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HubertG
most recent 5 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 days ago by Give me caffeine
Nice one. Good to know. :)
What is causing the colour of the water?
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 5 days ago by HubertG
It's just a pink vase with some yellow at the base. I think the refraction of the light makes the water look rather pink. It's just plain water; no additives. Strangely the pink water effect is more exaggerated in the photo than in real life.
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most recent 6 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 22 AUG by Give me caffeine
One of my cuttings (originally bagged February 12, 2021) has just put out its first flower. Not much scent at all. Pleasant enough, but fairly faint. I'm not sure if this is due to the small size of the plant (about 40 cm) but it's definitely not a strong or even moderate scent at this stage.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 6 days ago by HubertG
I had the same experience. My first bloom from a cutting-grown plant had a really refined, sweet fragrance with hints of freesia but it was quite faint most of the time. It seems that the quality of the scent is there but not the quantity, at least for me with its first flower. I hope it improves too because I liked the scent.
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most recent 12 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 6 OCT 19 by Jay-Jay
Just WOW! Amazing.
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Reply #1 of 15 posted 7 OCT 19 by HubertG
Yes, it is! I would say thanks Jay-Jay but it isn't mine but my sister's. ;-)
It has been rather neglected over the years, not pruned very much except for some larger branches taken out. It's on somewhat sandy soil and certainly on its own roots now as I planted the graft below the ground.
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Reply #2 of 15 posted 7 OCT 19 by Jay-Jay
Hope that mine will get as huge in the future.
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Reply #3 of 15 posted 9 OCT by HubertG
Unfortunately this specimen fell down in a gale the other day and split in two at the base where the limbs fork . It's currently lying more or less flat on the ground. The foliage from one half is wilting but the other half appears OK so presumably the roots from that side are still functioning.

Obviously we're hoping to save it, but I think half of it is gone. It will need a huge cut-back and hopefully it will reshoot as it is on its own roots. I'm taking plenty of cuttings.

Does anyone have any advice on what to do in this situation?

Also, would anyone in Australia like cuttings from this rose as I have plenty of material? I'd like to be able to know it survives elsewhere if mine don't strike and we lose the bush.
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Reply #4 of 15 posted 9 OCT by Jay-Jay
That's a real pity Hubert!
I wish You a "Lucky Strike"... and not the one that smokes.
Hope volunteers will submit themselves to propagate this rose and cherish it , like You did.
Best Regards, Jay-Jay.
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Reply #5 of 15 posted 9 OCT by Margaret Furness
Nice to "hear" you again Jay-Jay.
The garden of my new house has three Teas, and I think one is Mrs BRC, so I won't ask for cuttings, thanks.
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Reply #11 of 15 posted 11 OCT by Jay-Jay
So no fries of Frisians any more around Your garden any more? You had a wonderful place to live, as far as I could make up from Your photo's Margaret.

I'm not back, but maybe it looked like that, as if I didn't visit HMF at all the past months...
But I did so now and then due to circumstances.
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Reply #12 of 15 posted 11 OCT by Margaret Furness
The Friesians I saw on holiday in Tasmania, but I did have occasional kangaroos at my place.
Yes it was a lovely place to live, but 2.2ha became more than I could manage. None of us are getting younger!
Best wishes.
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Reply #13 of 15 posted 11 OCT by Jay-Jay
Yup,
2.2 ha is a lot to manage!
And Yup I'm experience the same getting older and a little balder.
None of us are...? I'm not English speaking, but it feels a bit odd for me. In Dutch none would be singular => None of us is getting Younger.
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Reply #14 of 15 posted 11 OCT by Margaret Furness
You're right. English usage is a bit careless at times. Or mine is.
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Reply #7 of 15 posted 10 OCT by HubertG
Thanks Jay-Jay, and it is indeed good to hear from you again.

Margaret, may I ask what the other Teas are?

Duchesse, no worries, I'll send you a private message.
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Reply #8 of 15 posted 10 OCT by Margaret Furness
One is thornless so I'm assuming Mrs Dudley Cross. Not sure about the third yet - I've sent photos to Billy. Planted 15 years ago so not rare. I will be planting a few roses but nothing like the number I had before.
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Reply #6 of 15 posted 10 OCT by Duchesse
I'd like to grow some cuttings please
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Reply #9 of 15 posted 10 OCT by HubertG
Thanks Margaret, I hope you identify them all.
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Reply #10 of 15 posted 11 OCT by Margaret Furness
The third is Maman Cochet. A nice selection to inherit.
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Reply #15 of 15 posted 12 days ago by Mila & Jul
Hi Hubert - i would try to chip the buds...or graft short sticks with one bud each...to increase the number of "tries"... I d volunteer but live in Germay... Best, jul
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most recent 11 OCT SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 30 MAR 20 by Patricia Routley
“From Pitcairn”.....in what decade?
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 30 MAR 20 by Rupert, Kim L.
This is the discussion from the Heritage Roses of San Juan Bautista on Face Book. Jill Perry is the Curator of the San Jose Heritage Rose Garden and has been active in the preservation of the roses at San Juan Bautista for some years. "Jill Perry: I should explain a bit about the Pitcairn rose. We know there was one from there in about 1937. The owner said it would have pride of place in his garden. We also know that Pitcairn Island received roses from England after the Panama Canal opened and the island became a stop on the route between England and New Zealand and Australia. So whatever the rose was it probable was bred in England in the early 1900s. There are two unknowns in the garden now, and we wonder if either the HT or the HP in that clump behind the Rose of Castile is that rose. HTs were more common then, so it would be the more likely of the two. On the other hand, the Pitcairn rose could have died, and those two roses are just mysteries like many other SJB roses."
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 11 OCT by HubertG
The photos of blooms posted today have similarities with and remind me very much of 'Maman Cochet'. However this foundling is a Hybrid Tea? Perhaps it's some early Dickson HT as some of those seem to have a lot of Tea blood in their breeding. It would be interesting to see photos of the bush and its habit.
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