HelpMeFind Roses, Clematis and Peonies
Roses, Clematis and Peonies
and everything gardening related.
Site ChangesPhotosPlant IntroductionsReviews & CommentsMember JournalsPlantsPlant References 
Recent Member Comments, Questions and Answers
most recent today SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 30 NOV 16 by steve fritz
Seedlings of Silver Jubilee tend to be dense and bushy. But not particularly disease resistant.
REPLY
Reply #1 of 3 posted today by jmile
Silver Jubilee does well here in zone 9B in a no spray garden. It shows no tendency toward disease.
REPLY
Reply #2 of 3 posted today by steve fritz
Which varieties of roses do you grow there that appear free of disease? And how long have they been in place?
Roses often do not show diseases until they have been in the same spot in the garden for 2 or 3 years. I think the pathogens need to get established in the soil around them.
REPLY
Reply #3 of 3 posted today by jmile
I have over 3000 rose plants of all kinds. Most of the roses are HT (many of which are Florist Roses) and FL. The weather here is 90 to over 100 degrees for most of the summer. The only time I have any sign of fungus in my garden is in the spring. When it gets hot, the leaves affected fall off and new growth appears fungus free. All of the roses in the main garden have been there more than 10 year. When I first planted my garden, I used fungicides. Then one year I didn't spray and the roses did better than ever. I now have a spray free garden except for the Fusilade II that I spray to prevent grasses and a pre-emergent that we spray once in the winter.
REPLY
most recent today HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post today by papowell
This is interesting... after I sent you email about the premium account, the page refresh for My HMF Account now shows 'Premium Member'. So the upgrade is now shown.
REPLY
most recent today HIDE POSTS
 
Initial post today by papowell
Upgraded membership. On the 'My Account' page there does not seem to be a 'membership level' indication.

When I tried to send some private messages I ran into the '2 message per day' limit even though I have a premium account.
REPLY
most recent today SHOW ALL
 
Initial post 6 days ago by jedmar
If you check the photos of hips of Rosa virginiana on this page, you will see that some of the pictures show smooth hips, while others prickly hips. In Roessig's 1801 drawing, he differentiates between Rosa lucida (prickly hips) and Rosa virginiana (smooth hips). So, is the synonym incorrect?
REPLY
Reply #1 of 8 posted 5 days ago by Patricia Routley
Jedmar, I have no time right now to do more than say, I found your question so interesting. We have some rain coming up in the next day or so and I really look forward to hunkering down then to look closer at the references and comments. (I only wish I could read those French references).
REPLY
Reply #2 of 8 posted 3 days ago by jedmar
Patricia, I have added the translations from French, but mind that I am no botanist!
REPLY
Reply #3 of 8 posted 2 days ago by Patricia Routley
You are very kind. Thank you for doing that Jedmar.
The complexity of the various references brings home to me that none of us are botanists. Me especially - I am just an old lady gardener.

I recall once, was it Karl? who said that a bush can produce prickles at will, and I have certainly seen this type of behaviour on the odd rose or two in my own garden. Simplifying the names here, I am wondering if R. virginiana / R. lucida also does this from time to time. I didn’t note the hip prickles on my bush for many years until I photographed it, but perhaps I didn’t look closely enough in the early years.

I note that Rossig’s 1801 illustrations show
R. virginiana: a smooth (a little pointed towards the base) hip
R. lucida: a prickly (globular) hip.
Yet in his text he writes of
R. virginiana: “Ovary almost globular, slightly bristly”.
R. lucida: “a Globular, flattened ovary”. (No mention of bristles)

The 1817 reference is a little confusing to me as Thory has written of R. lucida having “Receptacles and pedicels armed with reddish glandular hairs” and “heps depressed globose red”. I can discern the hairs on the top bud in the illustration, but only with a magnifying glass. Knowing that the receptacle is the early stage, from which the hip is formed much later, I can only note that Redoute has drawn a very smooth hip.

In the 1817 reference Thory mentions that the R. lucida blooms do not last for more than several hours. In my 2013 reference I had noted “They seem to have come and gone before I can get the camera out.” I am going to add to my own records the possibility that my rose may be R. Lucida. But I really do not have the knowledge to do more than that. I do notice you pouring in the early references for this rose, and I thank you for your dedication and sharing.
REPLY
Reply #4 of 8 posted 2 days ago by jedmar
I have added Rössig's 1799 descriptions in German. Translations will follow. An important difference seems to me that R. virginiana is stated to have matte foliage, while R. lucida has glossy ones.
REPLY
Reply #5 of 8 posted yesterday by Andrew from Dolton
The rose I bought five years ago from David Austin has smooth hips and shiny leaves. The flowers in the picture are lighter pink in reality.

https://www.davidaustinroses.co.uk/r-virginiana
REPLY
Reply #6 of 8 posted yesterday by Patricia Routley
It would be good to have a close-up photo of the mid-term and ripe hips.
REPLY
Reply #7 of 8 posted today by jedmar
I think one of the issues is that different botanists named distinct roses R. virginiana. The references are not consistent in their synonms. Furthermore, there is some mix-up of R. carolina and R. palustris, too. You can see totally different hip forms in the photos of R. palustris, for example.
REPLY
Reply #8 of 8 posted today by Andrew from Dolton
Is it possible that lucida could be a subspecies of Rosa carolina?
REPLY
© 2018 HelpMeFind.com