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Lavenderlace
most recent 8 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Hello Maryellen,
Does your 'New Dawn' show any signs of a second flush this year?
Regards, Andrew.
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 8 days ago by happymaryellen
No darnit....After reading so many people having the same problem I think I’m gonna take it out this winter I wanted to repeat with her on this fence. I guess it’s a live and learn right?
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Marlorena
No luck then Andrew... I'm feeling a whole lot better that it was nothing to do with me... thanks for asking around here...
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Thanks Maryellen. My plant only stopped repeating when I moved it and now it competes with a cut leafed elder. Maybe it needs more food and moisture to flower well although it has made some very long growths. Interesting to look at other pictures of 'New Dawn' grown in warmer countries. The flowers are quite a bit pinker than mine which looks white at a distance, the same colour as 'Madame Alfred Carrière'.
Marlorena, there was a light ground frost in my garden this morning.
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Marlorena
Andrew, I wondered if you might have had one because I know you're in a pocket there...... it dropped to 5C here last night... I've had the heating on...
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
I knew we were in for a cold night yesterday evening because the moors, about 20KM away, were absolutely crystal clear and the sky rich blue.
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Lavenderlace
Yes, thanks Andrew for asking around! I can't believe that I have so many of them now with what appears to be no hope.

There is a lady in Ohio who says hers is quite old, like 80 years, and it reblooms. So based on hers, HMF ratings, and the Heirloom website, I was hopeful. But now I'm wondering, because of the age, what if she doesn't have ND after all? I believe that she's younger than eighty!
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most recent 8 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 26 MAR by Nola Z5
Just informational Heirloom Roses lists this as Zone 5-10.
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 28 MAR by Lavenderlace
Thanks Nola, for getting this updated! I have dozens of Lemon Spice and could never understand how a rose previously listed as Z7 did so well in single digits.
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 28 MAR by Nola Z5
Lavenderlace, I have one on order for this spring and I can't wait! What zone are you in and can you tell me how yours are doing and how long you've had them in? Do you winter protect them, and if so with what?
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 28 MAR by Lavenderlace
I'm in no-spray Z8, almost 7, but I've had many of them through two winters of ice storms with temperatures plunging into the single digits, which is not normal for us. I have more than two dozen, need to count! I keep buying them to replace others because they happen to do so well here.

Their leaves stayed on all winter and I can't think of any canes that I even had to prune this spring. I didn't winter protect, other than surrounding with about a foot of manure/pine shavings even though half are on the north side with full shade in the winter, four hours at best in the summer. The full sun ones in 100+ temperatures do super also though.

Hope that helps! What zone are you in? I hope that she works out for you also!
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 29 MAR by Nola Z5
I'm in zone 5. I mounded my roses with mushroom compost and wood mulch this winter, intending to spread it out this spring but our winter has been very warm and short with little snow. We'll see how it turns out. Thank you for your comments though, it's always great to hear other rose enthusiast's experiences! I'm still learning, but very determined and any advice is much appreciated!
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Reply #5 of 6 posted 29 MAR by Lavenderlace
Thanks so much for sharing and please keep us posted on how she does!
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Reply #6 of 6 posted 8 days ago by Lavenderlace
Hi Nola! One thing that I thought that I would comment on is that here, own-root LS has a very low tolerance for poor drainage. Wet compost getting too high on lower canes seems to bother them faster than other varieties. We have make sure that her crown doesn't get too buried if that makes sense. Hope that yours are doing well!
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most recent 8 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 13 AUG by happymaryellen
I planted my new dawn in March 2016. It has grown like crazy! Last year in spring I got a full flush of blooms. This year I got a full flush blooms in spring. But it doesn’t seem to continue blooming. I am deadheading it, and doing so properly down to five leaves. I also have gotten a Normas amount of growth coming off of it, it’s extremely leggy. So the question I have is, is it too soon for me to expect to bloom all season long?
It is extremely healthy and happy and green, almost no disease, just a little bit of mildew lately. I live in Northern California I am in 100% full sun, and I’ve been fertilizing every three weeks with Max sea 16 1616 Any thoughts?
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Reply #1 of 12 posted 14 AUG by Lavenderlace
I have only been getting a big spring flush also! I've had several people tell me that they might have reverted back to Dr. W. Van Fleet. But I have a total of 16 from two vendors so that seems like a lot to all revert back. I'm very curious to see if this fall will have any blooms from the second vendor's, which are younger.
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Reply #2 of 12 posted 14 AUG by Andrew from Dolton
There is usually a good spring flush here then another scat of flower from August into September. This year was unusually hot and dry and so far there have been no second flush although it has put on plenty of new growth. Maybe extra watering could be the answer.
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Reply #3 of 12 posted 14 AUG by Marlorena
Tell me about it.... my history with this perplexing rose here in England goes back 20 years... I bought 2 in the 1990's, the first grew 20 foot with no rebloom... I then bought a 2nd rose during September one year, from a garden centre, where it was in bloom, so I knew I had the repeat type, but in the garden it once again grew 20 foot and didn't repeat... 10 years ago I bought yet another for my current garden, from Peter Beales… no rebloom... I met the late Mr Beales a year or so before he died and told him about it, that all these ND's seem to revert to Dr Van Fleet when you plant them... he couldn't understand it and offered to replace my rose, but I gave up by then, and I'm now finished with New Dawn...

