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Rose Letter
(Nov 2018)  Page(s) 11. Vol 42, No. 4.  Includes photo(s).
 
Darrell G. H. Schramm.  The Widows Three, The Roses 12.
The Widow Ducher’s fourth surviving rose is ‘Beauté Inconstante’. Incorrectly, the author of this Tea rose is usually given as Joseph Pernet- Ducher, the widow’s son-in-law. However, the July 1871 issue of Journal des Roses informs us that she bred the rose in 1884. Fabien Ducher, a descendent who now operates the nursery, has affirmed this fact.....
(Feb 2013)  Page(s) 6.  
 
Daniel Boll of New York, a Swiss horticulturist, established his Midtown Nursery in 1837, the same year in which he introduced his hybrid perpetual ‘Belle Americaine’. The rose may have been named in reference to Elizabeth Monroe, wife of our fifth president; it was the name given her by the French when she intervened to prevent the Marquise de Layfayette [sic] from being guillotined. It is not clear whether or not ‘Belle Americaine’ is the same rose as ‘Pretty American’, to which the French name translates; the latter is also ascribed to Boll but is described as a deep pink miniature.
(Aug 2001)  Page(s) 4. Vol 26, No. 3.  
 
Rev. Douglas T. Seidel, Pennsylvania. Those fabulous Foundlings: the No-Name Noisettes.
"Cato's Cluster" (Vintage Gardens) is synonymous with what many of us were calling "Florida Pink Noisette". The name memorializes Carl Cato, one of the founders of the Heritage Rose Group and of this publication. I first saw this variety at a flower show in Miami in April of 1980, where it was being shown as 'Champney's Pink Cluster'. Show officials put me in touch with the exhibitor, Mrs. Thomas Johnston of Coral Gables. This gracious lady invited me to visit her roses the next day. Amid the palms, plumerias, and citrus of her garden, there were orchids beginning to naturalize, drifts of blue bulbous iris, Easter lilies beyond counting, and a collection of Chinas, Teas, and Noisettes that had taken a lifetime to assemble. This wonderful pink foundling was guarding the entrance to Mrs. Johnston's enchanted world. When Leonie Bell saw my rooted cuttings in bloom later that year, she had to have one and, " ... one for Carl, too, please." I assume Carl not only liked the rose but that he shared it with his friends, as well. "Cato's Cluster" is as hardy as a Hybrid Tea and an excellent rebloomer. The flowers are fully double, a row or two of pale petals encircling.a non-fading rich pink center.
(1987)  Page(s) vol. 12, no. 1.  
 
By Virginia Hopper, Heritage Rose Gardens, Branscomb, California
For several years there has been a cloud of doubt hanging over the rose we know as ‘Sombreuil’, classed as a climbing Tea, 1850.
Another rose, called ‘Colonial White’ was introduced in 1959 by Melvin Wyant Nursery of Ohio.
It was not too long after that when it was noticed that this rose resembled ‘Sombreuil’ … and then later it was rumored that the rose we knew as ‘Sombreuil’ was perhaps ‘Colonial White’ and not ‘Sombreuil’ after all … and so the table was turned and confusion began to reign.
In trying to pin down and straighten out this confusion I have been corresponding with Mr. L. Arthur Wyatt of Middlesex, England. What follows is a direct quote from Mr. Wyatt’s letter.
‘Sombreuil’ v. ‘Colonial White’
“Here is my evidence in the above case which I hope will help in resolving the problem of their identities for you.
Bud-wood of ‘Colonial White’ came to me from my long-time correspondent, Mrs. David Blake, then of Detroit, in the summer of 1963. I understood that she had obtained her plant from the Melvin Wyant Nursery in Ohio two seasons previously.
When I decided in 1967 to begin supplying roses not otherwise available through commercial sources, I included it in my first catalogue as it was not available in this country, deliveries to begin in Autumn 1968.
Meanwhile, following publication of a colour plate of it in the Spring issue 1968 of The Rose magazine of which I was then Editor, I received several letters from readers pointing out the striking similarity to ‘Sombreuil.’ Mr. Reg Parker of Balham, London, had purchased the later in the late 1950’s from the then famous Sunningdale Nurseries where the Revival Movement of the Old Roses all began and kindly sent me bud-wood so that I could compare the two.
Mr. Ron Cogbill, the propagator and a professional budder of many years experience, reported slight differences in the “feel” of the bud-wood, but this could have been caused by the difference in origin. When the two groups grew on in the nursery rows, there were no detectable differences in any of the characteristics. I and others who saw the two batches concluded that to all intents and purposes they were one and the same cultivar.
As to the stated parentage of ‘Colonial White’ given in Modern Roses, ‘New Dawn’ x ‘Mme. Hardy’, Mr. Gordon Rowley who was then Head of the Department of Agricultural Botany in the University of Reading and one of our leading authorities on the genus Rosa said that Mr. Wyant appeared to have achieved the impossible, as in his experience, ‘Mme. Hardy’ had never produced seed nor viable pollen,....."
(Feb 2013)  Page(s) 6.  
 
