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H. Kemp (1913)  Page(s) 11.  
 
St. Helena HT.  Cream with a pink blush in centre, yellow at the base of petals and in some instances coming yellow well up the centre of the bloom;  large full flowers, perfectly formed with long shell-shaped petals; a magnificent flower, carried perfectly erect.  Gold medal N.R.S. 

Les roses (1910)  
 
'Baron Ernest Leroy', qui lui valut une médaille du département [de Seine-Inférieure], en 1866, une fois cédé, fut mis au commerce sous le nom de 'Colonel de Sansal' ; la 'Rose Impératrice' devint 'Madame H. Jamain' ; la superbe Rose Ile-Bourbon, 'Le Bienheureux de La Salle' fut lancée dans le commerce sous le nom de 'Madame Isaac Pereire' ; enfin fâcheusement, d'autres variétés de Garçon figurent dans les catalogues avec un autre nom que le sien comme obtenteur. 

Les roses (1910)  
 
'Baron Ernest Leroy', qui lui valut une médaille du département [de Seine-Inférieure], en 1866, une fois cédé, fut mis au commerce sous le nom de 'Colonel de Sansal' ; la 'Rose Impératrice' devint 'Madame H. Jamain' ; la superbe Rose Ile-Bourbon, 'Le Bienheureux de La Salle' fut lancée dans le commerce sous le nom de 'Madame Isaac Pereire' ; enfin fâcheusement, d'autres variétés de Garçon figurent dans les catalogues avec un autre nom que le sien comme obtenteur. 

Les roses (1910)  
 
'Baron Ernest Leroy', qui lui valut une médaille du département [de Seine-Inférieure], en 1866, une fois cédé, fut mis au commerce sous le nom de 'Colonel de Sansal' ; la 'Rose Impératrice' devint 'Madame H. Jamain' ; la superbe Rose Ile-Bourbon, 'Le Bienheureux de La Salle' fut lancée dans le commerce sous le nom de 'Madame Isaac Pereire' ; enfin fâcheusement, d'autres variétés de Garçon figurent dans les catalogues avec un autre nom que le sien comme obtenteur. 

The Floral Magazine (1861)  Page(s) Pl. 64.  Includes photo(s).
 
Plate 64 CELINE FORESTIER ROSE. Rosa (hybrida).
Though not comparable in its individual blossoms with some of the splendid Tea-scented or other fine varieties of the Rose now met with in gardens, yet on the ground of its decorative capabilities, and consequently its real usefulness, a first-rank position may be claimed for the variety, of which the accompanying figure is a portrait. We are indebted to Mr.S tandish, of Bagshot, for the specimens here figured, and for most of the following information respecting the variety.
Celine Forestier is a Noisette Rose, raised many years ago, it appears, at Angers in France, but only quite recently introduced to general cultivation. In its general appearance it much resembles an old variety named Triomphe de Rennes, which has been described as one of the best of the yellow Roses; but the present produces much better foliage, and is altogether a freer and more healthy-growing variety. The plant is of vigorous habit, and a rapid grower, making shoots of three feet and upwards in length, these strong shoots being, as in all the Noisette Roses, terminated by a cluster of flowers, which in this case are finely double, cupped, and of a bright yellow.The plants being also clothed with ample and beautiful foliage, have a very showy and ornamental character. The terminal clusters of blossoms, too, after having spent their beauties and their sweets, are succeeded by other flowers from the axils of the leaves below, one, two, or three blossoms being produced from each axil, so that the branches become converted into complete wreaths of Roses. In this way flowers are produced continuously through the season, till they are stayed by frost. 
This will be found to be decidedly the most useful of all the yellow Roses; indeed, for training against a wall, or over trellis-work, or around a pole or pillar, it is unsurpassed. It is moreover the hardiest of all the yellow Roses, which alone is no small recommendation.
The variety, we learn, strikes freely from cuttings; and,like free-growing Roses generally, will grow well in almost  any kind of rich soil,provided it is well drained. One of the finest situations that could be selected for its growth, would be a bank backed by sheltering shrubs, which would also serve as a relief to its flowers. Here, associated with some of the free-growing varieties with rich dark-coloured flowers, and all allowed to grow wild with their branches intertwined, the subject of our present illustration would form a brilliant figure in a picture of surpassing beauty.
Plate 64.—Rosa (hybrida) Celine Forestier: flowers cupped, in large terminal clusters, pale bright-yellow;h abit vigorous.

The Floral Magazine (1861)  Page(s) Pl. 44.  Includes photo(s).
 
