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Sammy's Garden
most recent 5 JUL HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 JUL by Sammy's Garden
My garden has disappeared. I cannot get in touch with anyone to find out what happened.
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most recent 16 FEB 19 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 13 FEB 19 by Sammy's Garden
Where are my roses?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 13 FEB 19 by jedmar
Photos are there. Are you missing a plant listing?
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 13 FEB 19 by Sammy's Garden
The prompt says I have no roses. I have had roses listed here for years, and have paid my fee -- I pay it regularly.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 16 FEB 19 by Patricia Routley
Sammy, I have no idea what happened to your list of roses. It is listed as being last updated on January 29, 2014. I can only hope that you kept your private records as well. Can I offer to help you reinstate your HelpMeFind listing? I can go through your comments and photos and add anything I see there. And then you can add anything that is missing.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 16 FEB 19 by HMF Admin
Issues like this are most always a function of a member having multiple member accounts or garden listings.
Could you have opened a new member account at some point or maybe started a second garden listing. It is not likely your list is lost.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 16 FEB 19 by Sammy's Garden
Is there a way that I can find them? When I last paid, I looked through them. I changed my email a few years ago, but I have seen the roses since then. How could they have just disappeared?
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most recent 10 DEC 16 HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 10 DEC 16 by Sammy's Garden
Sweet Frances is one of the most beautiful roses in my yard. It gets little or no black spot, grows to about 6 feet, is a beautiful color, and grows well with Perle d'Or. I have many pictures of it, but did not save them with the names. I hope to enter a picture soon since it could be close to my favorite out of about 95 roses.
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most recent 16 APR 14 SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 20 JAN 13 by Sammy's Garden
"Rival de Paestum" This is a beautiful rose, but who names the roses?
Paestum was an old city, and in the languages I tried from Google, Rival is rival. Why would a beautiful white rose be named a rival to an old city?

I understand names like Souvenir de la Malmaison. I understand names that indicate an honor to a person or a Prince - princess, but why name a beautiful white rose a name like this?

(Now I need to look up Arethusa.)

I just did look up Arethusa, and the answer is on HMF. I am pleased we can edit.

This is a curious question, and in no way an indication that I have a desperate need for a response. I just think about these things from time to time.

Sammy
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 20 JAN 13 by jedmar
The roses of Paestum were apparently famous in ancient Roman times. The poet Virgil (1st century BC) mentions reblooming roses of Paestum (biferi rosaria Paesti). The name was therefore given by Béluze to mean "rivals the roses of Paestum".
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Reply #2 of 3 posted 20 JAN 13 by Sammy's Garden
How very interesting. Thank you so much.
I love the antique roses because of the link I feel to my family, and history in general. It is amazing where you mind can go when you think of the life of Virgil.

I really appreciate your response.
Sammy
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Reply #3 of 3 posted 16 APR 14 by CybeRose
In this case, Beluze was comparing his 'Rival de Pestum' to Plantier's rather similar 'Reine de Pestum'.

Annales des Sciences Physiques et Naturelles, D'Agriculture et D'Industrie pp. 493-497 (1840)

Reine de Pestum (Plantier). Fleurs en bouquets de 4 à 6, grandes, blanches, à centre jaune; boutons allongés, à sépales dentés, se réfléchissant avant l'épanouissement des pétales; folioles lancéolées, ondulées; rameaux et pétioles pourprés. Trés-élégante; réussit très-bien greffée; faible franche de pied.

Rivale de Pestum (Beluz., n° 9, 1839). Écorce, petioles et pédicelles rougeâtres; folioles plus petites et moins ondulées que celles de la Reine de Pestum; boutons rosés, arrondis; pétales en coeur (tronqués dans R. de Pestum). Réussit beaucoup mieux de bouture que la Reine de Pestum.

Karl
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