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Roses, Clematis and Peonies
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The Flower-Garden, or Breck's Book of Flowers
(1858)  Page(s) 290.  
 
Baltimore Belle.- The flowers are a pale, waxy blush, almost white, very double, in large clusters; like the other, perfectly hardy.
(1858)  Page(s) 285.  
 
Musk Roses.-- The Musk Rose stands pretty well here, in a warm, dry situation, but, in wet ground, rather tender. In the latitude of Long Island, Mr. Parsons says it is quite hardy, having a plant of the old White Musk, that has braved the severity of more than twenty winters, in his grounds. "It has already, this season, made shoots of more than six feet; and in our Southern States more than double the growth would probably be attained." It produces its flowers in large clusters. We are familiar with the old white cluster, which commences flowering late, and continues till cold weather. Other fine varieties are, Eponine, and Princess of Nassau.
(1858)  Page(s) 71.  
 
Pæonia.
Pæony Moutan, or the Tree Peony, and its varieties, are magnificent plants, with flowers of various shades of red, lilac, light purple and white, measuring from four to eight inches in diameter, all of easy culture; very hardy, requiring but little protection.
P. moutan papaveracea rosea is a variety with fine rose-colored flowers, and one of the same color with double flowers; not very common.
(1858)  Page(s) 71.  
 
Pæonia.
Pæony Moutan, or the Tree Peony, and its varieties, are magnificent plants, with flowers of various shades of red, lilac, light purple and white, measuring from four to eight inches in diameter, all of easy culture; very hardy, requiring but little protection.
P. moutan papaveracea rosea is a variety with fine rose-colored flowers, and one of the same color with double flowers; not very common.
(1858)  Page(s) 290.  
 
Prairie Roses...Perpetual Pink produces flowers in great profusion, which continue in long succession; rather small, but in large clusters, varying from light-pink to purple.
(1858)  Page(s) 285.  
 
Musk Roses.-- The Musk Rose stands pretty well here, in a warm, dry situation, but, in wet ground, rather tender. In the latitude of Long Island, Mr. Parsons says it is quite hardy, having a plant of the old White Musk, that has braved the severity of more than twenty winters, in his grounds. "It has already, this season, made shoots of more than six feet; and in our Southern States more than double the growth would probably be attained." It produces its flowers in large clusters. We are familiar with the old white cluster, which commences flowering late, and continues till cold weather. Other fine varieties are, Eponine, and Princess of Nassau.
(1858)  Page(s) 289-290.  
 
Samuel Feast, Esq., of Baltimore, has the honor of originating the first Prairie Rose,- the Queen of the Prairies,- for which the Massachusetts Horticultural Society awarded him their large gold medal, as a special premium. This is the type of a new class of hardy Roses, and proves to be a most valuable acquisition for the North, it being as hardy as oak. The tribe bloom after the summer Roses are passed.
Queen of the Prairies is a most suberb variety of Rosa rubifolia, a native of the West, sometimes known as the Michigan Rose. This is Mr. Feast's first seedling, and considered by some the best. The flowers are of a deep rose color, with a white stripe in the centre of each petal. They have a peculiar globular, cap-shaped form. This variety is the most luxurious grower of any of the class, making a surprising growth in rich soil. The flowers of all the varieties are produced in clusters.
(1858)  Page(s) 291.  
 
Rivers's George the Fourth is a Hybrid China; grows about ten feet high;.flowers large, of a very rich crimson color. This is also a fine dwarf Rose, when pruned down, and, like most of the Hybrid China, stands perfectly well in the open ground, but the tops are always winterkilled here.
(1858)  Page(s) 290.  
 
Rosa superba has pale, delicate blush roses, in large clusters, the flowers not so large as the Baltimore Belle.
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