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Initial post today by Michael Garhart
'Papaya Panarosa' is described as 6' by Ludwig's, and the photos for it are more on the copper side than carrot or mango side of orange. Fryer's 'Wildfire' is quite short.
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Initial post 20 MAY 17 by Michael Garhart
Half of the nurseries bought like 20-30 Mister Lincolns each, and none of this rose. Holy crap. Why? Mister Lincoln is like 10' here, lol. A few nurseries ordered in 5 or so Lasting Love, which is okay, but completely defoliates here. I will never understand the nursery business mindset.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 20 MAY 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Mr. Lincoln is a sparse bloomer, so it doesn't use up the calcium/potassium in a pot, esp. for a high-rain climate, which leaches out those nutrients. Mr. Lincoln always look good in a pot at local store.

Firefighter is a heavy bloomer, which depletes calcium/potassium, and it breaks out in blackspot AFTER blooming, unless those minerals are abundant, as in alkaline clay. My Firefighter improved after I moved from acidic potting soil to heavy alkaline clay. So the stingy roses like Mr. Lincoln look really healthy in a pot, but the heavy bloomers: Firefighter, Buxom Beauty can be blackspot-fest after done with blooming.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 21 MAY 17 by Michael Garhart
For this area (NW Oregon), Firefighter is healthy enough. Just the lower 1/3rd was affected. 'Velvet Fragrance' was by far the healthiest fragrant red HT I have grown here, but the blooms turn to rice crispies if the sun even looks at it sideways. lol

Mister Lincoln can get up to 2-3" diameter wood here. It is a literal monster. 'Oklahoma's is the same way. The modern garden just cannot accommodate here. My question/rant was more-so local nursery owners not realizing that or reaching out to the local societies for updated information, like they used to do.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 21 MAY 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
HMF is the best source for info., but I wish folks would specify their soil & climate & planting zone & what region of the country. People want to hold on to "old generalizations", rather than learning. Like nearby rose park, I was shocked to see them dumping sulfur in the spring... they burnt Tamora (prefers alkaline), also induced RRD (rose rosette disease) on Pink Traviata (Meilland rose) which also prefers alkaline. Gypsum is acidic, I killed lots of earthworms using that stuff, and it burns my finger. Gypsum has calcium plus sulfur.

I made the same mistake years ago: dumping sulfur plus high nitrogen chemical fertilizer on a Grandma' Blessing rose, changing my soil pH to acidic. It immediately came down with RRD five years ago. That's the ONLY rose with RRD in my 30+ years of growing roses, among 100+ varieties. I planted Radio Times in the exact spot, but I raised the pH with more alkaline clay, and no RRD ever since. I wish folks would stop generalizations, "Mr. Lincoln for fragrant reds", "roses prefer acidic", and "roses need full-sun". Own-root roses are completely different from each other.
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Reply #5 of 7 posted today by DLEverette_NC_Zone7b
Rice crispies....got a nice laugh from that lol
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 3 FEB by ac91z6
Replying because I want to archive all the information in this post for future reference about Mr. Lincoln and Firefighter. Good information here!
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Reply #6 of 7 posted today by Michael Garhart
I would put Claret and Firefighter as the best deep red sniffers sold in North America at the moment, although I know more are coming in the future. I would rate Heart Song behind, although the plant is superior, the scent is only half of the other sniffers.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted today by Nastarana
Have you tried asking nursery owners how they go about their selections?
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Initial post 1 FEB 06 by Rosenschule Ruf
Ther are sometimes problems with semiplena and suaveolens because the only difference is that semiplena has less petals, but its easy if you are able to compare the flowers. Do that at the photos!
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Reply #1 of 3 posted yesterday by Nastarana
I just planted an 'alba suavolens', which I bought from High Country Roses, between 'alba semiplena' and 'alba maxima' . Next spring I should be able to compare all three, provided I can protect them from Peter Rabbit over the winter.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted today by Rosenschule Ruf
so if you will try. paint the canes with bottermilk.as Long as there is no rain it will Keep him away
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Reply #3 of 3 posted today by Nastarana
Buttermilk! I was thinking of wire cages around each. We do get plenty of rain and snow both.
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Initial post 19 NOV 13 by Amy's Idaho Rose Garden
I also did research on Simsalabim. I have wanted it forever and could never get my hands on it.
The word is Scandinavian in origin. Appeared in a America in the 1900 used in a magic show, by a magician named Dante.
And yes Sim Sala Bim = Abracadabra.

Funny I had some thought about how much Simsalabim pictures looked like my Abracadabra!
Thank you Kim for bringing this up.
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Reply #1 of 4 posted yesterday by Xoan Mos
Hi,
I am looking for a rose called abracadabra.
Can anyone point me to where I can get a cutting???
Much appreciated,
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Reply #2 of 4 posted yesterday by AzRoseLady
I do not know about a cutting. You can buy a rooted plant from forloveofroses.com
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Reply #3 of 4 posted today by Xoan Mos
AzRose Lady,
Thank you so much for this its really helpful.
I visited the site and found similar roses but I couldn't find the Abracadabra.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted today by AzRoseLady
It is under Floribunda. That is its current classification.
https://forloveofroses.com/product-category/floribunda-roses/
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