I can only hope you get some rebloom at some point.. I found it too frustrating...
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Reply #4 of 12 posted 14 AUG by Andrew from Dolton
Isn't 'Dr. W. Van Fleet' larger flowering than 'New Dawn'? My plant is only 5 years old growing 4M up into a cut leaved elder tree. If they revert surely that would happen gradually, not the whole plant change at once?
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Reply #6 of 12 posted 15 AUG by Marlorena
I wouldn't know about that Andrew, as far as I know, if it's a once bloomer it's Van Fleet but if it repeats it's New Dawn... If one buys it as New Dawn, and if it's to do with time or watering, then how many years do you have to wait before it gets into a rebloom cycle? that's what I would like to know... to be honest, I probably didn't go beyond 3 seasons with any of mine... I felt that was long enough, and I only deadheaded... let's see if Lavender Lace's roses rebloom this year...
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Reply #7 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Lavenderlace
Everything rebloomed immediately after all the rain a month ago but not a single bud on the New Dawns. We can have blooms to early December though so will report back if anything changes.
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Reply #10 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Marlorena
Thanks for keeping in touch about this.... I feel I'm shouting through a loud hailer, but if there's anyone in the world out there, who has a New Dawn that repeats... please sign in and tell us about it, because I'm dying to know ….

I'm going to check out a couple I know of in my local area, and see what they're doing...
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Reply #11 of 12 posted 8 days ago by Margaret Furness
There are photos on the hmf file taken in September, October, November in the northern hemisphere; so their plants re-bloom. I donated mine elsewhere because it was so prickly, and I can't recall what it did. It's a survivor rose in our Mediterranean climate.
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Reply #12 of 12 posted 8 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Yes Margaret it's certainly tough, I moved a fair sized plant a few years ago and never cut it back at all, planted it to grow in an elder tree, it didn't turn a hair just kept on growing. I used to get flowers in September but haven't for the last few years.
Some of the northern hemisphere pictures have been posted in the winter months, some members might not have posted them at the actual time of flowering.
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Reply #5 of 12 posted 15 AUG by Lavenderlace
My first ten grew to twenty feet extremely fast too, but has since slowed down. Andrew might have a good point about the extra watering as we are usually hot, humid, but quite dry. However, we just received seven inches of rain after our usual drought conditions. So hopefully that will be the push that it needs for a fall bloom!
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Reply #8 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
A plant growing in the village in a very dry position has put on hardly any growth and isn't re-flowering. My own 'New Dawn' put on a lot of new growth thanks to some irrigation during the hot dry summer, it shows no sign of re-flowering either. Others have had a good second flush, 'Rose de Rescht', 'Agnes', 'Jacques Cartier' and 'Quatre Saisons Blanc Mousseux' have all done well although 'Duchess of Portland' hasn't even tried. Others, Rosa cinnamomea Plena and the Dunwich Rosa are unexpectedly having another go.
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Reply #9 of 12 posted 9 days ago by Lavenderlace
Sounds like you have lots of blooms today also Andrew! I should have mentioned that I do irrigate, so it wasn't like mine were totally neglected to begin with. Though I do think that New Dawn can certainly tolerate neglect! Blooming seems to be another matter.
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most recent 24 AUG SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 10 JUN 16 by BroCad
This is year four for LEH in my garden. I have loved her from the beginning, even through an early scare with spider mites that took half of her in the first year before I knew what was happening. Since then she has not only recovered, but spread to around four feet in width and a height of around three feet. She gave me two new canes last year and another this spring. She is currently covered in buds, having opened only two flowers so far, which puts her as my latest of the returning roses. She vies with Munstead Wood as my most floriferous rose. Beautifully complex color range, intoxicating citrus fragrance, beautiful dainty, bronze new foliage, and little disease, usually confined to a bit of BS going into the fall. I understand some have had trouble wintering her in Northern Ohio, but I have her in a very sheltered spot where, with no special protection, she has come through two very fierce winters (those immediately preceeding this last very mild winter) with die-back to the snowline and a quick recovery. Outstanding rose in all respects.
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Reply #1 of 2 posted 1 JUN 17 by StrawChicago Alkaline clay 5a
Is you LEH grafted, or is it own-root, thanks for any info. I prefer own-root, but a few people reported its being weak as own-root for cold zone.
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Reply #2 of 2 posted 24 AUG by Lavenderlace
Mine are own-root but have continually bloomed through very high heat (over 110 F) for extended periods with daily watering in fast draining sandy soil. The size of the plant has stayed smaller than most Austins here in southern Z8, thankfully, with very nice foliage.
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