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Jay-Jay
most recent 2 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 4 SEP 13 by jim1961
Hi all,

I really liked Livin Easy BUT had to shovel prune because of bad blackspot in our no
spray garden!
LE got through our winters fine, grew fast, and LE bloomed well with 3+" bloom size...

LOCATION: CENTRAL PA....
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Reply #1 of 11 posted 5 SEP 13 by Jay-Jay
The same over here and it got weaker every year and died.
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Reply #2 of 11 posted 9 MAY 15 by Shredder
It had blackspot in my garden as well. It died last year after a very, very cold winter in zone 6/5.
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Reply #3 of 11 posted 9 MAY 15 by Jay-Jay
The final blow indeed came from a very cold winter too over here.
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Reply #4 of 11 posted 2 JUN 15 by sutekesh
This is the third season in my garden, Zone 6b Switzerland and already showing signs of black spot - again!! I am going to make a habit of reading the member comments and not just the main page in future.
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Reply #5 of 11 posted 2 JUN 15 by Jay-Jay
A very good intention! Sometimes ratings are a hint too.
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Reply #6 of 11 posted 2 JUN 15 by Jay-Jay
So the statement in the description, that this rose is "very blackspot-resistent", can be referred to the garbage bin... or to the land of the fairy-tales.
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Reply #7 of 11 posted 2 JUN 15 by Patricia Routley
Binned. Thanks Jay-Jay
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Reply #8 of 11 posted 18 NOV by HappyRose
Did great first year, beautiful abundant roses and second year nothing.
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Reply #9 of 11 posted 2 days ago by Matt's Northwest Florida Garden
I have to spray fungicide on all of my Hybrid Teas and Floribunda's here in hot humid florida. I can grow old Teas, Noisettes and some shrubs here without spraying, but I will continue to spray my HT's and FL's twice a month for unique and beautiful flowers .
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Reply #10 of 11 posted 2 days ago by HappyRose
What brand do u use of fungicide
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Reply #11 of 11 posted 2 days ago by Matt's Northwest Florida Garden
It depends, In the cooler months I mix Daconil and Propaconizole together in one spray tank and apply it twice a month. In warmer weather I rotate with either Immunox or Theophanate Methyl, or Propaconizole mixed with Dithane. Rotation is key so blackspot doesn't develop resistance. My spray period is March through October. If we go through a hot and dry period, I usually quit spraying for that time since the warm and dry weather naturally reduces disease. I don't spray my OGRs or Shrub roses and they do fine. This program is for picky hybrid teas, like Peace, Brandy, Papa Meilland. I can grow Mr. Lincoln or floribundas like Valentine without spraying but I love yellos and orange long stemmed HTs as well
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most recent 3 days ago SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 6 days ago by CybeRose
Medecyn-boec (1582)
Dr. Christoph Wirsung (Wirtsung in the book)

Rosa autumnalis — winter roose

Dodoens (1578) identified Rosa autumnalis as the Musk rose.

Wirtsung, however, gave a handful of Musk rose synonyms (Alexandrina, Caroneola [sic], Damascena, Muscata/Moscata, and Syriaca) but distinguished R. autumnalis as the "winter roose".

