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9th International Heritage Rose Conference Proceedings. Charleston, South Carolina
 
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 88.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. .....The rose masquerading under this ['Adam'] name is a climbing tea descended from 'Gloire de Dijon', 'Mme. Berard'.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 88.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. .....The rose masquerading under this ['Adam'] name is a climbing tea descended from 'Gloire de Dijon', 'Mme. Berard'.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 88.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. "Arcadia Louisiana Tea" has a study name that indicates where it was found. It came to us by way of Malcolm Manners. The large, but truly delicate, pink, globular to cupped flowers are strongly fragrant. A frequent extra is a large green eye hidden in the center.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 88.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. Bearing a close resemblance in many characters to the last rose is "Rubens" (1859). Originally collected by Fred Boutin in Mexico for the Huntington, I have found it in several places in California. I am not absolutely convinced of the name since Gwen Fagan pictures it as 'Archimede' (1855) in her book Roses at the Cape of Good Hope and rosarians in Bermuda know it, incorrectly as 'Catherine Mermet'.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 87.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. Beaute Inconstante (1892) came to me from the Antique Rose Emporium in Texas. There is much confusion about this rose. It should be a vigorous climber according to some authors. I tentatively suggest that this may be 'Comtesse Riza du Parc' (1876) of the "bronzed rose" color according to Henry Ellwanger's description.
(15 Oct 2001)  
 
p37. Malcolm M. Manners. A Brief Explanation of DNA Analysis.
....It cannot identify a historic variety, if we don't have a known specimen of the historic variety to work with. For example, there are several candidates for the "true" 'Slater's Crimson China' in commerce. We can easily determine if those candidates are closely related to each other. But, lacking the original, guaranteed "true" 'Slater's Crimson China', we can never hope to prove that any one of the extant roses is the real thing.

p93. Marijke Peterich. The Preservation of Old Garden Roses in Bermuda.
In the logo is the rose 'Slater's Crimson China' as we now know, then only known by its local name "Belfield". It was designed by Lady Conyers in 1955 and appears on our stationary, our membership pin, etc. Mr. Richard Thomson, the well-known rosarian, came to Bermuda in 1953 to visit Mrs. Laura Pattisson. She showed him all the roses she knew and also this little red rose growing against a wall of a slave cottage, named Belfield, in Somerset. He was very excited and took samples home for scientific verification. when he returned in July 1956 for a lecture he confirmed that this little red rose was indeed 'Slater's Crimson China'.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 97.  
 
"Bermuda's Catherine Mermet". A Medium-sized bush, up to a height of five ft (1.5m) with a spreading form. The rounded leaves are medium gray with coppery, widely-toothed edges and leaf stalks with a prickle on the reverse. They have finely bristled edges. The buds are pointed, with tiny foliations on the sepals and show a medium to deep pink colour. They open to flesh-coloured double blooms with the slightest hint of faint lilac-pink on the outer petals. Although the three to four inch (7.5 - 10cm) blooms usually have beautiful form, it is not unusual for them to have a split or muddled centre. They tend to spot when it rains. This is an excellent rose for cutting. Also this rose is at variance with the 'Catherine Mermet' found elsewhere.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 88.  
 
Phillip Robinson. Tea Roses. Bearing a close resemblance in many characters to the last rose is "Rubens" (1859). Originally collected by Fred Boutin in Mexico for the Huntington, I have found it in several places in California. I am not absolutely convinced of the name since Gwen Fagan pictures it as 'Archimede' (1855) in her book Roses at the Cape of Good Hope and rosarians in Bermuda know it, incorrectly as 'Catherine Mermet'.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 96.  
 
Marijke Peterich. The Preservation of Old Garden Roses in Bermuda.
"[Bermuda] Cottage Rose", a mystery rambler, which grows in several locations in Bermuda. It flowers on short stems in large clusters on very long canes. Foliage is dark-green and finely toothed with two or three prickles on the underside of the leaves. It is very prone to blackspot. Buds are fat, slightly pointed and show bright pink before opening to flat round blooms 1 1/2 inches (4-5cm) across. Sometimes with white streaks.
(15 Oct 2001)  Page(s) 97.  
 
Marijke Peterich. The Preservation of Old Garden Roses in Bermuda.
"Bermuda Kathleen". A cutting came from the garden of Mrs. Hilda Horsfield, our president in 1956-58. The growth habit is upright, and it can be kept as a bush or a climber. The foliage is delicate, medium green and healthy. Blooms are in sprays. Buds are pointed, with somewhat foliated sepals and open into small, single, apple-blossom pink blooms, about1 1/2 inch (4 cm) across, which grow darker with age. Maybe a chance seedling of 'Mutabilis'. Here is "Bermuda Kathleen" close-up.
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