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Initial post 7 JAN 16 by AquaEyes
I don't grow either, but I'm noticing some similarities between this rose and the rose currently being grown as 'Rembrandt' (not the original). Has anyone else made the comparisons?

http://www.helpmefind.com/rose/l.php?l=2.5182.0&tab=1

:-)

~Christopher
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Reply #1 of 3 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
Excellent suggestion Christopher. I will check my pedicel and receptacle today, but I am growing ‘Rembrandt’ in a different country.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted today by Patricia Routley
‘Rembrandt’ would work as far as the pedicel and smooth receptacle goes, but on this characteristic alone, so would ‘Paul Perras’ and another foundling of mine “Eileen Giblett’s No. 15” in the same bed.
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Reply #3 of 3 posted today by AquaEyes
Ah, but 'Plaul Perras' (aka what's being sold as 'Paul Ricault') has a different growth habit, and is once-blooming.

I guess I'll compare them myself by getting both for The Elmwood Cemetery. I didn't have that option back when I wrote that question, but now I do.

:-)

~Christopher
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Initial post 26 OCT by thebig-bear
Lovely photo. May I ask, how do you find this tea to perform in your garden overall? I'm in the UK, and I'm always intrigued to find Teas that cope well outside in the garden in our climate. Yours looks to be doing pretty well!
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Reply #1 of 6 posted 26 OCT by Marlorena
Thank you, do give it a try... I planted it a few years ago in poor soil, dry and rubbly, I never water it, it thrives on neglect and tolerates full exposure [I'm in windy East Anglia]… can get hot and dry in summer.. it's one of my best roses, it grows wider than tall, about 4 x 6 foot this year..
..if I have to find fault, it's a bit narrow at the base, which means during full flush, if I get summer gales, I put a couple of stakes in, otherwise it gets top heavy...
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Reply #2 of 6 posted 26 OCT by thebig-bear
Thats great, thanks so much for answering so quickly.

I may well take the plunge and put one in somewhere and give it a go! I have a Lady Hillingdon that seems quite happy outside, and I'm trying an Archiduc Joseph this year, but my Safrano has never been the same since I evicted him from the comfort of the porch!

Thanks again.
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Reply #3 of 6 posted 26 OCT by Andrew from Dolton
Hi big-bear,

I just ordered 'Archduc Joseph' too, I've a position available in full sun against a corrugated iron shed that gets really hot. I'm evicting 'Duchess of Portland' who's a blackspot leper.
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Reply #4 of 6 posted 26 OCT by thebig-bear
Hi Andrew,

Oh its lovely, a really nice rose. If you like Teas you will love it!
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Reply #5 of 6 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
Well 'Archduc Joseph' arrived and is now planted. I have moved 'Duchess of Portland' to a position where it is unlikely to infect anything else. I also moved 'Tuscany' from the same location and planted it literally on top of 'Complicata', I think the colour combination of the two growing interlaced will be quite striking. This has freed up a space to squeeze in another rose into a hot sunny position, I know it is a gamble but I'm going to try Rosa hemisphaerica, my partner's buying it for an Xmas present. I'm on a role now pushing horticulture to tropical extremes!
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Reply #6 of 6 posted today by thebig-bear
Hi Andrew,

I admire your adventure in trying Hemisphaerica! Its not an easy rose from all I've heard and read, but it is a most beautiful and striking one when seen at it's best, I've often wondered about it. Good luck with it!
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Initial post 13 days ago by thebig-bear
Does anyone know if this rose was ever used as a rootstock in the UK? Are there any old gardens or collections known to have it?
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Reply #1 of 9 posted 13 days ago by Marlorena
I did have something on this rose written by Martyn Rix but lost on my computer for now... unable to trace on google either... I think it was written for the Historic Roses Group publication, from way back.... so sorry Steve I can't help... maybe Andrew can?..
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Reply #2 of 9 posted 13 days ago by Andrew from Dolton
Not sure if this is it but it's by Rix.

