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jedmar
most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by Daniel Alm
Admins, there's something wrong with the lineage database for BRITE EYES. After the 6th generation of descendants, it repeats again from the 1st to 6th generation again ad infinitum. The descendants listed in the 21st generation are the exact duplicate of the 6th generation. Either Radler inbred or back crossed everything multiple times or there's a system error. Is there a fix for that? ~Benaminh
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 2 days ago by HMF Admin
We'll take a look - thanks so much for taking the time to alert us to this problem.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
The problem is not in the software, but in the declared parentages:
'Morning Magic' <-- RADspot <-- RADbrite <-- RADtee <-- RAD95.1016.17 <-- 'Morning Magic'

then the caroussel starts all over again! Perhaps Bill Radler can correct the error in this loop.
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Reply #5 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
Parentage of RADbrite is corrected, so that there is no loop any more. The only issue is that the declared parentage in PP 17'391 seems incorrect.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 2 days ago by Jay-Jay
I experienced the same at another look-up. It started all over at the beginning.
Can't recall the search.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by HMF Admin
Okay, thanks Jay-Jay.
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most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 2 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Does anyone know if Rosa multiflora seed needs to be stratified first or can germinate without cold treatment?
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Reply #1 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
Rosa multiflora grows in 300-2000m in China, so it would seem to need cold periods. In USA it is an invasive neophyte in a band from Kentucky to the East Coast. I found this text on Bugwood Wiki:
"In eastern North America, multiflora rose is abundant from the Great Plains (where the species has been planted as wind breaks) to the east coast. It occurs from northern Texas, Arkansas, Mississippi, Alabama, and Georgia in the south, north to the New England coast, central New York, southern Michigan, Wisconsin, and Minnesota. It occurs only as plantings south of central Georgia, probably because of the lack of cold temperatures needed to stimulate seed germination. The plant’s northern distribution is limited by its sensitivity to severe cold temperatures."
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Reply #2 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
Thank you Jedmar, the seeds are now in my refrigerator. The seeds are from a particularly deep pink flowered variety of the above dwarf sport.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
When I was in Switzerland, some years ago, on the train from Zurich to Kreuzlingen there were white rambler type roses growing wild on the embankments, sprawling on the ground. Would that have been multiflora?
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Reply #4 of 5 posted yesterday by jedmar
I must admit I have no idea! Rosa multiflora is not an invasive neophyte in Switzerland. Could it have been plantings of Rosa rugosa alba?
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Reply #5 of 5 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
No, it definitely had stems trailing on the ground and panicles of smallish flowers, maybe too prostrate to be multiflora.
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most recent yesterday HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 days ago by andrewandsally
The correct spelling is 'Ricordo ...' etc. I know this seems pedantic but when I tried at first looking it up on hmf I couldn't find it because I was spelling it correctly. I don't know how Jaeger's Rosenlexicon spells it; the GroenlooF site spells it with two "c" and, in consequence, at Sangerhausen the spelling error is repeated (as with all other varieties beginning with Ricordo.
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 3 days ago by jedmar
Rosenlexikon spells it with cc, Sangerhausen and Groenloof follow Jäger. We can add 'Ricordo...' if there is a reference with one c only. Yes, correct spelling of the word is 'Ricordo' but we have to follow references, too.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 3 days ago by andrewandsally
I understand that, but at present hmf does not recognise the correct spelling at all - as if such a rose didn't exist. Sangerhausen lists several other roses whose names begin with the same word as 'Riccordo...' rather than 'Ricordo...'. The trouble is that such errors begin to have a life of their on; the result of this is that looking, for instance, for 'Ricordo de Giosue' Carducci' in the index you would conclude wrongly that they don't have it.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
I can't read/speak any Italian either, but I see that Brent Dickerson (The Old Rose Adventurer, p447) notes:
Ricordo di Geo Chavez [Translation: "In Memory of Geo Chavez".]
Ricordo di Giosue Carducci ('Souvenir de Giosue Carducci') [Translation: "In Memory of Giosue Carducci".]

Might Recordo be something like.... a record... of the man?
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 2 days ago by andrewandsally
Ricordo = memory = (in rose parlance) souvenir (Fr.) = Andenken (German)
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 2 days ago by andrewandsally
Ricordo = memory = (in rose parlance) souvenir (Fr.) = Andenken (German)
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 2 days ago by Margaret Furness
I remember looking up emleke (sorry, can't do the accent on the middle e) because it occurs in the name of many Hungarian-bred roses. Google translate put it as Memories.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted yesterday by jedmar
That is a sufficient base, I suppose. This semms to be the only rose where the "Ricordo" spelling was missing; so be it.
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most recent 6 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 6 days ago by Matt's North Texas Rose Garden
What an unappealing name for such a lovely rose
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Reply #1 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Margaret Furness
It was named for the girl the breeder later married. I'd say it wins hands down over some modern names which are downright tacky.
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Reply #7 of 7 posted 6 days ago by jedmar
Léonie and Eugènie were daughters of Jean-Baptiste Lamesch, who had established a rose nursery in Dommeldingen, Luxembourg. So, it is another of those rose Family stories.
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Reply #2 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Rupert, Kim L.
Lambert raised and named the rose in 1899. He named one Leonie Lamesch, and a second, Eugenie Lamesch. Two years later, he married Leonie.
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Reply #3 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Margaret Furness
They went to St Petersburg for their honeymoon, and were invited by the Tsar to attend a court ball at The Hermitage, which was decorated with Lambert-bred roses. That's quite a compliment!
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Reply #4 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Rupert, Kim L.
What a marvelous continuation of the story, Margaret! Thank you!
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Reply #5 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Margaret Furness
Research by a Heritage Roses in Aus member, who wrote a series on major 19th century rose breeders for our Journal. And I've just found it among the References! I should learn to look there first.
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Reply #6 of 7 posted 6 days ago by Rupert, Kim L.
(Sheepishly) I guess I should, too!
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