', yet it is not quite the same. Today "Fewell's Noisette" is in commerce for all to grow and enjoy, but sadly is no longer to be found in the cemetery.
(2009)  Page(s) 13.  
 
C. Patton Hash. Champneys and South Carolina's Forgotten Rose.
Another possible source for Champneys' parent plants was John Fraser, one of the most colorful botanist-explorers of the day. Born in Scotland and trained at Kew, Fraser arrived in South Carolina in 1786 and by 1787 had published Flora Caroliniana the first extensive study of the state's flora and a landmark in American botanical writing. Fraser started a nursery on the Stono River near where Maybank Highway crosses onto John's Island. Only a few miles separated it from Champneys' plantation on the Wallace River, a tributary of the Stone.....
(2009)  Includes photo(s).
 
p13. C. Patton Hash. Champneys and South Carolina's Forgotten Rose.
Another possible source for Champneys' parent plants was John Fraser, one of the most colorful botanist-explorers of the day. Born in Scotland and trained at Kew, Fraser arrived in South Carolina in 1786 and by 1787 had published Flora Caroliniana the first extensive study of the state's flora and a landmark in American botanical writing. Fraser started a nursery on the Stono River near where Maybank Highway crosses onto John's Island. Only a few miles separated it from Champneys' plantation on the Wallace River, a tributary of the Stone.....

p40. Photo. Gregg Lowery: "Frazer's Pink Musk". Found in South Carolina, USA, and displayed at The Huntington Botanical Gardens, circa 1980. While this may yet prove to be identical with the Noisette called "Lingo Musk", the genetic study seems to indicate that the two are not identical. In the 1980s this rose grew in The Huntington Botanical gardens, and was believed to be the rose raised by the Charleston botanist and nurseryman John Frazer, a contemporary of Philippe Noisette and John Champneys. This tall, broad plant can send up canes of 7 to 8 feet in late summer and autumn, each of which finishes in a great panicle of flowers. The blooms are small, an inch or so across, rosy pink to blush, with a sweet, musky scent.

p41 ibid. Rosarian Leonie Bell ordered it ["Lingo Musk"], grew it, and suspected it to be the long lost "Frazer's Pink Musk". It is uncertain whether this plant is distinct from the "Frazer's Pink Musk" that was grown at The Huntington Botanical gardens; however, the genetic study portion of the Hampton Park Noisette Study seems to indicate that they are different.
(2009)  Page(s) 40.  Includes photo(s).
 
Gregg Lowery: "Haynesville Pink Cluster". Found in Louisiana, USA by Tommy Adams in 1988. Small flowered with loosely double blooms in airy clusters, "Haynesville Pink Cluster" makes a great arching mound and is more truly climbing in nature than most of the Champneys' types. The open blooms are an inch or less across, and the plant can achieve 10 feet or more in height and breadth. In Sebastopol, California, it is always in bloom. In a cool summer climate, it is very susceptible to 'powdery mildew. Perhaps one of the Noisettes that is most tolerant of shade, it will bloom as abundantly in shade as in full sun. Tommy Adams discovered this rose in Haynesville, Louisiana, while working for The Antique Rose Emporium, which reintroduced it in the late 1980s.
(2009)  Page(s) 41.  Includes photo(s).
 
Gregg Lowery: "La Nymphe". Found in California, USA, by Fred Boutin, circa 1985. The name given this foundling refers to a Tea-Noisette rose descended from 'Marechal Niel', and the attribution is incorrect. Nonetheless, despite the soft blush coloring of the blooms and the blowsy quality of the flowers and their large open clusters, it is probably the offspring of a Tea rose crossed with an Old Noisette. The 3-inch semidouble flowers are large-petaled, somewhat pointed in the bud, and open cupped. It is a climbing rose that will reach 10 feet tall and wide. The rich, fresh fragrance owes its fruity sweetness to a Tea rose ancestor. Discovered in the Gilliam Cemetery in Sebastopol, California, by Fred Boutin, "La Nymphe" has been seen surviving in many California waysides.
(2009)  Page(s) 41.  
 
Gregg Lowery: "Lingo Musk". Found in Florida, USA, by Mr Lingo, distributed in 1970 by Joseph Kern Nursery. With huge clusters of blush pink flowers touched rosy on the petal edges, "Lingo Musk" creates a continuous and generous display of bloom. The plant, which is upright and arching, provided a touchstone for the observational phase of the Hampton Park Noisette Study. Very much the archetype of the Champneys' type, it displays many of the common traits of the Noisettes in this group. One-inch blooms are semidouble, blowsy, and fragrant. The stature of the bush is modest and upright to about 4 or 5 feet. Mr. Lingo of Florida passed his discovery on to the Joseph Kern Nursery in Ohio. Rosarian Leonie Bell ordered it, grew It, and suspected it to be the long lost "Frazer's Pink Musk" ['Fraser's Pink Musk'?]. It is uncertain whether this plant is distinct from the"'Frazer's Pink Musk" that was grown at The Huntington Botanical Gardens; however, the genetic study portion of the Hampton Park Noisette Study seems to indicate that they are different.
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