According to Gardener’s Monthly of 1880, several of Boll’s roses were sold by various unscrupulous persons in France “who sent them out as their own.” The lovely old Portland rose ‘Comte de Chambord’, bred originally as ‘Mme Boll’, is apparently one of these roses.
(Aug 2001)  Page(s) 3. Vol 26, No. 3.  
 
Rev. Douglas T. Seidel, Pennsylvania. Those fabulous Foundlings: the No-Name Noisettes.
....The blooms on three varieties, "Lingo", "Fewell's Noisette", and "Haynesville Pink Cluster" are practically identical: semi-double ivory or palest blush with two or three rows of petals, like faint editions of 'Champneys' Pink Cluster'. "Lingo"was found by a collector of that name in the late 1960s in north Florida and shared with the late Joseph F. Kern Nursery in Mentor, Ohio. The four foot plant was such a willing bloomer that Mr. Kern put it on the market for the next few years as the Charleston-raised 'Frazer's Pink Musk'. "Fewell's Noisette and the "Haynesville" rose carry the same type of flower on climbing plants that will reach ten feet in my locale. "Fewell's" may have an edge over the others with huge clusters of buds and nice foliations on the sepals.
(Feb 2019)  Page(s) 17. Vol 43, No. 1.  Includes photo(s).
 
Darrell G.H.Schramm.  Greetings to Rose Lovers. 
‘Gruss an Aachen’ is considered the first Floribunda, though when it appeared in 1909.....
(Feb 2019)  Page(s) 19, Vol 43, No. 1.  Includes photo(s).
 
Darrell G.H.Schramm.  Greetings to Rose Lovers. 
‘Gruss an Coburg’, a Hybrid Tea, puts forth coppery buds and huge, full flowers.....
(Feb 2019)  Page(s) 20, Vol 43, No. 1.  Includes photo(s).
 
Darrell G.H.Schramm.  Greetings to Rose Lovers. 
Gruss an Teplitz’ recalls a small city in the Czech Republic......
(Aug 2001)  Page(s) 3. Vol 26, No. 3.  
 
Rev. Douglas T. Seidel, Pennsylvania. Those fabulous Foundlings: the No-Name Noisettes.
....The blooms on three varieties, "Lingo", "Fewell's Noisette", and "Haynesville Pink Cluster" are practically identical: semi-double ivory or palest blush with two or three rows of petals, like faint editions of 'Champneys' Pink Cluster'. "Lingo"was found by a collector of that name in the late 1960s in north Florida and shared with the late Joseph F. Kern Nursery in Mentor, Ohio. The four foot plant was such a willing bloomer that Mr. Kern put it on the market for the next few years as the Charleston-raised 'Frazer's Pink Musk'. "Fewell's Noisette" and the "Haynesville" rose carry the same type of flower on climbing plants that will reach ten feet in my locale. "Fewell's" may have an edge over the others with huge clusters of buds and nice foliations on the sepals.
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