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Andrew from Dolton
most recent 3 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 7 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Does anyone know what this rose might be? It is growing in several gardens in my village in Devon, UK. It grows in a similar way to 'Dorothy Perkins' or 'Excelsa'. The flowers open light pink but fade to white. The occasional flower has a few darker pink petals others with a few white petals
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 7 days ago by Palustris
Andrew, that's the closest rose yet to 'Debutante' that you have found. Check out the pedicels on your found rose and compare them to the photos of 'Debutante' taken in Woods Hole, MA.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 7 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Thank you. But it is quite different to the 'Debutante' we grow in the UK
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 7 days ago by Palustris
Andrew, I know that. That's why I thought you would be interested in comparing your found rose to the 'Debutante' that has a provenance directly to Walsh and has been growing in the same spot for 100 years.
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 4 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Do you think this rose could be 'White Dorothy Perkins'?
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Reply #5 of 8 posted 4 days ago by Palustris
The easiest method to determine 'White Dorothy' is to look for it to sport back and forth from white to pink. Another marker for both Dorothies is to look at the new growth. It is generally a "bronze" color. The flower in the photo doesn't look dark enough pink to be pink 'Dorothy Perkins'. I don't recall seeing varying shades of white to pink. I think they are generally either white or bubblegum pink. Finally, check out the pedicels; the Dorothies might have a few tiny hairs, but never a profusion of bristles.
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 4 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Is this too hairy? It does have the odd flower with a few darker pink flowers (No 5 picture in my first post) but the colour looks too dark for 'Dorothy Perkins'.
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 4 days ago by Palustris
Check out the pedicels of DP here:

https://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=21.267841
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 3 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Thanks.
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most recent 13 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 14 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Elderflower and Rosa gallica 'Officinalis' Turkish delight.
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Reply #1 of 1 posted 13 days ago by Jay-Jay
This kind of "British Delight" I do not know and never tasted that. On the other hand I produced Elderflower-Rose-lemon-lemonade with natural sparkles of CO2. Very nice when drinking/enjoying it cold on a hot day!
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most recent 13 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 22 MAY by Hamanasu
I recall reading something to the effect that gallicas' perfume (I think) is more intense on the dry flower. That seems to apply to Sweet Fairy, too. A tiny bloom, brought indoors and left to dry, developed a surprisingly strong scent.
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Reply #1 of 5 posted 22 MAY by Andrew from Dolton
After reading your post I picked a bloom and it's drying on the window sill right now.
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Reply #2 of 5 posted 22 MAY by Hamanasu
Let me know if it worked.
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Reply #3 of 5 posted 29 MAY by Andrew from Dolton
I don't think the fragrance got stronger as the flower dried, but after 7 days the flower smelt just as strong as freshly picked. Only the actual petals smell, the rest of the flower is scentless.
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Reply #4 of 5 posted 29 MAY by Hamanasu
Interesting. To my nose it seems more concentrated on the dry flower than the fresh one. I haven't kept mine for as long as you did, but good to know the scent on the dry flower is lasting... I'm thinking of airtight container and rose petal tea!
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Reply #5 of 5 posted 13 days ago by Hamanasu
So, Andrew, my plant has now come into its own, and you are right that there is no difference in the strength of scent between dry and fresh blooms: the fragrance is now nice and strong on the fresh flower too, and out of all proportion to its size!
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most recent 14 JUN HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 14 JUN by Andrew from Dolton
Has this rose been genetically tested?
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 14 JUN by jedmar
There is an article "Rosa Complicata" in Curtis's Botanical Magazine, January 14, 2004, by Barbara Jellett, Maurice Jay and Olivier Raymond, which seems to include DNA test results. Unfortunately this article is not freely accessible.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 14 JUN by Andrew from Dolton
Thanks Jedmar.
The RHS Encyclopedia of Roses says it was genetically tested and it is a canina hybrid.
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 14 JUN by jedmar
I think that statement of RHS is too simplistic: If you look at the 2017 reference which is based on the Jellett et al article. 'Complicata' is closer to R. gallica than to R. canina. Unfortunately, I haven't seen the original article.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 14 JUN by Andrew from Dolton
Thanks, yes I see. Suzanne Verrier says gallica x macrantha hybrid but canina and setigera have been suggested. It always reminds me a lot of Rosa canina.
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