https://teddingtongardener.com/2014/04/06/bengal-beauty-a-first-class-rose-with-first-prize-for-the-first-flowers-of-the-year/
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Reply #3 of 9 posted 13 days ago by Marlorena
Thanks for checking Andrew but no, not that one, I've got that in my documents.. the one I'm thinking of was from 1999 or thereabouts, and I recall he specifically mentions R. indica Major... I made a point of keeping it and now I can't find it...
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Reply #4 of 9 posted 12 days ago by Patricia Routley
Martyn Rix wrote an article on China Roses in the R.N.R.S. Historic Roses Group Spring 1999 journal (No. 17), on page 8, but on a quick look through, I cannot see anything on R. indica major.
There are a few early English references in the HelpMeFind file.
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Reply #5 of 9 posted 12 days ago by Marlorena
Patricia, thanks for checking on this, and obviously I appear to have mixed something up.. I was 99 percent certain it was in that article which seems to be the one I was referring to... and it's also the one Andrew linked to above as well, - the 1999 article on China Roses written by Rix....I thought it was a different one but that can't be the case now... I feel sure it's a rose he would have talked about, and it's stuck in my memory somewhere...

thanks again...

I should add, it's a very beautiful rose looking at the photos... if that's rootstock I'd want it to sucker...
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Reply #6 of 9 posted 12 days ago by thebig-bear
Hi Marlorena,

I hope you do find the reference, it will be very interesting to read.

I really hope R. Indica Major is available somewhere in some form in this country, as it is such a beautiful looking rose - it reminds me so much of some of Redoute's best paintings. And I had never heard of it until a couple of days ago!

Thanks everyone for their thoughts on this, please keep em coming.....
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Reply #7 of 9 posted yesterday by Marlorena
I've found the links I was referring to above Steve, [if you're still checking in here], but I can't post links for some reason, it disappears off my screen when I try to post...

It wasn't by Rix after all... I found it rummaging around on my computer... it refers to a London publication from 1874 which in turn quotes a French journal detailing how the rose was used as understock, mainly in the south of France though... I'll try to post links another time... there are 3 altogether..
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Reply #8 of 9 posted yesterday by Marlorena
Well I've tried 4 times to post links but no good... sorry... let's see if this one works.. I've removed the https// bit..

babel.hathitrust.org/cgi/pt?id=hvd.32044103104576;view=1up;seq=109


bulbnrose.x10.mx/Roses/Picture_view/rosefram.htm

bulbnrose.x10.mx/Roses/Picture_view/rosefram.htm
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Reply #9 of 9 posted today by thebig-bear
Hi Marlorena,

I am indeed still checking here! Great links! - thank you for sticking with it and finding them, they are very interesting.
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Initial post 19 NOV 14 by Salix
The pigments were found very similar to R. foetida.

http://bulbnrose.x10.mx/Roses/breeding/EugsterCarotene1991/EugsterCarotene1991.html, table 4, note [i].
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Reply #1 of 3 posted 9 days ago by CybeRose
How clever of you to catch that. :-)

However, they actually wrote: "R. foetida persiana and R. ecae show practically identical results."

This may be hair-splitting, but I have been told that 'Persian Yellow' is a triploid, unlike R. foetida.
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Reply #2 of 3 posted today by Nastarana
In the description is:

Botanists have since determined that the two species are either distinct species or different varieties of a single species.

Could someone please explain. What does that mean?
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Reply #3 of 3 posted today by jedmar
This is indeed a bit confusing. Rosa xanthina Hook.f. is not the Rose we generally know as Rosa xanthina Lindl. In Curtis's Botanical Magazine of July 1, 1899 there was a description of a "Rosa xanthina" which was pictured and named as the latter with the statement:
"The specific name Ecae is derived from the initials of Mrs. Aitchison's name, given before the plant was identified with Lindley's Rosa xanthina. The specimen figured is from a plant raised at the Royal Gardens from seed sent by Dr. Aitchison in 1880."

However, it was later apparently concluded that this description was not of R. xanthina Lindl. as claimed, but a different species. In that case, the name Rosa ecae Aitch. which had already been published 1880 had again priority and was valid. I have modified the note to "distinct species" only.
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