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Heritage Roses in Australia Conference Proceedings
(1997)  Page(s) 82.  
 
Hillary Merrifield.  Workshop.  What is that Rose’: 
A comparison between  ‘Céline Forestier’ and ‘Desprez à Fleurs Jaunes’....
(1997)  Page(s) 82.  
 
Hillary Merrifield.  Workshop.  What is that Rose’: 
A comparison between  ‘Céline Forestier’ and ‘Desprez à Fleurs Jaunes’....
(1986)  Page(s) 27.  
 
Dr. Judyth McLeod, Noisettes, the French Darlings.
Desprez a Fleur Jaune is equally superb.  It needed the kind of climate, I think, though, of the Mediterranian, Australia, New Zealand and the Southern United States to bring out the best in this Noisette.  It is utterly superb, very double, very flat, particularly fine in water, in silky cream yellow, shaded down with buff, peach and apricot, with an intense delicious fragrance.  In my open garden its beauty is, to my mind, indescribable. 
(1993)  
 
Hahndorf Conference. Walter Duncan. Teas and Noisettes.
p58. Mrs. Herbert Stevens (1910) is a lovely white Tea; a huge bush about two metres high. With its nodding heads, it is a graceful plant in every sense of the word. There is not much light green foliage at the base of the plant, so it is probably best kept at the back of the bed. There is also a true climbing form of this rose. As Maureen explained yesterday, it is a true climber rather than a mutated climber. it does not repeat-bloom.

'Niphetos'. There are two forms of this rose, a bush form which appeared in 1843 and the climbing form which was first propagated in 1889. It has charming creamy buds opening to pure white with pointed petals, which highlight a muddled centre.

p62. David Ruston: Is there any difference between ‘Niphetos’ and Mrs Herbert Stevens? You have got me a bit worried. I know that ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ is a seedling of ‘Niphetos’ and I have them together and I cannot tell the difference. I am wondering whether, when I imported ‘Niphetos’, it wasn’t ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ that I imported.
Walter Duncan: To be quite honest I do not know. The plants I grew years ago of ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ I know well. ‘Niphetos’ I don’t know well enough to define. Does anybody know the answer to that? My plants of 'Mrs Herbert Stevens' were about one and a half metres high. The wood was red. They definitely hung their head. The flowers formed in fives with very light yellow-green leaves. In general, I don’t know but it could be the case that they are still the same here.
David Ruston: I asked in France and Europe about ‘Niphetos’ and they all looked at me and said that a couple of years ago they had a very cold winter and all the plants died.
(1993)  
 
Hahndorf Conference. Walter Duncan. Teas and Noisettes.
p58. 'Mrs. Herbert Stevens' (1910) is a lovely white Tea; a huge bush about two metres high. With its nodding heads, it is a graceful plant in every sense of the word. There is not much light green foliage at the base of the plant, so it is probably best kept at the back of the bed. There is also a true climbing form of this rose. As Maureen explained yesterday, it is a true climber rather than a mutated climber. it does not repeat-bloom.

Niphetos. There are two forms of this rose, a bush form which appeared in 1843 and the climbing form which was first propagated in 1889. It has charming creamy buds opening to pure white with pointed petals, which highlight a muddled centre.

p62. David Ruston: Is there any difference between Niphetos and 'Mrs Herbert Stevens'? You have got me a bit worried. I know that ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ is a seedling of ‘Niphetos’ and I have them together and I cannot tell the difference. I am wondering whether, when I imported ‘Niphetos’, it wasn’t ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ that I imported.
Walter Duncan: To be quite honest I do not know. The plants I grew years ago of ‘Mrs Herbert Stevens’ I know well. ‘Niphetos’ I don’t know well enough to define. Does anybody know the answer to that? My plants of 'Mrs Herbert Stevens' were about one and a half metres high. The wood was red. They definitely hung their head. The flowers formed in fives with very light yellow-green leaves. In general, I don’t know but it could be the case that they are still the same here.
David Ruston: I asked in France and Europe about ‘Niphetos’ and they all looked at me and said that a couple of years ago they had a very cold winter and all the plants died.
(1997)  Page(s) 61.  
 
Noella Nabonnand is a kind of climbing China Tea. Very loose. Pinky red with violet smudges. It goes to three or four metres, and is one of the first roses of all to flower.
David Ruston.
(1993)  Page(s) 59.  
 
A climbing rose which does not repeat after its main flush, but is a fine variety with globular buds which eventually open into a large blowzy rose of dusty crimson.
Walter Duncan Teas and Noisettes
(1997)  Page(s) 63.  
 
Heritage Roses in Australia - 3rd Nat Conf., Fremantle 1997
David Ruston. Tea Rose Symposium.
Paul Lédé. I’ve only got a young plant of her, but she’s lovely. She’s classed as a Hybrid Tea as a bush and a Noisette as a climber. And we’ve got her in the climbing Teas. She’s apricoty buff and she’s absolutely lovely.
(2002)  Page(s) 38. Vol 24, No. 3.  .  
 
Coleen Houston. An Article in 1999 by Brenda Weir of Hay Bishop’s Lodge Management Committee:
As a result of detective work associated with identifying roses at Bishop’s Lodge, Hay, NSW, some of our garden committee began to look at other old surviving roses in the district. We became aware of the unusual early blooming of some Thelangerin roses when the McFarland family, who own this old grazing property near Hay, sent roses to arrange in the church for the September funeral of a young friend. Almost a year later on 27th July, 1992, Coleen Houston and I visited neighbouring Thelangerin and collected cuttings of these interesting roses, which grew in the garden begun by Mrs. Harold McFarland around 1922. The Thelangerin Tennis Court Rose is a full, creamy, mauve/pink-centred, spring flowering climber. It has the appearance of a vigorous climbing Tea Rose and is budded onto a small mauve flowered understock with indica major characteristics.
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