Plate 44. COMTE DE FALLOUX ROSE.Rosa(hybrida).
Mr.Fitch’s admirable portrait will be a sufficient encomium on this beautiful Rose, which was raised by M. Trouillard, of Angers, a gentleman who has been singularly fortunate in originating some of the very finest seedling Roses known, at present, in cultivation.
The Comte de Falloux Rose is a seedling obtained from the well-known and universally admired Hybrid Perpetual called Geant des Batailles, which it very much resembles in shape. It has even still more brilliant flowers, and is in reality a very fine cupped variety, of a bright scarlet-crimson colour. The entire stock is now in the possession of Mr. Standish, of the Royal Nursery, Bagshot, who has, we are informed, purchased it, along with several other fine varieties, of M. Trouillard; and we are indebted to this gentleman for the specimens from which our drawing has been made.
One of the most desirable qualities attributed to this new Rose is its remarkable floriferous habit. On two or three occasions small worked plants have been exhibited, bearing what under the circumstances were very fine flowers; and Mr. Standish describes the constant habit of the variety as being the most floriferous of any he has seen. “No matter,” he observes, “whether summer or winter, it never makes a shoot but there is sure to be a flower on the top of it. It could be made to bloom throughout the winter, and consequently will be the best of all pot Roses for forcing. ”This quite agrees with all we have seen of it.
Though generally classed with the Hybrid Perpetual group, Mr. W. Paul places the parent of the present variety in a group which he names after the Rose called Gloire de Rosomene, and traces back to Rosa indica. The Hybrid Perpetuals themselves seem to have arisen from the blending in a very gradual way, and through a long course of generations, of the Chinese or Indian with the Damask Roses, all trace of the originals being nearly or quite obliterated by the completeness of the fusion which has taken place. In whatever way originated, they form a most valuable section of the family for garden purposes. We learn that the Comte de Falloux is a tractable variety under cultivation. It grows well, we are told, grafted on the Manetti stock, or when struck from cuttings; but as far as his experience has yetg one, Mr. Standish thinks it will be best where worked on the Manetti. Like all Roses,it will amply repay liberal treatment.

Plate 44.—Rosa (hybrida) Comte de Falloux: flowers cupped, bright scarlet-crimson, resembling those of Geant des Batailles, but finer.

The Floral Magazine (1861)  Page(s) Pl. 29.  Includes photo(s).
 
Plate 29. PRESIDENT ROSE. Rosa indica, var.
This beautiful Rose is of American origin, and was introduced to the public last year through Mr. William Paul, of the Cheshunt Nurseries, Waltham Cross, by whom some magnificent specimens were furnished for our drawing in the course of the past summer. We can only regret that our limited page by no means does justice to the admirably cultivated examples furnished by our friend.
The President Rose has been exhibited before the chief metropolitan authorities, and has borne away the honours of a first-class certificate from the Royal Botanic Society, and from the Floral Committee of the Horticultural Society. The beautiful blossoms produced by the plants exhibited on the occasions referred to, well entitled it to such distinction.
We learn from Mr. Paul that the plant is of free growth and of a hardy character, being, in regard to habit and constitution, very similar to the variety called Caroline, which was one of its parents. Its wood is of a firm and rather wiry character, and its foliage bold and healthy-looking, while the flowers, which are globular in form, are large, full of firm smooth petals, and verys weet. The colour is blush, tinged in the younger stages withs almony-buff, as shown in our figure, but in the older stages the latter tint more or less passes away. Mr. Paul describes the colours as fawn and salmon, varying somewhat according to the season at which it blooms. The plants bloom freely and force well. The variety is no doubt a decided acquisition to the group to which it belongs, and will take rank
Plate29. — Rosa indica, var. President: flowers large, full, globular,with firm well-cupped petals, blush tinged with salmony-buff, very fragrant.

Australian Rose Annual (1930)  Page(s) 65.  
 
Some kinds are quite unsuited for cutting, almost immediately losing their beauty when taken from the plant. Amongst these may be mentioned ‘Beatrice’, ‘Mme. Caroline Testout’…..Souv. de Maria de Zayas . ‘W. R. Smith’ and ‘Mme. Jules Gravereaux’.

Australian Rose Annual (1962)  Page(s) 94.  
 
Dr. A. S. Thomas. Then and Now. ….in 1926 I built a home in Bentleigh, a southern suburb of Melbourne. I planted the varieties that had done well in my time in Mudgee and I added a few that were reputed to have done well since I left there. These included…. and Souv. de Maria de Zayas

C. Langbecker & Sons (1946)  Page(s) 7.  
 
Souv. de Maria de Zayas HT. Deep carmine; double. 1111
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