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Initial post today by Nola Z5a WI
I believe I paid for premium membership but it’s not showing up. Thank you.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted today by jedmar
You have a star against your name, which indicates premium membership. Try logging out and back in again.
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Initial post 10 AUG by Britzzzilla
Any tips on getting Marie-Henriette to bloom? I bought her this spring as 2nd year sapling and she grew nicely against a fence up three main stems to about 6' / 190cms, giving me a couple of flowers on the middle stem in May but nothing since. I've kept it trimmed of any crossing or thin canes, it has plenty of sun from early morning so would appreciate any ideas. Thank you!
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 22 DEC by mr.Bour
Did you try feeding her with sulfate of potash & gypsum (calcium sulfate)?
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Reply #2 of 3 posted today by Britzzzilla
Thank you for the advice and apologies to be slow responding. I’m not familiar with chemicals so is there an off the shelf product I can buy that would provide these for the rose?
Thanks again for the tip!
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Reply #3 of 3 posted today by veilchenblau
Do you have something like Seasol? (Seaweed solution). As that would give you the potassium (potash). Sometimes if the soil has too much nitrogen and not enough potassium you get too much growth but few blooms. Edit, so if you are using a commercial fertilizer already, stop using it before you try anything else. As maybe what you are currently using is just too high in nitrogen.
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Initial post 2 days ago by Nadene
I was wondering if anyone could please help me with identifying this rose. It had previously been labelled as Rembrandt. Its neighbours are Jacques Cartier and Pergolese (also in question). There is 4 to 5 plants in the full photo. I had taken the photos back in the beginning of February so they were already appearing to be faded. It still didn't seem to match the description and other photos.

I have also been looking at the other references, although unable to open the links. For example 'Philip Robinson Examines the Damask Perpetuals. Article (magazine) (2007) Page(s) 53-54'.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
I cannot help here Nadene. Your pale pink bloom reminds me of ‘Marquise Boccella' (Jacques Cartier), and the paler edged bloom is similar to some photos of ’Duchesse de Rohan’. You need to take some side-on photos of the receptacle, (remove one sepal to get a clear outline) and/or hip if it sets any.
Also photograph one whole leaf on your hand - try to show the shape of the stipule. One rarely carries a ruler but you always have your hand with you

The references are not links. If the administrator has not added the appropriate paragraphs, ithe reference will tell you which book/magazine to refer to for more information.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted today by Nadene
Thankyou,
I will do some more investigation.
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Initial post 16 JUN 17 by Badger Rose
This rose came back very strongly from winter after its first season. I only got one or two roses from it last year but this spring it has offered me dozens of pale, pretty blooms. The color is a bit subtle for me by itself, but when neighbor Dark Desire (whose color by itself is also kind of bland but in the opposite way) started blooming I really loved the combination. (WI, zone 5a)
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Reply #1 of 10 posted 16 JUN 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Mine was the same own-root, really stingy the 1st year. Then an English rosarian told me to give it more potassium .. second year it's an explosion of blooms for spring flush. Now for spring flush I use NPK 10-20-40, plus blood meal & gypsum, since zone 5a prunes roses short.
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Reply #2 of 10 posted 17 JUN 17 by Badger Rose
Great! Thanks for the info! As a novice I appreciate the advice.
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Reply #3 of 10 posted yesterday by peterdewolf
how did you get hold of 'potassium'
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Reply #4 of 10 posted yesterday by Give me caffeine
It's commonly available as compounds in many fertilisers, or in wood ash, or in compost. Obviously she wasn't referring to the pure metallic form.
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Reply #6 of 10 posted yesterday by veilchenblau
caffeinated, well...."The name 'potash' basically refers to potassium-bearing minerals or compounds" and it is mined, they dig it out of the ground. and you buy it from gardening centers. So, Peter was asking a fair question IMO. or NMM. Whatever. I'm going to have a coffee now. Cheers.
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Reply #7 of 10 posted yesterday by Give me caffeine
Sure, potassium sulphate is a pretty common one. Can add to acidity though, due to the sulphate ions, so not the best if your soil already has a lowish pH. Better to just buy a fertiliser that has a high potassium content. And if you have a wood fire in winter, the ash is a really good source of potassium and will not acidify your soil (quite the opposite).

And the name 'potash' literally refers to ash in a pot, which was how they used to extract potassium in the old days. :)
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Reply #8 of 10 posted yesterday by veilchenblau
regardless, one thing that is obvious is that no one was talking about a metal...as it's a mineral...
Peter has done quite a lot of work preparing his soil making seaweed tea for his garden, if you bothered to read his posts before you got snippy with him......
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Reply #9 of 10 posted yesterday by Give me caffeine
Actually I thought he might have been getting snippy. Apologies to Peter if he wasn't.

And potassium is a metal. It's highly reactive though, so rarely seen outside laboratories. The potassium compounds that you usually encounter are technically potassium salts. Potassium sulphate is much the same as iron sulphate: metal atoms combined with sulphate ions. :)
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Reply #10 of 10 posted today by veilchenblau
He's using seaweed "soup" already on his roses. He probably doesn't need potassium supplementation. We're just off on a tangent now. apologies to Peter and the original poster.
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Reply #5 of 10 posted yesterday by veilchenblau
hi peter, the seaweed you are using would have potassium in it already. It's a great source for it. edit, You can also buy potash from gardening centers, but I'd say the seaweed you are using is fine or better. Cheers.
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