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Roses, Clematis and Peonies
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Initial post yesterday by moriah
My own root Sharifa is doing fantastic here in Western Washington. My soil is rocky and drains fast so I need to water often. This rose is in partial shade and has a lovely strong perfume.
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Initial post 3 DEC 16 by Patricia Routley
This red rose, "Whatley Crescent", recently threw a sport from the base. The sporting bloom was pink, somewhat like 'Briarcliff' (which was a sport of Columbia). I apologise that I was running a bit too fast to stop and take a photo, but I am now wondering if the red "Whatley Crescent" could be 'Red Columbia', 1920.

Later edit. Probably not feasible because so far, I cannot find 'Red Columbia' entering Australia.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted yesterday by HubertG
Is 'Warrior' from Paul 1906 worth considering? It was a winter flowering tea-like HT.
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Initial post 24 JUN by Andrew from Dolton
You make my northern hemisphere winter solstice of holly and ivy look extremely dull and pedestrian. The nights will be drawing out for you for the next six months now.
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 28 JUN by billy teabag
This is true - and by Summer solstice there should be some nice crispy blooms to arrange.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
Will you be posting any more pictures of your wonderful midwinter roses this year?
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Reply #3 of 3 posted yesterday by HubertG
I'd certainly look forward to a special treat of Billy's roses too!
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Initial post yesterday by HubertG
Rose Listing Omission

Marie Louise

"Marie Louise - (Sarter, 1855) (T.) Light blush; a profuse bloomer and strong branching grower; very popular."

From Leedle Floral Co 1914 Fall catalogue, page 28
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Reply #1 of 2 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
I've temporarily put this under 'Alba rosea carnea' (tea, Lartay, 1863). What do you think?
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Reply #2 of 2 posted yesterday by HubertG
I can't find references on the breeder Sarter (or Sartre). It does say it's a tea. Maybe it is a locally bred American tea that simply persisted because of the local demand. It's a mystery.
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