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HubertG
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Initial post 2 days ago by HubertG
The full page advertisement here:
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most recent 5 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by HubertG
I just came across and uploaded the image of 'Barcelona' from the Bobbink & Atkins 1936 catalogue. It shows more detail of the leaves than other images and also shows interesting prickles and stipules. The stipules appear to have a reddish central vein. This all might be helpful (or not) in identifying what's what with the US 'Barcelona' and Australian "David Martin's No.41". Here's a detail:
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
Thank you HubertG. I have my original own-root bush and now a Fortuneana-budded bush. I’ll take my iPad out into the garden and compare - but not today.
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most recent 5 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by HubertG
Last winter I bought 'St Francis Xavier' to try out and so far I'm very pleased with it. Inspired by the photo here of its bushy habit, I planted it into a large decorative terracotta pot. It has done well and I feel it will only improve over time. This rose has a gorgeous strong rich damask scent and dark but bright red flowers with a black overlay. It seems to be very quick to repeat too.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 5 days ago by Margaret Furness
George Thomson told me there were 3 from the same crossing (I think from the same hip, but my memory is uncertain). One was a very double terracotta red, also named for a school (Annesley), and similarly well scented, but I don't think it's around now. The third was pink, and I don't think it was released.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 5 days ago by HubertG
It's worth growing for the fragrance only which is stronger than Muriel Linton (Hadley) but more complex too. It's hard to describe the components but I detect something like lychee in it as well as the classic old rose Damask scent. It doesn't seem to set hips (at least not for me) so doesn't really need deadheading either and keeps sending out new shoots. Since I'm virtually frost-free I'm looking forward to seeing how late into the colder months it will continue to flower. A medium-sized rather than large flower, it's worth trying out. Ross Roses seem to be the only supplier.
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Initial post 6 days ago by HubertG
I came across this in Father Schoener's own publication 'World's Best Roses' 1930.

"ARRELLAGA, HP. Large glowing pink buds and gigantic flowers of vivid pink with a light golden glow. Very fragrant and lasting. Long stems, and the plant blooms with great abundance. Foliage very handsome and healthy. Partly of Rosa Gigantea. $2.00."

I thought the reference to some Gigantea breeding was interesting as it isn't usually quoted in the pedigree. I guess the only room for the Gigantea is in the seedling with Centifolia breeding crossed with 'Mrs John Laing'.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 6 days ago by jedmar
Thank you for the reference. This and other Schoener rose references added from the 1933 Edition.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 6 days ago by HubertG
You're welcome, I noticed there were several Schoener roses not in the database. Thanks for adding them.
He certainly liked very disparate crosses. I can well believe R. gigantea is in 'Arrilaga' going by his other work. Look at 'Pittsburgh' which has similar lines.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 6 days ago by jedmar
"Seedling of Provence Rose" in the seed parent seems strange. Does it really say so in the 1930 catalogue? The combination Frau Karl Druschki/John Laing/R. gigantea in a different version can also be found in 'Pittsburgh'
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 6 days ago by HubertG
No, the only mention of its background in the 1930 publication is the reference posted above with the Gigantea breeding.
In his 1922 "general catalog" I find this on page 37:
"Arrillaga, H. T. Seedling of Province Rose X Mrs. John Laing X Frau Karl Druski, clear pink color, very large size of flower, wood and foliage. Should surely do well almost anywhere in the country. A mere garden rose."
No mention of R. gigantea, no bracketing in the parentage, and spelling with an 'i'.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 5 days ago by jedmar
Isn't that strange?
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