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HubertG
most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by Jon_in_Wessex
When I spoke with Keith Money a few years ago he confirmed the 'Lady Mary' growing at Mottisfont (and photographed by Billy) is his 1975 find. So we at least know that :)
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 4 days ago by HubertG
The fact alone that 'Lady Mary Fitzwilliam' was well regarded and used as a seed parent in the late 19thC, should eliminate the current rose grown under this name as the real thing, since it doesn't seem to normally set hips.
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most recent 7 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 7 days ago by HubertG
I saw this photo and wanted to comment what a pretty pink colour it is, almost like 'Lorraine Lee'. I looked up the pedigree first and see it is from 'Lady Mann' a cross of 'Lorraine Lee'. It must get its colouring from this.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 7 days ago by Girija and Viru
Yes you are right, Adrianna Zari is a cross between (Echo x R.gigantea) x Lady Mann, which aAs Lorraine Lee in its pedigree. While it is possible that the colouring has come from Lorraine Lee, since the cross is a complicated one, one can ever be sure about rose pigments
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 7 days ago by HubertG
Yes, that's true, the inheritance of colour is not straightforward I guess. However 'Lorraine Lee' is a very distinctive pink and 'Adriana Varri' is very reminiscent of it.. In fact when I grew 'Jessie Clark' the parent of 'Lorraine Lee' and a direct Gigantea hybrid, the buds of that rose were rather similar to 'Lorraine Lee' although it faded fairly quickly. One could even speculate because of this that some of that particular shade of pink might come from 'Mme. Martignier', the parent of 'Jessie Clark'.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 7 days ago by Girija and Viru
It would interest you to know that the great Australian nurseryman Niuewesteeg suggested that I use Lady Mann suggested that I use Lady mann in my breeding when I visited him in Melbourne many years ago.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 7 days ago by HubertG
That is interesting because Alister Clark himself is supposed to have held 'Lady Mann' in higher esteem than 'Lorraine Lee' and I remember reading that he said about 'Lorraine Lee' at the time around its introduction that he couldn't hope to breed anything better.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 7 days ago by Girija and Viru
We are great admirers of A. Clark and his roses.. we grow many of them, and we have visited the Bulla Garden and have the books written on him, as I too am a rosa gigantea hybridiser.
We have named one of our gigantea hybrids ' Alister's Gift'
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most recent 7 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 7 days ago by Margaret Furness
Interesting - not "thornless or almost".
Would someone please post a photo of the stem and bud of a known Paul Neyron; I've seen Patricia's photos but don't know if that was a found or known plant. I'm wondering about our foundling (with several study names including "Miss Curry"). Patricia suggested Paul Neyron for "Miss Curry" some time ago, but it isn't thornless.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 7 days ago by HubertG
I'm fairly certain that I've seen good photographs in some of the early 20th century American catalogues online. I can't remember which ones but I'll search when I have some time.
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most recent 8 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 20 DEC 16 by Margaret Furness
Collected by John Nieuwesteeg and named for the family who grew it.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 20 DEC 16 by Patricia Routley
Thank you Margaret.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 9 days ago by HubertG
How regularly does this repeat? It does look more HT than anything else. It actually reminds me a bit of the early illustrations of 'Lady Mary Fitzwilliam'.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 8 days ago by Margaret Furness
The expert nurseryman who collected it says it's Portland. I can't answer re repeat but will keep watching it.
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