Ein neuwes Artzney Buch (1577)
Dr. Christoph Wirsung

Rosa autumnalis — haberrose
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Reply #1 of 8 posted 6 days ago by jedmar
There is some confusion about these early German names. "Haberrose" means "Oats Rose" and was apparently a name given to a wils rose which was often found on oats fields. I have seen it identified as Rosa arvensis, Rosa canina or Ros rubiginosa, with white or red blooms.
Wirsung in his "Ein new Artzney Buch" in the register for
Rosa autumnalis. HerbstRose. Such Pappelen. (see Poplars).
Under Pappeln, we find: "Das vierdte Geschlecht der Pappeln/ ist das schöne Gewechs/ dass wir Ehrenrosen/Herbstrosen/Halssrosen/Breunrosen/ unnnd Winterrosen nennen/ heisst Griechisch Molóche, Lateinisch bey dem Apuleio Hastula regia, Bey den Bräutlern Malua transmarina, Rosa transmarina, Rosa hyemalis, unnd Rosa autumnalis. Die Apotecker nennen es Maluam arboram."
[The fourth species of poplars id the beautiful plant which we call Honour roses/Autumn roses/Neck roses/Brown roses/called Moloché in Greek/ in Latin by Apuleius Hastula regia, with brides Malua transmarina, Rosa transmarina, Rosa hyemalis, and Rosa autumnalis. The apothecaries call it Maluam arboram.]
Moloché is Malva, i.e. mallow. For Hastula regia I find White asphodel or Pseudoasphodelus alpinum = Anthericum ramosum. Rosa hyemalis means Winter rose. For Rosa transmarina = Mauve de Jardin, Malva romana, Pappel-Rosen, Rosen-Pappel, Herbst-Rosen (Rosa autumnalis, as it apperas only in autumn), Winter-Rosen (Rosa hyemalis, as they bloom at the harvest until into winter).
Clearly Rosa autumnalis and Rosa hyemalis in this context is the Mallow.
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Reply #2 of 8 posted 6 days ago by CybeRose
Thanks, Jedmar. I was google-translating, and getting Pappelen = Apples (Dutch).

I assume that Rosa Punicea was another name for the dark red rose, rather than R. foetida bicolor. The same name was sometimes later used for the Crimson China.

It is strange to see Rosa palustris and R. arvensis as names for non-roses.

What is "Bisem Rose"?

Karl
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Reply #3 of 8 posted 6 days ago by Jay-Jay
Apples = Appels in Dutch.
Pappel is German for Poplar
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Reply #4 of 8 posted 5 days ago by jedmar
Bisam-Rose (Bisem is an old spelling) is Rosa moschata. Bisam is the Musk rat Ondathra zibethicus.
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Reply #5 of 8 posted 5 days ago by CybeRose
Thank you, Jedmar. You are a great help as always.

And how peculiar. Reading Wirsung's lists, it is no surprise to see a Hondroose (Dog Rose). Then I learned that the yellow rose (gele, geel, gheele) was also called Rosa vulpina, Fox Rose. And now you tell me about the Musk Rat Rose.

I'm still puzzling over: soeckt Roose, Rosa punicea.
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Reply #6 of 8 posted 5 days ago by jedmar
Yes Fuchs-Rose (fox rose) is Rosa foetida. Punicea comes from Latin puniceus (purplish red) and was used for Austrian Copper; but often also in the form phoeniceo/phoenicea when a purple colouring was meant. I think you have "soeckt Roose, Rosa punicea" from a index in Dutch, where "soeckt" is an old form for see/seek.
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Reply #7 of 8 posted 4 days ago by CybeRose
So, I was trying to reconcile two lists, one German and one Dutch. No wonder I was getting confused.
Thanks again for your valuable help.
Karl
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Reply #8 of 8 posted 3 days ago by CybeRose
And ultimately from the Greek Phoiníkē (purple people).

However, I have a sense that some later writers may have been referring to pomegranate flowers (Mala punica / Punica granatum).

Ferrari (1633) described a Hippeastrum (possibly H. puniceum). The flowers were "purpura in crocum languente coloratos". This reads like a recipe: purpura (from the Murex mollusk) mixed with a little saffron. In the Italian translation of 1638 the color was simply "rancio" (orange).
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most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 5 days ago by raingreen
The flower looks like something out of a fairytale Jay Jay!!! Nate
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Reply #1 of 4 posted 5 days ago by Jay-Jay
Thank You Nate. It is a really early bloomer but has an appearance with stakes and normally with light-green foliage. Repeats well.
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Reply #2 of 4 posted 4 days ago by raingreen
You mean you have to stake the plant??
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Reply #3 of 4 posted 4 days ago by Jay-Jay
No, the branches are like stakes. Upright and not very attractive. Pale green too.
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Reply #4 of 4 posted 4 days ago by raingreen
Oh, understood. N
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most recent 4 days ago HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post 4 days ago by Jay-Jay
Wonderful rose and wonderful shot!
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